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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the market for an IS300, and I am wondering if a Supra ECU would work for a 2jz-GE for IS300, such as one from Enjuku

Other questions:
Would a cd009 swap for 500ish hp be better than a r154 or w58?

What are some good sites for 2jz building?

Would it be more viable to get a Non-VVTi GTE head or go for a performance aftermarket head?

Would a precision turbo be the best option for a turbo, or are there better ones? Preferably 56-70mm turbine

Buying question: I live in the Seattle area and we get lots of rain here. Where are the key spots to check for rust?

Thanks for considering my questions!
 

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The IS300 relies on the ecu to run the engine, the radiator fans, the climate control system, cruise control, the instrument cluster and the automatic transmission if equipped. While the Supra ecu could be made to run the engine, you'll lose all the other functionality mentioned.

Plenty of reading to do around here (and other places) about CD009 vs R154 vs V160 vs. T56 vs. etc... But bottom line is both CD and R154 can handle the job. Advantage of the R154 is it's a straight-forward swap and it's gearing is well suited for the IS300 rear gears. Advantage of the CD009 is more modern design, quieter, smoother.

Regarding VVTi vs non VVTi - the most common route for performance builds is non-VVTi, but I'm not really sure why. My understanding is the airflow of the VVTi head is a bit better. They're way less expensive, plus VVTi is a low rpm torque advantage. The disadvantage of the VVTi head is fewer manifold choices. Regardless, 500hp is not a problem either way you go.

There are lots of excellent turbos on the market these days. Precision certainly has great choices, but I wouldn't call them "best option". If you want to spend money on a premium turbo, also look at the Garrrett G-series and the Brog Warner EFR.

Look for rust in all the normal spots - rocker panels, wheel wells, undercarriage in general.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The IS300 relies on the ecu to run the engine, the radiator fans, the climate control system, cruise control, the instrument cluster and the automatic transmission if equipped. While the Supra ecu could be made to run the engine, you'll lose all the other functionality mentioned.

Plenty of reading to do around here (and other places) about CD009 vs R154 vs V160 vs. T56 vs. etc... But bottom line is both CD and R154 can handle the job. Advantage of the R154 is it's a straight-forward swap and it's gearing is well suited for the IS300 rear gears. Advantage of the CD009 is more modern design, quieter, smoother.

Regarding VVTi vs non VVTi - the most common route for performance builds is non-VVTi, but I'm not really sure why. My understanding is the airflow of the VVTi head is a bit better. They're way less expensive, plus VVTi is a low rpm torque advantage. The disadvantage of the VVTi head is fewer manifold choices. Regardless, 500hp is not a problem either way you go.

There are lots of excellent turbos on the market these days. Precision certainly has great choices, but I wouldn't call them "best option". If you want to spend money on a premium turbo, also look at the Garrrett G-series and the Brog Warner EFR.

Look for rust in all the normal spots - rocker panels, wheel wells, undercarriage in general.
Alright that is really helpful! You mentioned that a supra ecu would not run is300 accessories, but I can obviously wire it in with a supra harness?
 

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Not sure what you're asking, but perhaps this will be helpful:

All of the peripherals I mentioned are run via the Toyota ''BEAN'' multiplex (MPX) system. This was Toyotas late 1990s thru mid 2000s CANbus system. CAN is Controller Area Network. A CANbus allows various digital microcontrollers tio be daisy-chained together, and perform two way communication with one another.

The Supra ecu won't work on the IS300 CANbus.

Perhaps if you explained what you're trying to achieve, we can be more helpful; it's not that hard to achieve a 450-500whp 2J in an IS300.
 

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Not sure if this is what you are meaning, but some turbo setups run a dual ECU setup with IS ECU running the regular stuff and the Aristo or other ECU running the engine management side. Obviously there is a bit of faffing around and some signal sharing to sort out but it can be done. I would imagine a "Supra" ecu will be hard to find, especially a turbo tuned one. The disadvantage with the Aristo and Supra setup will be they arent really tunable so you are stuck with a low boost/fuel/power setup. But then the bottom end needs to be built up first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not sure what you're asking, but perhaps this will be helpful:

All of the peripherals I mentioned are run via the Toyota ''BEAN'' multiplex (MPX) system. This was Toyotas late 1990s thru mid 2000s CANbus system. CAN is Controller Area Network. A CANbus allows various digital microcontrollers tio be daisy-chained together, and perform two way communication with one another.

The Supra ecu won't work on the IS300 CANbus.

Perhaps if you explained what you're trying to achieve, we can be more helpful; it's not that hard to achieve a 450-500whp 2J in an IS300.
What I am looking to do is get a reliable, but rather cheap 500-600hp out of the 2jz. I am not looking to make it to a sbox, but I was wondering if anything buttoned up from a Supra ECU such as one from a ECU company. According to you, I would need a Supra CANbus, or get a more rare ECU for altezzas. Do I even need a aftermarket ECU to turbo a N/A is300? If so, my question is now irrelevant.
 

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There are a few low boost setups running nothing more than an FMU for fuel control, but 500-600hp is going to require full fuel and spark control.

You can achieve this a number of ways. There are some inexpensive units on the market that basically intercept the fuel and spark signals from the Toyota ecu, allowing you to recalibrate as you see fit. One of them is the MAPecu. I've not used it, but I've read about it and it's supposed to be pretty good.

Another concept is how my car is currently configured: The Toyota ecu is in place and hooked up, but basically its ignition and injector wires have been clipped. It is responsible for all its original functionality except fuel/spark. A second, programmable ecu is installed and taps into the cam/crank signals (which also go to the toyota ecu). It handles fuel/spark control. My car has been configured this way for 15 years, and it works just fine. However, it's a rather ancient ecu with limited functionality.

A more expensive but certainly more integrated and cleaner implementation is a stand-alone ecu that is capable of running the Toyota CANbus. The Link G4x can definitely do it, but I believe one of the Haltech Elites can, too. Most standalones these days will do CAN - the trick is understanding the CAN message protocol, and programming the ecu to format the messages correctly. While this approach is a bit more expensive and involved - you can achieve a much cleaner install with lots more functionality. I'm working on an upfit to one of these, currently.

Really looking forward to traction control, boost-by gear, closed loop boost control, blip-on-downshift, antilag, launch control, as well as a bunch of other features.

Please note the Toyota automatic trans can only be controlled via the Toyota ecu... Although there's a guy on one of the forums that claims to have reverse engineered the transmission control and built his own "standalone" transmission controller. He does not share details on how he did this, nor does he offer it for sale. So you're on your own for all required engineering to control an automatic trans without the Toyota ecu.
 

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Also:

Regarding the hard parts you'll need for 500hp... You don't need anything special. To give you an idea, my car is what they call an NA-T, which means it's the original 2JZ-GE VVTi that's been turboed. It has the GTE rods and pistons installed, but otherwise the longblock is stock. It makes 470whp and does this with an ancient MP70 turbo @ 17psi, 3" downpipe/exhaust, a cast log exhaust manifold and a decent intercooler.

I believe there is quite a bit more on the table, but my injectors were at 95% duty cycle (which is really too high) so I wasn't able to dial in more boost. With larger injectors, I speculate I probably could have continued making power up to maybe 25psi, which would likely be 550whp or so. But, it's hard to guess when a turbine housing is going to begin restricting you without measuring exhaust back pressure (which I wasn't).

Final thought: Don't underestimate how potent 450whp is in a ~3100lb car. Coyote Mustangs, LS3/LT1 Camaros and Apache Challengers are all strong, but they are also nearly 1000lb heavier... I've had little trouble outrunning any of these.
 

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Chat with Induction performance/check out their site for different engine build packages.

Back in the day, I think there was some misconception on the VVTi engines couldn't make power. Likely brought on by some guy who didn't know how to tune or work with the VVTi, cam profiles available at the time, etc.. In general, understanding is light years ahead now and I would for sure go with either GE or GTE VVTi for the torque and turbo spool advantages.

The GE VVTi head will be much more readily available as Aristo GTE motors are big money nowadays (people realize their potential and stock in the yards getting low).

My opinion is that the PTE is a solid turbo choice but overly hyped with extremely shady dyno representation by some in the Supra crowd at times. Non biased third party dynos never really look as optimistic as original vendors that pimped them anyway. They did well to put together and market their own hybrid turbo option, however it is getting old. The new Garrett G series were updated in past couple of years and are supposed to flow 30% more with same wheels.. which means less inertia, better efficiency everywhere on the compressor map, etc. than whatever hybrids guys made out of older stuff.

As others have mentioned consider Aristo GTE ECU if you want stock ECU instead of the Supra ECU... there are some giant threads on here about guys who've tried the Aristo conversion...

I prefer the aftermarket ECU functionality for several reasons that Hogdon mentioned...

Keep in mind that the Toyota/2J has become progressively harder of a platform to do 'cheap'
 
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