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Übercargeek
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Discussion Starter #1
From WardsAuto.com:

New Technology Allows Vehicles to Talk It Up
By Barbara McClellan

There’s lots of frenzied media speculation these days about potential automotive tie-ups, sparked by a possible Renault-Nissan-General Motors alliance.

Yet, major auto makers already share a host of partnerships without making full-blown commitments. Many of these have to do with hydrogen fuel cells and other advanced powertrains, but there also are a number of safety-technology collaborations, as well.

One noteworthy endeavor is an effort to develop common vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications systems that promise to limit blind-spot collisions and maintain safe distances from vehicles ahead and behind using new sensing technology.

The Federal Communications Commission is so impressed with the possibility it recently dedicated a 5.9 gigahertz frequency for vehicle systems to broadcast their location to one another.
But automotive engineers say in order for cars and trucks to communicate, they first have to speak the same language.

That’s where the Crash Avoidance Metric Partners (CAMP) group comes in. The consortium, established by GM and Ford and including DaimlerChrysler, Toyota and Hyundai, is seeking to establish such standardization.

That’s because although V2V hardware takes a low-key approach to the vehicle’s appearance, the science is worthy of Star Wars.
GM’s in-house system, which is leading the way, basically consists of a roof-mounted transponder, antenna and communications chips.

Together, they enable a vehicle to broadcast its location and monitor the position of hundreds of other cars with the same capability 10 times every minute. The broadcast range is about 984 ft. (300 m) – roughly three times that of traditional radar.

What does this mean for a driver? A vehicle traveling at 35 mph (56 km/h) headed straight for a stalled car, for example, would see a green vehicle icon on the dash-mounted monitor, used to indicate speed and the distance between vehicles, turn to yellow.

About 30 yards (27 m) out, the icon would turn red. At the same time, the stalled vehicle’s turn signals and brake lights would flash in a rapid warning sequence. A second later, the brakes would seize control of the moving car, pulling it to a sudden stop some 15 ft. (4.6 m) short of the stationary vehicle.

The system also alerts the driver when a passing vehicle is approaching, flashing an amber caution light in the side mirror. If the driver engages the turn signal and another vehicle is in the blind spot, the system sends a vibration through the driver’s seat.

The V2V technology also can trigger a vehicle’s taillights to flash, cautioning an approaching driver against tailgating, potentially preventing chain-reaction collisions on congested roads during rush hour.

Such advanced collision-avoidance measures generally start out costing top dollar and show up in expensive luxury cars well before they filter down to the masses.

But GM claims it can provide V2V capability with a single, low-priced sensor. Although it may take five to 10 years before the technology can be deployed widely, the auto maker says it may look into selling its system as an aftermarket device for $200 or less.

That’s a concept everyone can live with.

http://wardsauto.com/commentary/technology_vehicles_talk/
 

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Garage Pit Crew Chief
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As part of my Master's research work, I worked in a wireless computing lab, where one of the PhD students was working on car - to - car communication using bluetooth. This was 5 years ago, based on a technology that was still new back then, and it was promising.

I wonder if this frequency will be used for just "presence communication", or can be extended for other information exchange, such as music off the built-in HDD in the car, phone numbers stored in the car's on-board computer, or other, similar things ?

The one extended use that the PhD student was working on was sharing of traffic info accumulated from other cars, to help the next driver avoid traffic ahead. Wonder if this thing can be combined with the XM realtime traffic thing so cars can "help" other cars not equipped with XM...?????

Just some random thoughts :)
 

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Übercargeek
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Discussion Starter #5
An article from Automotive News

An article from Automotive News via Autoweek adds some information:

Crash Control
Cadillacs' electronic chat deters collision
By TIM MORAN

DETROIT -- Every driving instructor reminds students to "watch out for the other guy" to prevent accidents.

Now General Motors has equipped a few Cadillacs with a prototype system that watches out for the other guy's car and can slam on the brakes to prevent a rear-end collision.

The CTS and STS vehicles demonstrated the future of vehicle-to-vehicle electronic technology during the Convergence conference in Detroit in mid-October. The technology is still too new for cost estimates. But it combines many existing systems in vehicles to achieve its aims. GM says it developed the technology.

GM's demonstration underscores the rapid movement toward wireless safety technology, which is also being developed aggressively by other automakers and Tier 1 suppliers. The concept has been around for at least a decade. But the increasing fusion of in-car electronics such as braking, stability control and advanced navigation devices is now allowing practical application of such systems.

Cars talk to cars

Using a combination of global positioning navigation devices, short-distance radio communication and input from existing in-vehicle sensors, the vehicle-to-vehicle -- or V2V -- cars can tell each other where they are and calculate whether danger threatens.

GM drivers demonstrated by positioning a Cadillac at the end of a long straightaway set up in a parking lot. Another car then accelerated toward the rear of the stopped one.

Passengers in the approaching car saw an instrument panel warning appear as the distance to the stopped car shortened. First a green car-shaped emblem was displayed on the in-car screen. Then a yellow, larger version popped up. As the distance closed further, the brake and backup lights of the stopped car began to flash automatically. At the same time, a red warning appeared inside the moving car to signal danger.

At what seemed to be the last moment, automatic braking kicked in and stopped the moving car quickly and safely.

Drivers said the cars communicate over a 5.9-gigahertz bandwidth allocated by Congress in 1999 for vehicle safety systems.

The same V2V system is also used as a blind-spot warning system by the demonstration vehicles.

Donald Grimm, a GM senior electronics researcher, said the system is potentially far less expensive than equipping individual cars with radar sensors dedicated to blind-spot detection. The system, updated 10 times per second and active up to about 500 feet away, can give plenty of warning to prevent a driver from merging into an occupied lane.

Spinoff benefits

Other future spinoffs of such technology could revolutionize driving, said Larry Burns, GM's vice president of r&d and planning. "It's going to reshape the industry," he said during an interview at the demonstration.

If vehicles are able to communicate with one another, many traffic control devices could become a thing of the past. Delays and fuel waste at stoplights could be significantly reduced, and the cost of roadway infrastructure could come down, he said.

A car-connected network of electronic information could give future dialed-in vehicles an automatic advantage. Setting speeds along the road is one possibility. Traffic also could be tailored so that more cars can safely occupy the same stretch of road.

Those advances are far in the future. But Burns said more immediate safety is possible with a surprisingly small number of cars equipped with V2V capability -- 5 to 10 percent, or about 23 million passenger vehicles in the United States.

Not every car in that fleet would need to have an active version of the V2V system, either. But minimal penetration would lead equipped cars to form mini-networks of connected vehicles that, in turn, could regulate the behavior of many other drivers close to them.

http://www.autoweek.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20061031/FREE/61030011/1024/TOC01ARCHIVE&CFID=10232342&CFTOKEN=48543146
 

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Cone Killer
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Sounds all good...playing the devil's advocate....what stops them from using that information for other purposes. Think about it, if car can talk to each other, well the can pass info from one to an othether and then relayed to a base station receiver somewhere on the road....like traffic lights.

So say now you have a nav/bluetooh, now they have location based services, phonebook, etc.

Yeah, Big Brother watching conspiracy theory...but it can happen.


I mean, just look at the black boxes discussion in another thread. Well no you just made it that much easier to transmit all that information real time.
 

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Übercargeek
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Discussion Starter #7
You make some excellent points.

In other words, V2V combined with black boxes can lead to major "Big Brotherization" of our driving. That's NOT a good thing.

And, in a loosely-related comment, I read on Autoblog that, if Hillary Clinton winds up being the Democratic presidential nominee, that she would favor rolling back the speed limit to 55 mph as a "fuel conservation measure". Here's the link to the story:
http://www.autoblog.com/2006/05/24/hillary-clinton-pushes-for-reinstatement-of-national-55-mph-limi/
 

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Cone Killer
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jruhi4 said:
You make some excellent points.

In other words, V2V combined with black boxes can lead to major "Big Brotherization" of our driving. That's NOT a good thing.
Yeap, even now, a colleague of mine, he works in Atlanta, and goes out to Road Atlanta on a regular basis with his 3-series. The dealer expressed concern about the long periods of time at WOT recorded by the black box. They actually started questioning what he was doing, and warned him that racing would void his warranty.

jruhi4 said:
And, in a loosely-related comment, I read on Autoblog that, if Hillary Clinton winds up being the Democratic presidential nominee, that she would favor rolling back the speed limit to 55 mph as a "fuel conservation measure". Here's the link to the story:
http://www.autoblog.com/2006/05/24/hillary-clinton-pushes-for-reinstatement-of-national-55-mph-limi/

OK, just for that dumb ass commnent, there is no way in hell I would vote for her!!!!!
 

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Übercargeek
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Discussion Starter #9
METEORO said:
Yeap, even now, a colleague of mine, he works in Atlanta, and goes out to Road Atlanta on a regular basis with his 3-series. The dealer expressed concern about the long periods of time at WOT recorded by the black box. They actually started questioning what he was doing, and warned him that racing would void his warranty.
BMW is pulling this garbage? That's insane!

Reminds me of this old Roundtable thread:
http://my.is/forums/showthread.php?t=221170

That thread reminds me of the irony of Mitsubishi cracking down on AutoXers while Subaru during the "bugeye" WRX years actually included a year's SCCA membership with each car, and now sponsors "Subaru Challenge" AutoXes throughout the country. I went to one a couple of weekends ago and it was a total blast, that included a buffet dinner the night before, grab-and-go breakfast, buffet lunch and unlimited beverages during the day and free posters, all for the price of a regular local AutoX ($30).
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Is the next twist in V2V actually V2S (vehicle-to-sign)? It could be, according to Autoextremist:

From the "Hell Really Is Freezing Over" File comes word that Siemens, one of the world's largest electronic companies is now the brand spanking new headquarters of the No Fun League, apparently. The company has developed a system that prevents a motorist from going over the posted speed limit (gulp). Using an on-board camera placed near the rearview mirror that "reads" speed limit signs, the system then feeds the information to a computer, which then restricts your speed to that exact posted limit - no exceptions. It can even read a speed limit sign that has been altered by spray paint vandalism. In order to activate the system, you have to have the cruise control engaged, but still, Siemens says a European manufacturer (who will remain nameless, probably for good reason) is planning on adding the system as an option in a couple of years. Wait a minute, No Fun League (check), electronic overkill (check), technology for technology's sake (check) - we think we have a real good idea who that manufacturer is...read below...

The article that follows the above is a rant against Mercedes-Benz's new marketing direction in Europe. And knowing their penchant for more and more electronic gadgets and gimmicks, I'm not surprised it would be them.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Another V2V article from WardsAuto.com

GM Mulls Equipping Product Portfolio With V2V Technology
By Herb Shuldiner

EAST RUTHERFORD, NJ – General Motors Corp. rolls out part of its experimental vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication fleet for a press demonstration here.

The auto maker, which currently has 12 V2V prototype vehicles – eight in the U.S. and four in Europe – is considering equipping its entire product portfolio in five to seven years with the new system, says Patrick Popp, GM’s director-global body and safety electronics.

GM demonstrates its in-house technology here with a Cadillac CTS equipped with V2V, as part of the National Highway Traffic Safety Admin.’s 3-year program to develop and evaluate vehicle-to-vehicle communications systems.

The overall effort is part of NHTSA’s Intelligent Transportation Systems Program. Participating auto makers provide 20% of the project’s total cost.

Popp says V2V has a sixth sense that allows drivers to react and take evasive action more quickly than today’s vehicles permit.

The technology enables a vehicle to broadcast its location and monitor the positions of hundreds of other cars nearby with the same capability 10 times every second.

The broadcast range is about 984 ft. (300 m) – or roughly three times that of traditional radar. The technology also provides a lane-change warning system to prevent crashes with vehicles in the driver’s “blind spot.”

GM’s V2V system uses a transceiver that operates on a 5.9 GHz spectrum; a dedicated antenna; and a controller microchip that is the brain of the system. Existing building blocks such as Stabilitrak electronic stability control and OnStar roadside assistance complete the system.

Popp says this holds down the cost of the system, but he declines to estimate what the actual retail price would be when it becomes available in production cars early in the next decade.

V2V can “see” around curves and larger vehicles in front of the driver’s vehicle. It communicates vehicle position, speed and heading. The most exciting feature is the ability to prevent collisions with vehicles directly ahead or behind that can’t be seen in side or rear-view mirrors.

When a V2V-equipped car approaches the back of another vehicle, the forward crash avoidance component activates: A safety protocol alerts the driver and prevents a collision.

It starts with a green icon displayed on the instrument panel that represents the vehicle in front at a safe distance ahead. As the second car closes in, the icon turns yellow.

Then, with about 30 yds. (27 m) left between the two vehicles, the icon turns red and simultaneously the front of every seat position begins to vibrate strongly enough to awaken drowsy or distracted drivers.

If all these warnings fail to get the driver to take evasive action or brake when the gap between vehicles diminishes to two car lengths, the system automatically brakes the approaching car to a stop before a collision can occur.

The press demonstration here performed this with a car traveling 25 mph (40 km/h). It takes a lot of discipline for the driver performing the test to keep from manually turning away or braking.

Popp says today’s sensors that provide some crash avoidance elements are very expensive, have only single-purpose applications and require line of sight. Additionally, achieving 360-degree coverage adds complexity and cost and makes the technology only affordable for high-end vehicles.

GM researchers are working to bring down the component costs and also eliminate the need for direct line of sight. “If an obstacle is around a curve, radar can’t pick it up,” Popp says. “But V2V communications can.”

OnStar provides global positioning satellite capabilities to the vehicle. And when satellite coverage is lost, Stabilitrak enables the system to determine position with dead reckoning, he says.

Once the chip controllers become more affordable, they can be located anywhere in the vehicle. “But it’s best if they are located close to the antenna,” Popp says.

The 5.9 GHz spectrum the Federal Communication Commission has assigned to the dedicated short-range communication protocol project has 10 channels reserved for commercial applications.

Popp says some channels can be used for diagnostic and infotainment duties. However, there is no intention to give the system black-box capabilities that continuously track vehicle performance and position.

Both the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and the Society of Automotive Engineers are coordinating the research and development efforts of all the auto makers belonging to the Crash Avoidance Metric Partners consortium, which in addition to GM includes Ford Motor Co., DaimlerChrysler AG, Toyota Motor Corp. and Honda Motor Co. Ltd.

NHTSA also is helping to drive standardization of the system.

However, other auto makers have varied approaches to the vehicle-to-vehicle communication system. DC calls its system a vehicle information infrastructure.

Not every vehicle on the highway will need to be equipped with the communication technology in order for the system to be functional.

As long as there are some cars ahead of a V2V vehicle, or in its blind spots, the technology is operable, Popp says, adding V2V can run with penetration rates of as little as 5%-10%.

GM Mulls Equipping Product Portfolio With V2V Technology
 

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Deus Vult
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So Mercedes-Benz makes some of the most powerful (and gadget-laden) automobiles in the world, and they might be partner in a program that keeps people from speeding? Doesn't make much sense to me. Also, who are they to say how fast we drive?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
A brief update from GM on The Car Connection website

GM Wants Cars to Talk – To Each Other
Safety rises when cars communicate, GM says.
by Richard Yarrow

Vehicle-to-vehicle communication - where cars silently talk to each other about traffic conditions further down the road - is on the way. That's the view of bosses at General Motors, who have revealed the latest details of their futuristic V2V system.

Here's how it works: if there's a broken down car round a blind bend, your vehicle will know about it before you get there because one coming the other way - having already passed the blockage - will have spread the word. You get a dashboard warning and don't plow into the back of the stationary machine.

But it can also warn of a police car responding to an emergency in the vicinity. By displaying where it is in relation to you, it allows you to get out of the way quicker. Another example of V2V is what GM calls Intersection Collision Warning, where a vehicle approaching a blind junction would know if others were converging on the same spot, hopefully preventing an accident.

V2V works using sat-nav, a microprocessor and the type of wireless Local Area Network (LAN) technology that's standard in most new home computers. The information is transferred in milliseconds and each car has a communication range of up to 500m. It means even if there was nothing coming the other way, you'd know of the stranded vehicle in plenty of time. As well as improved road safety, reduced journey times - by re-routing you around hold-ups - are the key benefit.

Most major car makers are working on V2V and to a set of basic parameters and protocols so future cars will all be speaking the same language. But Bruno Praunsmändel, GM Europe's group manager for advanced engineering, admitted V2V will only work efficiently when the vast majority of vehicles have it. "With safety-critical technology like this you need more than 90 percent of vehicles involved to see some impact on the accident statistics," he said.

He added that if all carmakers started now it would be 10 years before that occurred, and they're not ready to go just yet. A four-year trial will begin in Germany in the autumn, with all the local manufacturers involved and the support of the Government. It will involve several hundred cars, and will also test how best to deliver the information to the driver.

GM Wants Cars to Talk – To Each Other - The Car Connection
 

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Discussion Starter #14
V2V evolves into the CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium

Car 2 Car working to create vehicles that can talk to any other car, not just Bimmers
by Jonathon Ramsey - Autoblog



Thirty different auto manufacturers and technology companies are partners in a group called Car 2 Car Communication Consortium. The point is to create cars that talk to each other -- but instead of swapping secrets only with other cars of the same brand, the group wants to create vehicles that can speak to any other car, truck, or motorcycle on the road.

As one would expect, there are a number of things needed to successful implement the idea. The most important hurdle has just been cleared with the announcement that all parties have agreed on the European radio frequency that vehicles would would use to communicate. Ultimately, the consortium wants to create the ability for a Car 2 Car equipped vehicle to warn any nearby vehicle of an icy patch on the road, or for a motorcycle nearing an intersection to notify you while you're behind the wheel. Now that the consortium has a common channel to use, it only needs to decide on a common language. Esperanto, anyone? Here's the full press release:

PRESS RELEASE

INFORMATION EXCHANGE BETWEEN VEHICLES FOR MORE SAFETY IN ROAD TRAFFIC

10/24/2008: BMW Group Research and Technology shows the current development status.

Munich/Dudenhofen. Networking between vehicles from different manufacturers forms the basis for future driver assistance systems. The key focus for the BMW Group is enhancing driver sovereignty and the active safety of all road users. As part of the international forum of the CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium, BMW Group Research and Technology demonstrates how BMW automobiles and motorcycles will be able to exchange information with vehicles from other manufacturers in the future.

Networked cars communicate with each other and with the road infrastructure using WLAN. This provides fast and early information about potential hazard situations and events in road traffic. Information exchange between cars especially at the end of tailbacks, at accidents or in icy road conditions can avoid accidents or at least reduces their consequences.

BMW Group Research and Technology has been involved in the CAR 2 CAR Communication Consortium right from the start. The consortium has grown from four partners at the start to a group of more than 30 partners. Two conditions need to be met in order to fully exploit the potential of Car-to-X communication systems with nationwide deployment: A joint technology platform needs to be agreed for defining standard interfaces and a uniform radio frequency. The recently approved 5.9 GHz frequency band for applications of Car-to-X communication represents a key milestone for standardisation in Europe - as already in USA and Japan.

The vehicle manufacturers involved with the forum use cars, trucks and motorcycles to demonstrate traffic situations when Car-to-X communication provides drivers with specific support, for example, in built-up areas where motorcycles or emergency vehicles are approaching cross-roads. Car-to-X communication is also particularly effective at roadworks or in situations where vehicles have broken down.

For more information: Willkommen bei Car2Car : News

Car 2 Car working to create vehicles that can talk to any other car, not just Bimmers - Autoblog
 

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BMW will be implenting a V2V system on all of their next generation vehicles. For example, if there's traffic ahead, the car will send a signal to all the other BMW's in the area and warn them that they need to slow down due to traffic up ahead. It can also tell them that it's raining and they'll need to use their wipers soon. V2V systems will be the next generation of safety equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Denso steps into the fray

Denso Steps Up V2V Field Testing
By Tom Murphy - WardsAuto.com

The proliferation of smartphones, Blackberries and iPads demonstrates the intense desire for people to communicate with one another and within a few years, vehicles may be similarly connected.

Denso is demonstrating its “vehicle-to-vehicle” (V2V) technology with two prototypes, a Cadillac SRX and Lexus LS 460, equipped with dedicated short-range communications (DSRC) modules that use GPS satellite links and wireless data allowing the vehicles to share information.

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Denso International America’s Roger Berg, vice president-wireless technologies, describes the systems as similar to WiFi, but for vehicles and with no link to the Internet.

The DSRC module, about the size of a laptop computer, has a range of about 900 ft. (274 m), which is significantly wider than radar-based systems delivering about 200 ft. (61 m) in range in adaptive cruise-control systems, Berg says.

The goal is to establish a safety cocoon around an equipped vehicle so a driver can be warned of a hazard ahead, or of another car speeding through an intersection that is not yet visible.

During a demonstration in the parking lot of Denso’s North American headquarters here, the technology works as advertised.

As the Lexus creeps blindly forward from between two parked SUVs – and into the path of the approaching Cadillac – a series of loud beeps and visual warnings on the central display screen prompts the driver to hit the brakes immediately, preventing the car from being T-boned.

Another demonstration has the Cadillac sitting idle at a stop light. When the Lexus approaches too quickly, similar warnings are given.

Although a number of high-end luxury vehicles already integrate radar-based collision-avoidance technologies, the point of V2V is to make the communication link a 2-way street, allowing occupants in both vehicles to be aware an accident is imminent, by calculating current and future positions.

Some systems now in production enable the vehicle to brake automatically, even before the driver has taken action.

Berg says vehicles using V2V technology can be tweaked to deliver the same level of intervention.

“With more than 30,000 people a year killed on our nation’s roads, we need to keep looking for new ways to improve safety and reduce fatalities,” U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood says in a press release announcing further government testing of V2V.

The U.S. Department of Transportation has selected the University of Michigan to conduct a road-safety field trial in Ann Arbor, MI, using V2V devices in everyday vehicles in a real-time environment.

The Connected Vehicle Safety Pilot will be conducted between August 2012 and August 2013 and include installation of the wireless devices in up to 3,000 vehicles to evaluate their effectiveness.

The field test will take place on the streets and highways of Ann Arbor. DOT will collect data from the vehicles in order to understand how different types of motorists respond to safety messages.

Denso’s demonstration also allows equipped vehicles to communicate with “smart” intersections, thanks to transmitters attached to the traffic-signal controller.

“This way, we can see where we are in relation to the intersection,” Berg says. “We get information we wouldn’t have otherwise,” such as the distance to the intersection before the light will change.

In this respect, the technology can improve fuel efficiency by allowing a driver to coast to the stop light if he knows how long it will stay red, or to maintain steady speed if he knows how long it will remain green.

Denso’s technology offers the driver a “suggested eco speed” so the driver knows whether he can make it through the intersection.

The U.S. government’s safety pilot follows driver clinics being held throughout the nation. The first was Aug. 8 at Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, MI.

When its research is complete, the National Highway Traffic Safety Admin. is expected to decide in 2013 whether V2V technology is ready for commercial application for light vehicles, and by 2014 for heavy commercial vehicles.

Berg says Denso’s technology could be ready for market in the 2013 timeframe. He says it’s too early to discuss pricing of the device and won’t say whether the cost could be comparable to an in-dash navigation system or a premium audio system.

He says the goal is to be cost-competitive with radar-based collision-avoidance systems already in production. Denso also is working on an affordable V2V system that can be retrofit on existing vehicles.

Several competitors are proving out the technology, including Robert Bosch, Continental, Delphi and TRW, as well.

Berg welcomes the involvement of rivals, so V2V can gain acceptance more rapidly. Having a handful of vehicles so equipped serves little purpose, he says. The viability of the technology requires widespread application across millions of vehicles and at thousands of intersections.

Denso Steps Up V2V Field Testing
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The U.S. government tests, and considers eventually mandating V2V

Feds test car-to-car communication
NHTSA: System may save lives and could soon be mandated

By David Shepardson
Detroit News Washington Bureau

The head of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says new "vehicle to vehicle" communications could eventually help save thousands of lives, and the agency is considering new regulations in 2013 to eventually mandate the technology.

At the SAE World Congress here Thursday, NHTSA Administrator David Strickland said such regulation could "create a baseline communication system" to help prevent traffic accidents, which cost the nation tens of billions of dollars each year.

NHTSA is conducting a major test of "vehicle to vehicle" technology. As an example of that technology, the driver of one vehicle could be alerted that another is about to run a red light — potentially avoiding an accident, Strickland noted.

"Our research shows that these technologies could help prevent a majority of the collisions that typically occur in the real world, such as rear-end collisions, intersection crashes, or collisions while switching lanes," Strickland said.

Toyota Motor Corp. Spokesman Brian Lyons said the company thinks vehicle to vehicle technology "shows a lot of promise."

"The connected future really does hold a tremendous amount of promise," he said, adding that some of the technology simply is awe-inspiring.

The Transportation Department is using 2,800 vehicles in the Ann Arbor area to further test connected vehicle technology in a year-long effort running this summer through summer 2013. The model deployment also will test a limited number of vehicle-to-infrastructure applications as well.

Scott McCormick, president of the Plymouth-based Connected Vehicle Trade Association, said rulemaking could take two years or more — and would likely initially focus on mandating vehicle to vehicle communication for safety messages. McCormick thinks by 2020, 25 percent of all vehicles on the road could have the technology.

Hideki Hada, general manager of integrated vehicle system at the Toyota Technical Center, said the technology shows great promise and is aimed at vehicles learning "the intention of the other vehicle."

The technology has been proven at the individual level, and tests in Ann Arbor will hopefully show "final confirmation that the entire system works."

NHTSA has said that connected vehicle technology could eliminate up to 80 percent of vehicle crash types involving non-impaired drivers. "We need to make sure we get things right," before a final decision is made on whether to go forward with a regulation, Strickland said.

Feds test car-to-car communication | The Detroit News | detroitnews.com
 
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