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Hey eveyone. I was just wondering what the thoughts of using 0W-30 oil is. Right now i am using 5w-30 (mobil one). Also, when i first got my car, the oil was clear, the first time i lifted the dipstick i thought that Lexus forgot to fill it. Now its a lot darker, this obviously can be attributed to use, but even not used oil isn't as clear. But anyways, i mainly want to know about 0W-30, how much better it is, how long it lasts. etc.
 

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0W-30 is great in warm climates. I just switched to it from 5W-30 (still M1 Tri-Synthetic) and noticed that not only does the engine rev easier but I also get about 3-5mpg better gas mileage (a big plus for you IS owners!). Give it a shot next time you change. You do *not* want to run this in the winter time (any temps below 45 degress or so) as this oil is extremely thin. You may also notice that you burn some of it (I find that I'm about 1/4 qt. low every 2-3 weeks). That's completely normal.
 

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Originally posted by webguyIS:
0W-30 is great in warm climates. I just switched to it from 5W-30 (still M1 Tri-Synthetic) and noticed that not only does the engine rev easier but I also get about 3-5mpg better gas mileage (a big plus for you IS owners!). Give it a shot next time you change. You do *not* want to run this in the winter time (any temps below 45 degress or so) as this oil is extremely thin. You may also notice that you burn some of it (I find that I'm about 1/4 qt. low every 2-3 weeks). That's completely normal.
Huh?????
 

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thin oil can cause added motor wear. i would only use it if i could find it in a race version, where the oil won't break down as easy as normal oil.
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but don't warmer climates require thicker oil? 10W30?
I think 0W30 should would work better in low temp.
I was told that a car must be broken in using conventional oil. Otherwise it may start eating oil later on. I put M1 5W30 on 1200 miles. I don't notice too much oil consumption.
 

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Yes, you are correct! 0W-30 should only be used during winter because its a thin oil. If you use this during the summer and the viscosity is too low, it will be metal against metal and no lubrication so becareful. I'm not sure about what the IS300 manual says but my Prelude manual says to use 5W-30 period. 10W-30 is also acceptable if the climate tends to be very very hot. However, try to avoid oil ratings that have too big of a margin of difference. To obtain this difference they use additives which is not oil but chemicals that WILL harm your engine.
 

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Oils now-a-days are multi-viscosity oils. The first number is the winter rating. 0W means that it is extremely thin in the cold. 5W is a bit thicker, although not too much. 20W is pretty thick stuff. The last number, 30, 40, whatever, is the HIGH temp rating. The oil will conform viscosly to the operating temperature of the oil. The only thing you're going to notice with a thinner oil (0W/5W) is smoother startups, smoother idling, and better gas mileage because the oil will not thicken as quickly. The fact is that 0W-30 and 20W-30 reach the same high-temp level of viscosity, so it's not going to damage your engine or anything.

The reason you should use a thicker (5W) oil in the winter is because you don't want an EXTREMELY cold startup to occur with all your engine in the oil pan. So you use a thicker oil that stays up top in the head and block area and throughout the oil system. Cold startups like that are bad no matter what oil you use, hence block heaters for those crazy cold Canadians.

Manufacturers generally recommend 5W30 or 10W30 because they are oils that can be used all year round in basically any climate.
 

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Originally posted by webguyIS:

The reason you should use a thicker (5W) oil in the winter is because you don't want an EXTREMELY cold startup to occur with all your engine in the oil pan. So you use a thicker oil that stays up top in the head and block area and throughout the oil system. Cold startups like that are bad no matter what oil you use, hence block heaters for those crazy cold Canadians.
You don't make sense at all......

[ April 30, 2001: Message edited by: dude ]
 

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Originally posted by webguyIS:
Oils now-a-days are multi-viscosity oils. The first number is the winter rating. 0W means that it is extremely thin in the cold. 5W is a bit thicker, although not too much. 20W is pretty thick stuff. The last number, 30, 40, whatever, is the HIGH temp rating. The oil will conform viscosly to the operating temperature of the oil. The only thing you're going to notice with a thinner oil (0W/5W) is smoother startups, smoother idling, and better gas mileage because the oil will not thicken as quickly. The fact is that 0W-30 and 20W-30 reach the same high-temp level of viscosity, so it's not going to damage your engine or anything.

The reason you should use a thicker (5W) oil in the winter is because you don't want an EXTREMELY cold startup to occur with all your engine in the oil pan. So you use a thicker oil that stays up top in the head and block area and throughout the oil system. Cold startups like that are bad no matter what oil you use, hence block heaters for those crazy cold Canadians.

Manufacturers generally recommend 5W30 or 10W30 because they are oils that can be used all year round in basically any climate.
LOL!!! What kind of thinking is this? Oil will drip back down to the oil pan leaving little or no oil at all at the top of the motor...that is why thinner oil is needed for the winter time so when you start the car up, the oil pump can pump oil around the motor easier....

 

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You guys are as confused as a roach in an Irish dance festival..It doesn't know where to run.Plain and simple kiddies..0W for the cold weather.It rises quicker through the engine. And 10W for warmer weather.
 

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You guys are as confused as a roach in an Irish dance festival..It doesn't know where to run.Plain and simple kiddies..0W for the cold weather.It rises quicker through the engine. And 10W for warmer weather.
 

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Ahahaha, holy crap. I am sorry guys, I don't know wtf was wrong with me. Aside from my 3rd-degree sunburns and the fact that I posted that after being awake for 19 hours straight (autocross yesterday), I guess I must have somehow rationalized to myself that my earlier post was correct. Oops.


LOL I'm re-reading that and just chuckling. My apologies again for the misinformation. But yes I'm still using 0W-30, it's never friggin hot here anyhow.
 
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