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Discussion Starter #1
Opinions on which one to get?

Advantages of each? Disadvantages?

Also, has anybody tried a mix of both (LS400 front, TT rear?)

Advantages of each? Disadvantages?

Thanks.
 

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stock is really all you need, they make actually performance pads for the stock setup now. simple and effective. not gonna lie. high carbon blank rotor with gloc/carbotech pads.

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Unless you do HPDE or track events fairly consistently, there really isn’t a need to switch up. You can buy a better brake pad and rotor combination even in stock form. This goes for the front and back brakes.

LS400 fronts would be my choice ONLY if you actually do HPDE or extended track outings. Rears can be left alone. The stock IS300 front caliper is completely capable of stopping the car with upgraded pads and rotors.
 
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Unless you do HPDE or track events fairly consistently, there really isn’t a need to switch up. You can buy a better brake pad and rotor combination even in stock form. This goes for the front and back brakes.

LS400 fronts would be my choice ONLY if you actually do HPDE or extended track outings. Rears can be left alone. The stock IS300 front caliper is completely capable of stopping the car with upgraded pads and rotors.
the ls400, I believe, is inferior to the tt. 1) rotor size 2) straight vs directional vane 3) cast aluminum vs cast iron. only draw back is the weight of the tt setup. but after 8 track days my brakes barely look worn. dusty af, but still looking mint!

my ideal setup is the ls430 caliper--aka TRD monoblock.

but I agree, unless you do any track or HPDE events, stick to stock.

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Discussion Starter #5
the ls400, I believe, is inferior to the tt. 1) rotor size 2) straight vs directional vane 3) cast aluminum vs cast iron. only draw back is the weight of the tt setup. but after 8 track days my brakes barely look worn. dusty af, but still looking mint!

my ideal setup is the ls430 caliper--aka TRD monoblock.

but I agree, unless you do any track or HPDE events, stick to stock.

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Hi Black,

Good to know. Is the TT significantly more expensive than the LS400 set-up? I think I'd be able to do the latter for around 500-1000. As for upgrading, I'd like to go all out on this build. In finished form it will be a gift to my girlfriend, who swears by BMW :/. That may be a while though.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Unless you do HPDE or track events fairly consistently, there really isn’t a need to switch up. You can buy a better brake pad and rotor combination even in stock form. This goes for the front and back brakes.

LS400 fronts would be my choice ONLY if you actually do HPDE or extended track outings. Rears can be left alone. The stock IS300 front caliper is completely capable of stopping the car with upgraded pads and rotors.
The only HPDE I do is speed everywhere. As for your sig, my best friend had a 06 C55 AMG when we were teenagers. He wrecked it, but it was a great car. Wouldn't having the rears alone with an upgraded front lead to some sort of braking bias?
 

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The only HPDE I do is speed everywhere. As for your sig, my best friend had a 06 C55 AMG when we were teenagers. He wrecked it, but it was a great car. Wouldn't having the rears alone with an upgraded front lead to some sort of braking bias?
No. If you actually upgrade to LS400 brakes or TT brakes you will actually gain a slightly (probably not noticeable) INCREASE in pedal travel. Your stock MC bore size was specifically designed to be used with your stock brakes. If you go and start adding 4 pot calipers up front and larger calipers rear, then you will be hurting your system rather that making it better. As black and I have both said. Stock brakes with upgraded rotors and pads will do just fine. Especially for what you’re doing with the car.

I get it, people want to look at big brakes and say whoa! However I’m a HUGE function over form guy. If it isn’t helping, then pass on it. Don’t get me wrong though. TT brakes or LS400 would provide more braking potential as they are larger and have more surface area and better heat shedding abilities but they will be heavier and require just a bit more pedal effort to get that consistent stopping power.

I am selling my Mercedes soon, I’ve had it for far too long now.
 
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the ls400, I believe, is inferior to the tt. 1) rotor size 2) straight vs directional vane 3) cast aluminum vs cast iron. only draw back is the weight of the tt setup. but after 8 track days my brakes barely look worn. dusty af, but still looking mint!

my ideal setup is the ls430 caliper--aka TRD monoblock.

but I agree, unless you do any track or HPDE events, stick to stock.

Sent from my Pixel 4 XL using Tapatalk
I think the TT rotor stock for stock is slightly bigger than the LS400 (little less than 3/8” of an inch)

I don’t think the TT rotors are directionally vaned stock. I think they are both straight vaned rotors. It’s been a minute since I’ve looked at them though. Of course you can buy directionally vaned TT rotors aftermarket if he goes that route.

the LS430 caliper is indeed a nice caliper! Also glad someone here recognizes how to utilize a stock braking system to it’s full potential before automatically just going for the largest calipers in the world to try and fit to their cars. Thought I was alone in the world.
 
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tt rotors from the factory are directional vane. supra tt was one of the best 60-0 cars of it's time.

tt rotor is only 11mm bigger than the ls400, however that's where you gain the most surface and mass/weight. with increased mass/weight it's double edged. more heat capacity but more unsprung and rotational mass. if stock is300 rotors were directional, a performance pad would have been more than enough. but after eight 20min sessions, my stock setup was cooked.

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tt rotors from the factory are directional vane. supra tt was one of the best 60-0 cars of it's time.

tt rotor is only 11mm bigger than the ls400, however that's where you gain the most surface and mass/weight. with increased mass/weight it's double edged. more heat capacity but more unsprung and rotational mass. if stock is300 rotors were directional, a performance pad would have been more than enough. but after eight 20min sessions, my stock setup was cooked.

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Unsprung weight is definitely a negative. My setup is stock. I don’t track my car though. Do you run stock rotors? Are there not any aftermarket rotors? By cooked you mean you’re boiling brake fluid or your rotors are done?
 

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Unsprung weight is definitely a negative. My setup is stock. I don’t track my car though. Do you run stock rotors? Are there not any aftermarket rotors? By cooked you mean you’re boiling brake fluid or your rotors are done?
yeah so id advise you to stay stock. blank rotors and street pads. at the time I had a factory set up less than 15k miles on the car (got it used with 14k) I did swap over to ate fluids which did boil over and my pads were past the minimum and my rotors were glazed beyond anything I could do to recover them. I did pull the fog lights for increased air flow but I doubt that even mattered, our cars are 3200+ lbs. gl hf.

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I made my own brackets to fit IS350 F sport ones with stock pads and can't tell the difference from the standard calipers with Green Stuff pads fitted in braking performance or the pedal travel (as a daily driver). I have a few of these cars and can't feel any difference between the F sport brakes or stockies with better pads. There is have almost no brake dust several months later, which might be why there is a lack of grip, I didn't check what pads they were fitted with. The F sport set up is about 3 or 4 kg heavier having the 330 mm dia stock Lexus discs, even with the lightweight alloy calipers. There is a 17% increase in rotor area over a IS300 stock one. I was surprised at the outcome and was a bit unimpressed and would just fit good pads instead for a road licensed car next time.

New discs have better grip for a few days until the pads bed in and the discs get polished from the pads, that was the only difference and a temporary one. I wanted the biggest brakes I could find, without bling colours, without spending lots of cash and still be able to keep a 17 inch rim for the better handling. A pencil still fits between the caliper and the stock Lexus IS250/350 rims fitted, original stock rims touch the side of the caliper with the spokes. This could be fixed with a 2 or 3mm spacer on the wheel hub between the brake disc and the rim. It was cheaper to do an Fsport conversion using second hand parts purchased locally, than to buy the Figs Eng TT adaptor due to our poor foreign exchange rate plus postage.

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It took me an afternoon to fit a stock F sport set up. You need the stock F sport caliper bolts for the caliper (they are longer to reach through the adapter plate, shown in second picture), a bench drill, some 8mm plate, an angle grinder, paint, machine a spacer of identical thickness to the lower stock mounting ear and two nuts from the end of a stock shock absorber shaft, which use the same thread as the original stock brake bolts plus two small dia washers to suit for the lower mounting ear. Trim the dust shields and swap the brake hoses at the back of the caliper. I had to trim a small bit off the lower mounting tab on the alloy caliper. The shock absorber nut is smaller in diameter and reduces the trimming necessary to fit it in with a flat side towards the caliper, this was the only fiddly time consuming job. Measure three times and cut or drill once. The stock brakes will swap straight back in as they were originally and unchanged if needed.
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My advice if you after appearances, is to just buy some of the plastic brake caliper covers off ebay.
 

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Opinions on which one to get?

Advantages of each? Disadvantages?

Also, has anybody tried a mix of both (LS400 front, TT rear?)

Advantages of each? Disadvantages?

Thanks.
The rears work fine as they are on a IS300. "Its all about the front end", which is 100 kg heavier than the rear with a stock car and about 135 kg heavier with a turbo kit fitted. Add stickier tyres and there is an even greater weight transfer to the front when braking until the ABS cuts in. These same brake systems and part numbers are fitted as standard on some of the JDM factory turbo 1JZ cars and very likely other Toyota factory turbo'd cars as well (lack of time to research for more).

The pad numbers are the same for the 2JZ twin turbo Supra up to 2002 (JZA80), Aristo, V8 GS430 up to 2011, the Aristo AWD 4.0L sedan, Corona, Chaser, Celsior, Altezza, Gita, IS200, IS300 and many others. Most of these cars have a factory turbo option on the 1JZ or 2JZ motors using these pads, I used Part No DB1395GCT. The 2011 Lexus GS430 is a 1700kg car with a wonderful braking system.

The stock brakes, shocks etc are good quality, its a Lexus, definitely not a Chev, Chrysler, Ford or a cheap import. Lexus sources quality parts for their cars. I got a shock when I realised that new stock shocks are as good as Bilsteins. The Bilsteins felt good when installed as they lower the car a bit and were replacing already worn out standard shocks.

The stock rear brakes work well on mine and that includes for towing gear around, the rear hasn't felt under braked. The stock brakes are quite good (even the stock pads aren't too bad), unless your racing it. If just wanting an improvement. I would use the stock front caliper with the figs adaptor and the bigger diameter TT discs, maybe different pads, you don't even have to disconnect the caliper hose if you don't want to while your doing it. There are some very strong 2JZ's over here using them on their IS300 daily drivers and recommended it to me. I went another way as I often do, which worked as well, but still needs the pads to be sorted out as they might not be stock ones.

Diameter rules for disc brakes, greater diameter is more leverage from the pads for the same pressure applied, with more cooling, but unfortunately more weight with iron rotors. Maybe there are higher spec and lighter rotors for the TT's out there somewhere? Just had a look at Figs and unfortunately the adaptors are no longer available. Pity as with their lightweight TT rotors and the adaptor, its an improved Supra TT set up, as we share the same pads in our calipers.
RHD Japan sell a few different adaptors for different rotors and calipers that suit the IS300. They might be listed as fitting a SXE10 or GXE10 which are the generation Lexus IS200 versions not sold in the US, same brakes, they came up while searching for lightweight TT rotors, picture below.
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If your racing it, then how fast do you want to spend? Figs Eng are a good starting point.

Some of the brake adaptors being sold for our cars on this forum or ebay, are not well done and if I bought a car with them fitted, I would be binning them.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi all,

It seems with every post that is answered I have more questions. Guess it's all you guy's enthusiasm and knowledge. Thanks!

It seems as if the consensus for now is to upgrade only the rotors and pads?

As for tracking, eventually the goal is to have my own somewhere in the middle of nowhere with a couple of planes and a decent sized hangar. However, with all the furloughing going on in the aviation industry due to corona, that will probably be some time off (as if I didn't have enough already).
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I made my own brackets to fit IS350 F sport ones with stock pads and can't tell the difference from the standard calipers with Green Stuff pads fitted in braking performance or the pedal travel (as a daily driver). I have a few of these cars and can't feel any difference between the F sport brakes or stockies with better pads. There is have almost no brake dust several months later, which might be why there is a lack of grip, I didn't check what pads they were fitted with. The F sport set up is about 3 or 4 kg heavier having the 330 mm dia stock Lexus discs, even with the lightweight alloy calipers. There is a 17% increase in rotor area over a IS300 stock one. I was surprised at the outcome and was a bit unimpressed and would just fit good pads instead for a road licensed car next time.

New discs have better grip for a few days until the pads bed in and the discs get polished from the pads, that was the only difference and a temporary one. I wanted the biggest brakes I could find, without bling colours, without spending lots of cash and still be able to keep a 17 inch rim for the better handling. A pencil still fits between the caliper and the stock Lexus IS250/350 rims fitted, original stock rims touch the side of the caliper with the spokes. This could be fixed with a 2 or 3mm spacer on the wheel hub between the brake disc and the rim. It was cheaper to do an Fsport conversion using second hand parts purchased locally, than to buy the Figs Eng TT adaptor due to our poor foreign exchange rate plus postage.

View attachment 135407 View attachment 135408 View attachment 135409 View attachment 135410 View attachment 135411


It took me an afternoon to fit a stock F sport set up. You need the stock F sport caliper bolts for the caliper (they are longer to reach through the adapter plate, shown in second picture), a bench drill, some 8mm plate, an angle grinder, paint, machine a spacer of identical thickness to the lower stock mounting ear and two nuts from the end of a stock shock absorber shaft, which use the same thread as the original stock brake bolts plus two small dia washers to suit for the lower mounting ear. Trim the dust shields and swap the brake hoses at the back of the caliper. I had to trim a small bit off the lower mounting tab on the alloy caliper. The shock absorber nut is smaller in diameter and reduces the trimming necessary to fit it in with a flat side towards the caliper, this was the only fiddly time consuming job. Measure three times and cut or drill once. The stock brakes will swap straight back in as they were originally and unchanged if needed. View attachment 135412
View attachment 135413
My advice if you after appearances, is to just buy some of the plastic brake caliper covers off ebay.
If I was after appearances I'd have to buy myself a stock mustang/camaro, straight pipe it, turbo whistle, and upbadge it. I would be "that guy".
 
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