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I was reading that they had a trd solara which ran 0-60 in 5.5 secs, which I think is blistering fast. Thats faster than a mustang gt and that doesn't even include other simple engine modifications really. Now, the stock manual solara hits 0-60 in 7.1 secs while the automatic IS300 hits 0-60 in 7.1 secs. So when the TRD supercharger comes out you shoud basically hit the same time. I was also reading at the Rod Millen store that you might not want to go or wait for the manual to come out for the IS300, because they did a manual transmission test on a GS model and compared it with the E-shift and they said that the E-shift switches gears faster that basically anyone can shift with a manual and it also allows you to take it even to redline. The only advantage with the standard is launching. But with the 218 torque already in the IS300 and when combine with the supercharger I don't think it would really make that much of a bigger difference. I just thought I give some info for the people who can't decide between the two transmissions or just can't wait for the new IS300 to come out.

Small question? what exactly is a torque converter and what does it apply to.
 

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The problem with an automatic is not shift speed, it's the torque converter, you lose a lot of power due to friction losses. It weighs more too. So the manual transmission car will be faster even if the E-shift is faster at shifting.
Besides, people like manuals cause the clutch gives them better control, and manually shifting makes the driving experience more involving. Plus it typically costs $1000 less. Think that about covers it.
 

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Perhaps these pedals will help with heel-toe manueuvers if a manual version becomes available? Automobile magazine (June 2000) reported a rumored 5 speed version arriving on our shores in about a year. However, after witnessing the manual tranny in a GS in drive mode or using the steering wheel-mounted shift buttons, you may not want a manual. After all, the automatic will take the engine to redline and shifts quicker than most drivers anyhow!

They mean that unlike most Tiptronic-like devices ie Audi's Lexus will hold to the redline, although I doubt it shifts quicker than most people... but you still get bad mileage compared to a manual or CVT.
 

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You can always buy an upgraded torque converter if you feel like shelling all the money out for it. The only basic difference i see about the eshift and manual is the launch also...with manuals you can rev up to where you can get peak hp and torque and just dump the cluth. But with the auto you have to push on the gas AND the brake to keep you from not moving. Although the e-shift maybe shift a little bit faster...i doubt the lauch would be as good as a manual launch
 

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All power goes through the torque converter, not just during launch. That's why automatics are always slower than manuals, at all speeds. Less driveline loss with a manual. An upgraded torque converter will help, but can't possibly be as good as a manual. Unless it's a hydraulic clutch like the Ferrari or Alfa Romeo Selespeed.
 

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ckolsen seems to know his "stuff" pretty well, but we haven't answered Nick's question...

A torque converter basically obviates the need for a clutch (thus an automatic transmission has only two pedals).

The torque converter looks like a doughnut with a rod through the middle. When the engine spins the "input" side (at idle) the output side doesn't spin, but as the engine revs faster, viscous fluid inside the "doughnut" collects on the outer edge due to centrifugal force and it starts to spin some blades/vanes which are connected to the output side.

This "fluid coupling" offers some benefits and drawbacks (over a clutch+manual).

benefits:
1> You don't have to use a clutch
2> There is no clutch disk to wear out.
3> You can rev the engine to a point where it is in a good torque band even if the car is moving slowly. Autotrans are good if you want to push or pull a really heavy load. Like if you are pulling a really heavy trailer up a hill - the autotrans (torque converter) keeps you from stalling and helps you get the engine making power even when you are having trouble getting the vehicle to move. The torque converter helps you creep up steep hills without stalling the engine. I would much rather have an autotrans in stop and go traffic on the hills of San Francisco.

drawbacks:
1> You waste some energy (efficiency) by "treading water (fluid)" thus gas mileage is typically lower.
2> You feel a delay and a "disconnected feeling" between the throttle and the acceleration of the vehicle.
 

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TEG there is no such thing as centrifugal force. Centripetal force is the current idea in uniform circular motion. Who knows, maybe they'll prove themselves wrong and go back to centrifugal in 10 years or so...=)
 

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Sorry - I haven't gone to school in 17 years (thank god...)

The next thing you know they will tell me that world isn't flat anymore!
 

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Ok - here is the idea - you stick a big spoon into a bowl of water which is sitting on a slippery countertop. You spin the spoon around and around faster and faster. The water starts to spin and eventually the bowl starts to spin (if it doesn't find a lower friction bowl). Centrifugal, Centripital, whatever...

I guess they don't use a "centrifuge" in science anymore? It must be a "centripuge" now!
 

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Good point, even though its kind of a physics semantics issue. But in some free-body calculations, you need to apply a force which is due to a body's inertia, and the 'centrifugal force' is used. But you're right that the force doesn't really exist, it's just inertia.
 

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I thought the SC was the only lexus to have a stick. Interesting.
 

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Thanks Daniel. Who are they? What do they do/offer? Are they officially affiliated w/ Toyota/Lexus? I don't know anything about aftermarket modifications...

Thanks
 

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Yes, they are part of Toyota. In fact, they are the one who build and test Champ Car and Toyota Atlantic engines, the Rod Millen Celica engine ( I don't know about the new Tucoma engine), and also many of the R&D of the racing parts. I have visited them around 4 or 5 times since they are just down the street from me, and last time I was there they were testing a champ car engine and you can hear the engine at 17,000 rpm and the smell of methanol. Very cool facility.
 
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