Lexus IS Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I've had coolant disappearing for months now. I've suspected the water pump was dying. At 88k miles, I didn't want to wait much longer. Just some quick thoughts.

Parts
====
I opted to go cheap and buy the Dayco idler pulley for $20. It is slightly wider in diameter than the Toyota pulley. And it will not work with the Toyota washer, because it will bind. You will need to buy a flat washer. The whole replacement Dayco unit mounts it with a flat washer.

I wasn't sure the VVT intake cam oil seal was the same as the exhaust side. It is. It was a slight concern of mine.

Not sure if my local dealer was hustling, but list prices were significantly higher than I saw posted on here from others. I asked if Toyota had raise prices, and the response was yes. I did have a 25% coupon but it still wound up about $60 more expensive than online locations.

Removal
======
Took me about 3 attempts on the crank pulley bolt and a strong friend and two pipes (sourced from 2 floor jack handles) I bought the Schley 64300 tool. Worked great. On the 3rd attempt, I rotated the crank around so that the tool pointed upwards out of the engine bay. That way my helper was standing and using upper body strength.

I needed a puller to remove the crank pulley and the crank gear off the crankshaft. I reused the bolts from the Schley tool to work with my puller for the pulley removal. The crank gear uses 6x1.0mm bolts.

The VVT cam gear mounting bolt was extremely tight. I had to use the pipe trick on it to break it free (with a helper too of course)

It's very labor intensive to get to the point of removing the intake valve cover. I highly recommend replacing the spark plugs and wires while you're in there.

Cam & crank seals. I didn't have time to get a Lisle 58430 oil seal removal tool. So I used my compact Makita to drive in some sheet metal screws into the oil seals. For the crank seal, it created a hole big enough for my pliers to fit into. And I just yanked it out. For the cams, I drilled a few in and pulled on the embedded screws until they popped out. Of course, extreme care must be used doing this. First, you can smash in your condenser radiator. Second, you can hurt yourself. Third, you can scratch the cam / crank.

Problems found:
============
Cam seals both leaking slightly
Water pump leaking
Timing belt look liked it might be fraying a bit
Timing belt idler pulley bearing had play in it
Serpentine idler pulley bearing had major play in it

It's a very labor intensive job! Hope the reassembly goes smoothly.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
most parts can be had at a toyota dealer for a cheaper price.

i got my timing belt idler pulley (koyo $25) and waterpump (complete front and back/aisin $105) from an online retailer that ive been using for a few years now.

i was hoping i wouldnt have to replace the front seals... i guess i will have to see how they are when every things off.

putting it back together is always easier, goodluck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts
most parts can be had at a toyota dealer for a cheaper price.

i got my timing belt idler pulley (koyo $25) and waterpump (complete front and back/aisin $105) from an online retailer that ive been using for a few years now.
Got a link?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
I'm worried about the VVT intake cam/gear position. As I moved the cam around slightly trying to loosen the cam gear bolt. Gonna read the service manual and see if there are marks to line up the cam lobes correctly.
actually ive never taken the vvti cam gear off. thats my concern too at the moment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Slide hammer!

For the cams, I drilled a few in and pulled on the embedded screws until they popped out. Of course, extreme care must be used doing this. First, you can smash in your condenser radiator. Second, you can hurt yourself. Third, you can scratch the cam / crank.
Technique update: when installing the new seal, I slightly dented it. So I replaced it with another new one. This time, I drilled a screw in and use a slide hammer on the screw. Worked really well and less dangerous than tugging on the screw with pliers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
935 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Intake Cam Timing

So I was stressing thinking I messed up the cam timing on the VVT cam since I moved the camshaft a lot when loosening the cam gear bolt. But after looking at the setup, and reinstalling the belt. Everything is lined up and makes sense!

Each cam gear is keyed to the cam, so you can't reinstall the gear clocked incorrectly to the camshaft.

Ahhhh! But now how do you know the assembly is truly @ TDC?

The VVT cam gear rotates its outer portion by 30 degrees. So first fully rotate the gear CCW. Now with the intake valve cover off, rotate the camshaft until the VVT cam gear "o" mark is lined up to TDC on the timing belt back plate cover.

Now to verify you're @ TDC, rotate the VVT outer portion through 30 degrees. You should go from the "o" mark to the "|" mark. Cycle back and forth a few times. And it should be pretty obvious at full travel of the VVT gear -- "o" to "|" should hit the same exact TDC mark on the back plate.

When installing the timing belt: be sure that the VVT cam gear outer portion does not move as you slide the belt over the teeth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
All done! It's running great. Less belt and bearing noise. In my eagerness to test run the engine, I forgot to plug in the crank position sensor. Threw an engine code. Make sure you have an OBD2 reset tool if this happens to you.

Also be sure to put the water pump drain hose behind the belt tensioner. It will rub on the crank pulley otherwise.

A little disappointed in the Dayco pulley. It was making some hideous noise, so I tightened it even further and the noise went mostly away. It's making me nervous, so I might just fork up the $150 for a new Toyota assembly.

Also the crank pulley bolt must be torqued tight! Torque specs exceeded my big torque wrench. So I used the same setup when loosening it to tighten it. Surprisingly it turned slightly with the big pipe extension. Make sure yours is tight!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
The VVT cam gear rotates its outer portion by 30 degrees. So first fully rotate the gear CCW. Now with the intake valve cover off, rotate the camshaft until the VVT cam gear "o" mark is lined up to TDC on the timing belt back plate cover.
Sorry to bring this back but I'm trying to line up my intake cam gear right now and this is the only place I've been able to find instruction on how to do it. So, I make sure the gear is fully CCW on the cam when aligning it with the sub-timing or pre-timing mark? Can anyone confirm this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
288 Posts
It doesn't matter where the actual cam position is, as long as the mark on the VVTi gear is lined up with the mark on the backing plate. As soon as you start up the engine, the cam will be pulled into the right position. The gear is what needs to be properly positioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
It doesn't matter where the actual cam position is, as long as the mark on the VVTi gear is lined up with the mark on the backing plate. As soon as you start up the engine, the cam will be pulled into the right position. The gear is what needs to be properly positioned.
Thanks man. You have no idea how long I've been looking for an answer to this because I'm still having problems with my car. It makes sense since the gear is hydraulically controlled that the cam position would equalize at an equilibrium point IF the oil control valve is working correctly. Guess the OCV is my next suspect then.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top