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Discussion Starter #1
I'm toying with the idea of having Castrol Syntec used instead of regular oil at my 5K service next week. Is anyone else planning to do this? Any good reasons to wait 'til 10K? I assume it will cost an extra $25 or so - true? The cars running great now (knock on wood), will it run better?

Does any of this matter in the great universal mystery we call life?
 

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synthetic oil is always better than natural(someone said the worst synthetic is better than the best natural) so if you dont' mind paying more go for it
 

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Synthetic is the way to go. Royal Purple is something I would be interested in because it was tested at Jackson Racing and it actually increased power to the wheels on a dyno. Pretty cool, basically free power since the car needs oil anyway...might as well go with one that frees up power.

But no, the oil you run is not really that big a deal in the universal mystery we call life. Although I guess it depends what is important to you in your life.
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Omae no jinse sore de ii no ka
 

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My 5000 mile inspection is coming up and I'm considering switching to synthetic. The car runs great and if there is room for improving the longevity and efficiency of the engine, then I may take that step. Anyone out there been running synthetic in their new cars (whatever they may be) and have reviews on its affects?
 

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Heard that MOBIL 1 has a good sythetic oil, too. DTPLINK, Why are considering Castrol? Just curious. Don't know if there are any differences.
 

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Right after I got my IS300, I called Lexus and asked if synthetic oil would void the warranty, they of course said "no." But they added, "we do *not* recommend synthetic oil."

I'll probably just stick to good regular oil and change it every 2500-3000 miles (I'm leasing).
 

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We have just started to use synthetic in one of cars for last few oil change. We've been hearing good things about using synthetic oil so we thought we would try using it (even the cars are kind of old now).

From what I observe, other than it's more expensive than regular mineral oil. The engine seems to run more smoothly and keeps the smoothness longer. The engine is more quiet when reving. A bit more power, especially on highway. We don't need to dig as deep to get the acceleration going. There is a noticeable (albeit, subtle) improvement. Nothing dramatic, mind you. But the difference is there. (Especially if you park outside in sub-zero winter condition, the start-up is better).

But there are conflicting suggestions out there about whether synthetic should be used before the car is broken-in. Something about mineral oil contains elements that can help the engine break-in. Although I think Porsche has synthetic in their new cars.

So I guess I would suggest, wait until the car is broken-in and then use synthetic if you don't mind paying a bit more.
 

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Why would Lexus not recommend synthetic? Maybe they hope your car will wear out faster with dino oil. Synthetics are far superior to dino oil.
 

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that's weird. I believe Longo Lexus uses the Mobil 1 synthetic oil. I used it before on my eclipse and it is good.
 

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HIBBoyScott,

Check that article about Royal Purple @ Jackoff Racing again.. but if I recall, they were testing like standard 10W-30 mineral oil against Royal Purple's 0W-10 racing synthetic oil or something like that..

But for the record, I believe in synthetic oil and yeah, you should wait until the motor is pretty much broken in before using it.. and speaking of break in, you guys should change your oil shortly after taking delivery to get the crap out of the motor (crap, such as metal particles, assembly lube, assembly worker's cigarette butts, etc)..
 

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I remember in an old forum about oil someone saying that synthetic oil is not recommended for the first oil change because you want the engine to get broken in and synthetic is too smooth and doesn't allow for proper break in.

ELS
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, I think the question I have is not if I whould use synthetic - 'cause I'm convinced that if you are going to play with a performance car you want to get every edge you can (afford/justify). But when to start. I think I'll probably wait 'til 10K and toss a coin for Mobil1 or Castrol Syntec.
 

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i used mobil1 in my GSR. it definitely revved up faster. i will most likely switch to synthetic at the 5000 mi. service. redline oil is good if you want to pay premium.

mike
 

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It's quite contradictory to know that Lexus do not recommend synthetic oil at the first scheduled oil change coz` I remember seeing a FAQ on their web site, ie. http://www.lexus.com that it's okay.

I would definitely use synthetic oil as I have done to my previous cars. The results were pretty good.

Due to the characteristics of the IS engine, I will have to rev to 4000rpm more often than before, though I will try to keep it low due to milege concern/engine wear. Anyway, synthetic oil seems to provide a better protection to a engine at high temperature than the conventional oil. So I think it would justify more to use synthetic oil on the IS than some other cars.

I used Mobil-1 at one time and the switched to AMSOIL. It has been great.

So I think I would continue to stick with AMSOIL. The one I used is the 2000 series, 0W30.

I probably would use convention oil at my first and second oil changes (2500km, 5000km)and switch it to synthetic at the first Lexus recommended oil change. Then when my IS breaks the 10k KM mark, I will add Slick 50 Synchron to it.

Just my thoughts..
 

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Dawg, this is that article that I read. I don't think it says anything about the weights of the oils. I didn't re-read it to carefully though.
---------------------------------------------Can oil make power? This is a question that has been kicked around the office quite a bit recently. As the editorial staff went into "think tank" mode coming up with concepts and ideas for the "Free Horsepower" article on page 64, lubrication and the effect of less friction on power production was debated at length. Coincidentally, during this time Oscar Jackson of Jackson Racing was testing lubrication products on the dyno at his Westminster, California shop. Skeptical like some of our staff was, Oscar decided to let the dyno numbers speak for themselves. Two test sessions were planned. The first would test transmission gear oil and the second would reveal the power potential of performance engine oil.
The product in question was Royal Purple, a 100-percent synthetic oil available in a variety of viscosities to provide optimum performance for everything from stock engines to heavily-modified turbo-nitrous applications. Royal Purple is formulated with Synerlec(TM) which allows Royal Purple to put a stronger film of lubrication onto engine parts creating a good deal less friction and, consequently, gains in mileage and power. Royal Purple also claims its lubricants will keep engines clean, provide better wear characteristics and lower emissions. The question at hand, however, is--will it make power?

Our test subject was a Toyota 22RE-powered pickup with air conditioning and power steering. On the dyno, baseline figures registered 95.7 horsepower after the vehicle was driven to heat up the transmission. Adding the Royal Purple, the vehicle was taken on the same pre-run course and strapped to the roller. Surprisingly, power jumped to 97.6 horses, nearly a two-horse increase.

This piqued Oscar's curiosity, and we all anticipated the engine oil evaluation. Back on the DynoJet, four quarts of the Royal nectar was poured into the engine of a 1988 Honda CR-X, and the dyno was once brought up to speed. Again, not expecting to see anything, the DynoJet registered a 1.1-horsepower increase to the wheels. The oil used in this test was Royal Purple Racing 9. The other oils in the Racing series--Racing 11, Racing 21 and Racing 41 feature different viscosity levels as illustrated in the accompanying chart.

It makes sense that an engine with less friction fighting against its internal parts would make more power. The engine oil test performed here was on a relatively stock powerplant. As the power ante is raised, the positive impact on output will also increase. We plan on testing synthetic oils on some higher output applications, but this exercise illustrates that oil can make power.
 

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AndyL, have you tried Prolong Superlubricant before? It is one of the better engine additives out there right now. I have experiment its spray lubricant on stuff like slide windows and it work great. Try it if you are thinking about adding stuff like slick 50.
 
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