Lexus IS Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,375 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
just have questions for people who store their cars over the winter:

do you leave e-brake on? do you leave car in gear? add any fuel additives? leave window(s) open? disconnect battery?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,215 Posts
i store my car actually for like 4 months at a time due to the fact that i live half way around the world, but next year will be a different story due to the fact that i'll be moving back to the states or maybe canada for college. Besides that all i do is close the windows lock the doors and put a sheet over the car. When i get back i have the car check not serviced just check to make sure everything is ok, including wheels oil blah blah blah then off i go and enjoy the ride.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,375 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
ok, it will be in a semi temp controlled garage with a cover on it. i was just checking to make sure the e-brake doesnt lock up, or anything liek that. thanks fellas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,215 Posts
i actually find my car more sensitive after being stored after a while
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,141 Posts
For 30 days I wouldn't do it, but if it was a couple months, I would also jack up the car to get the weight of the tires, or you will get flat spots.

I personally wouldn't put the e-brake on. One of my old cars the e-brake cable locked up, so the first day I wanted to drive it, I ended up working on it, instead of driving it.

As for fuel, for 30 days you will be ok, but Sta-bil or Seafoam is around $5, so to ease your mind, it might be worth it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
I store my Viper GTS over the winter. (The IS is my DD beater) Here is a list of
winter storage tips that I use and can be applied to the IS: (lifted from the VCA site)

For those new to hibernation:

***********************************************

As winter approaches, proper storage practices will insure that your IS will be the same car you remembered it to be when you last drove it.

Engine and such…
If you’re due for an oil change, now is the time. Same for antifreeze. At minimum, verify it’s protection level. Brake and clutch fluid is another nice pre-winter maintenance item, especially if you’ve tracked the car recently or if it’s been more that two years since last flushed. Verify that your windshield washer fluid has suitable low temperature protection. Fuel should be topped off to minimize condensation and fuel stabilizer (Sta-Bil) added then run /drive the car long enough to get the fuel stabilizer distributed throughout the system.

This isn’t to suggest that you should rebuild your car every fall, just that if these items are due, pre-storage is a great time to do it.

Body & interior
Wash, thoroughly dry and if possible wax the car prior to storage. Pay particular attention to the wheels as you do not want the corrosive brake dust eating your nice rims all winter. I highly recommend using a good quality car cover. Placing a clean cover over the clean body minimizes the risk of scratches. The interior should be vacuumed and all leather cleaned with a suitable cleaner / protector. Once cleaned, I leave both windows open a crack under the car cover to relieve pressure on the weatherstripping and to vent the interior, however if rodents are an issue, seal them up and place a few dehumidifying packages placed on plastic on the floor of the car.

Location & method
You’ll need to account for the characteristics of storage location, like the before mentioned rodent prevalence, moisture levels, access to electricity (for battery float charging) etc. Mice love stored cars and will find a way to get either inside of it or under the hood and then chew wiring, so a few well placed traps might be prudent if you’re storing in a location they’re known to inhabit.

Moisture is your enemy too, so putting a layer of plastic sheeting down and then parking the car over it will prevent the moisture that permeates the cement floor from condensing on your frame.

Your tires will flat spot if left in the same position over time but you shouldn't have to worry too much about them, that was a problem in old ply tires. You might get temporary ones after winter storage, but they'll work themselves out after the first drive.
To minimize that occurrence, drive up over a tire sized pads of plywood, covered with a plastic door mat or remnant of old carpet. This in combination with inflating the tires to 44 PSI (or whatever the sidewall maximum is) will help the tires stay true.

Our cars will drain the battery . If you have winter access to electricity, a Battery Tender ( http://www.batterytender.com ) charger or similar is mandatory. There are many “trickle” chargers out there, but over time a trickle charger will boil away your electrolyte, leaving you with a dead battery in the spring. The Battery Tender charger will not. I plug mine into a surge protector to isolate the car’s electrical system from the AC lines, just in case. I’ve also hard wired in the connector to the under hood positive jumper and frame ground in order to make the Battery Tender connection easy and fool proof.

If you do not have a tender or access to electricity you’re left with 2 options. Starting the car every 3 weeks or so (not recommended) or disconnecting the battery completely and periodically charging it manually.

Since the bulk of engine wear occurs at startup, I am of the belief that minimal over winter starting is best. If once every six weeks or so I get a particularly warm day, I start the car to recoat the cylinder walls and move fore and aft a bit to shift the tire position. Some really cold years though, I don’t start it at all. Do whatever feels right to you. If you do start it though, it’s important to let the engine fully warm up in order to evaporate any moisture that’s in the oil and exhaust system. No cold revving and watch the ambient temperatures if you’re using a thicker than stock oil. Since the car is running, I'll back the car out of the garage to coat some lubrication on the dfferential.

I use my parking brake religiously therefore it’s always operable. If you use it infrequently, you might want to try it a few times to loosen it up prior to winter storage. Assuming the car is dry, using it over the winter should be no problem. If you prefer not to, be sure to securely block the wheels. I do not leave the car in gear over the winter because the rubber insulating boot underneath the leather shifter boot will take a set and make the first day or two of spring driving a bit odd as the set rubber resists as you shift into in any gear other than the one it was in all winter.

Winterization Checklist:

• Full fuel tank
• Gasoline stabilizer added
• 44 psi tire inflation pressure
• Plastic sheet completely under car
• Tires resting on plywood and carpet to minimize flat spots
• Fresh engine oil, possibly brake and clutch fluid too
• Engine antifreeze level verified
• Windshield washer antifreeze checked
• Clean interior and exterior, then cover
• Battery Tender connected
• If needed, mouse traps and dehumidifier bags placed, otherwise windows opened slightly

Spring Checklist:

Don’t forget to adjust the tires before driving and observe the inflation pressure prior to adjustment. Are they all tires equal or is one low? Could be a slow leak that’ll require watching.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
did anyone ever store their car for more than a few months? i plan on moving to japan for a year or two and i would really love to keep my car. anyone ever store any cars for more than a year?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
174 Posts
hey i store my car away for most of the summer from june to august and i just start it and let it run for a couple of minutes every now and then, thats about it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
zensokuryoku said:
did anyone ever store their car for more than a few months? i plan on moving to japan for a year or two and i would really love to keep my car. anyone ever store any cars for more than a year?
The amount that your car would depreciate in those 2 years would make it not worth it to do that. Just sell the car before you move, and buy a new one when you get back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
142 Posts
speedyj88 said:
The amount that your car would depreciate in those 2 years would make it not worth it to do that. Just sell the car before you move, and buy a new one when you get back.
i really could care less about depreciation. I want my car to be in as good shape as i can have it when i get back simply because i enjoy this car and i would like to keep it for a very long time, regardless of whatever cars i buy in the future. Its a simple matter that i really like the specific one that i have and i don't think i would be able to find one that would fit my liking when i come back. thanks for sharing though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,215 Posts
zensokuryoku said:
did anyone ever store their car for more than a few months? i plan on moving to japan for a year or two and i would really love to keep my car. anyone ever store any cars for more than a year?

I live in the philippines for high school and i go back to the states every xmas and summer sofar just parking it in a clean garage and everything is fine. I do suggest that yeah clean ur car before you leave, vacume, detalinging ect. Cover ur car to simple methods and some common sense is all u really need to do imo, doing what RAY from NJ said yeah nothing wrong with that to, but to me a lil overboard but then nothing he has mentioned shall harm ur car so do as u wish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,788 Posts
+rep for some good info

Ill be putting my car in storage this winter
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top