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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if the is350 wheels would cause problems if I put them on a AWD is250. I tried looking answers on line but couldn't find a direct yes or no answer.
So is it possible to do just by swapping them or would need to to extra? Thank You
 

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I was wondering if the is350 wheels would cause problems if I put them on a AWD is250. I tried looking answers on line but couldn't find a direct yes or no answer.
So is it possible to do just by swapping them or would need to to extra? Thank You
Yes they'll cause a problem.

There's a reason Lexus doesn't offer those wheels on the AWD model.
 

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^^What he said. AWD systems don't like staggered setups.
 

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225 40 18 front tires be aight just need to change the rear size and your good to go on the AWD. For everyone that say it can be done it has and been done. AWD is not a true 50/50 ratio more of a 30/70 meaning 30% to the front axle and 70% to the rear axle.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanx for the help guy.. Just need to find the wheels for a good price and try it out.
 

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As stated above, yes you can as long as the overall diameter is the same or very close to. I run staggered fitment wheels on my Celica All-trac without a problem. :)
 

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Please note the OP is asking about the IS350 RWD 18" wheels.

These are not the same diameter front and back (assuming OEM tires).

There's nearly a full inch of difference in overall diameter.

That's why they're not offered on the AWD model.
 

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this staggered wheels on AWD topic has been beat to death on pretty much every lexus forum I can imagine. yet there always seems to be conflicting opinions as to if its doable or if will blow your AWD system and center differential to bits....so I decided to do some research on this matter and approach it from a more educated prospective. The general consensus on AWD seems to be that all 4 wheels like to spin at the same speed as much of the time as possible or else you will have an overworked center differential and increased wear. The easiest way to make this possible is obviously by making all for wheels the same size with the same size tires as well, in order to maintain specs between these wheels as identical as possible. Now we all know that on a microscopic level, this is impossible, that is, to be EXACTLY the same size..minor differences do to manufacturing and tread wear will always exist no matter what you so...therefore it is safe to conclude that there is a margin for error on AWD systems or else youd be in the shop every month and AWDs wouldnt sell for sh!t. The major reason manufacturers dont do staggered wheels on AWDs is to avoid any kind of potential liability towards them if some damage where to occur with the awd system, it couldnt be blamed on that. But yes it can be done, most supercars like Lamborghinis come factory with AWD and staggered wheels on a WAAAAAAY more expensive and sophisticated awd system. Y do that if it wasnt safe??
Another thing to consider is the only way you could keep all four wheels spinning at the same rate would be to drive in a straight line forward or backwards, never turning. this is pretty much impossible your since ur steering wheel is constantly turning corners, changing lanes etc. while driving around town. during any turn, ur inner wheels will always spin slower than your outer wheels as well as front to back...thats what a differential is for, to allow wheels to spin at different speeds while under power. It would be idiotic to say that you will damage your awd drive staggerring your wheels because it will make the differential do exactly what it was meant to do. So yes, as long as your rolling diameters from front to back are as close to identical as possible, the differences will be small enough for your differentials to compensate without any increased wear.
As far as the difference in traction due to a larger contact patch in the rear from a staggered wheel...well think of it like this...even if ur front wheels was 2 inches wide and the back were 50 inches wide, if the rolling diameter is the same front to back and all four wheels are contacting dry pavement, they will all turn at the same speed (again, in a straight line front to back) no matter how slow or fast you are going. Now on the other hand, if you are constantly trying to do burnouts or attempting to drift around corners (which given the cost of a Lexus and Lexus repairs, I dont think many owners do) meaning u are forcebly trying to get the wheels to slip, then yes you could eventually do some serious damage. Everyday driving will have no affect on this whatsoever.
So not to drag this out any further since I know half of you dont want to read all this, yes i do believe it is perfectly safe to stagger wheels on an AWD so long as you keep the rolling diameters on all four wheels as close to identical as possible, then go for it i say. Feel free to disagree, I wanna hear what yall have to say...educated of course please, not cuz ur cousin heard from his friend whose dads a mechanic at yadda yadda bingbang..facts mannn FACTS!! dueces
 

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Discussion Starter #10
this staggered wheels on AWD topic has been beat to death on pretty much every lexus forum I can imagine. yet there always seems to be conflicting opinions as to if its doable or if will blow your AWD system and center differential to bits....so I decided to do some research on this matter and approach it from a more educated prospective. The general consensus on AWD seems to be that all 4 wheels like to spin at the same speed as much of the time as possible or else you will have an overworked center differential and increased wear. The easiest way to make this possible is obviously by making all for wheels the same size with the same size tires as well, in order to maintain specs between these wheels as identical as possible. Now we all know that on a microscopic level, this is impossible, that is, to be EXACTLY the same size..minor differences do to manufacturing and tread wear will always exist no matter what you so...therefore it is safe to conclude that there is a margin for error on AWD systems or else youd be in the shop every month and AWDs wouldnt sell for sh!t. The major reason manufacturers dont do staggered wheels on AWDs is to avoid any kind of potential liability towards them if some damage where to occur with the awd system, it couldnt be blamed on that. But yes it can be done, most supercars like Lamborghinis come factory with AWD and staggered wheels on a WAAAAAAY more expensive and sophisticated awd system. Y do that if it wasnt safe??
Another thing to consider is the only way you could keep all four wheels spinning at the same rate would be to drive in a straight line forward or backwards, never turning. this is pretty much impossible your since ur steering wheel is constantly turning corners, changing lanes etc. while driving around town. during any turn, ur inner wheels will always spin slower than your outer wheels as well as front to back...thats what a differential is for, to allow wheels to spin at different speeds while under power. It would be idiotic to say that you will damage your awd drive staggerring your wheels because it will make the differential do exactly what it was meant to do. So yes, as long as your rolling diameters from front to back are as close to identical as possible, the differences will be small enough for your differentials to compensate without any increased wear.
As far as the difference in traction due to a larger contact patch in the rear from a staggered wheel...well think of it like this...even if ur front wheels was 2 inches wide and the back were 50 inches wide, if the rolling diameter is the same front to back and all four wheels are contacting dry pavement, they will all turn at the same speed (again, in a straight line front to back) no matter how slow or fast you are going. Now on the other hand, if you are constantly trying to do burnouts or attempting to drift around corners (which given the cost of a Lexus and Lexus repairs, I dont think many owners do) meaning u are forcebly trying to get the wheels to slip, then yes you could eventually do some serious damage. Everyday driving will have no affect on this whatsoever.
So not to drag this out any further since I know half of you dont want to read all this, yes i do believe it is perfectly safe to stagger wheels on an AWD so long as you keep the rolling diameters on all four wheels as close to identical as possible, then go for it i say. Feel free to disagree, I wanna hear what yall have to say...educated of course please, not cuz ur cousin heard from his friend whose dads a mechanic at yadda yadda bingbang..facts mannn FACTS!! dueces
I would have to say it was interesting on what you said, and would have to agree.
 

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Please note the OP is asking about the IS350 RWD 18" wheels.

These are not the same diameter front and back (assuming OEM tires).

There's nearly a full inch of difference in overall diameter.

That's why they're not offered on the AWD model.
Lol? Well Please note stagger = wide wheels in the rear than front
 

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225 40 18 front tires be aight just need to change the rear size and your good to go on the AWD. For everyone that say it can be done it has and been done. AWD is not a true 50/50 ratio more of a 30/70 meaning 30% to the front axle and 70% to the rear axle.
Power distribution is irrelevant here...it is actually a matter of wheel speed. As 4 or 5 of the guys on here said - DIAMETER MUST MATCH. If it doesn't you will have tires spinning at different speeds...something that will destroy a finely-tuned AWD system. I have heard and read that Lexus is not as picky as some other brands with this problem, such as Ford or Subaru, but you still want it as close as possible for the longevity of your drivetrain. Yes it can be done, carefully. Here's a link to a site that measures wheel diameters so you can find what sizes match:

Tire Size Calculator

Hope this helps if you're still trying to figure it out
 

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Please note the OP is asking about the IS350 RWD 18" wheels.

These are not the same diameter front and back (assuming OEM tires).

There's nearly a full inch of difference in overall diameter.

That's why they're not offered on the AWD model.
They are actually the same diameter...They are not the same width.
Diameter equals the wheel size (17", 18", 19" etc) and the staggered set up is based on wheel width (8", 8.5", 9", 9.5" etc) The 350's run wider tires in the back for the staggered setup, they are however the same size wheel diameter wise.

ok, back OT

As stated a few times already...

You CAN run staggered wheels on an AWD as long as the width difference isnt TOO extreme. Running an inch to an inch and a half difference between the fronts to the backs should be no problem as long as it is made up with the tire size.

You will have to get wider tires in front or narrow in the back to offest the difference in wheel width. Use the stretch look a little in the back and people will not be able to tell a difference that you are running different width tires to make up for the different width on the wheels.

This procedure "tricks" the car because it will have the same rolling differencial and wont throw off the Trac control etc. People have been doing this for a while on other AWD vehicles (Evos, Wrx/Sti) with no probs.

Im sure you already have accepted this as an answer, but just wanted to add another member saying YES you can run staggered on an AWD.
 

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I don't really see why staggering wheels with similar diameters would be a problem. Both wheels still spin the at the same rate. I would also assume that most people buy AWD for weather purposes and change their wheels to the stock wheels with snow tires in November or December.
 
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