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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I did all the work on my is300, I made a lot of permanently temporary solutions. Since I’m switching to a bottom mount log manifold, I figured it’s the perfect time to fix a few annoyances while I wait for my parts to get here.
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My oil air separator is just hanging about. There’s an oil leak somewhere I need to fix. And my ecu is just sitting on top of my intake manifold. The BOV is sitting where The stock ecu box is. I’ll be relocating it at some point and hopefully shove the ecu back into the stock location. So first thing will be getting the wiring a little bit neater.
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I depinned all the unnecessary stuff around the alternator. Turns out of everything in that area, I only needed 4 of the wires.
 

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GTE swap, CD009 trans, 62mm turbo
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I did this while building my car. Ended up costing me more money in the long run. It’s a slippery slope for sure. Glad to see you have a plan, it’ll pay off in the end.

edit: also put a filter/muffler on that boost control solenoid, while I’m at it. Get new abs lines, spooky to have squash unions in such a critical safety feature.
 

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What’s your build like? Got any more pics??
I de-bulked and then Tesa wrapped and loomed my harness too. It’s fun to go back and fix all the permanent temporary solutions. I really love DTM connectors when I am working on wiring lol.
 

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2001 AR5 Swap, Built NA-T, Standalone
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What’s your build like? Got any more pics??
I de-bulked and then Tesa wrapped and loomed my harness too. It’s fun to go back and fix all the permanent temporary solutions. I really love DTM connectors when I am working on wiring lol.
Tesa tape is such a perfect bandaid. I pretty much use it for everything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not sure what squash fittings are but the brake unions are perfectly safe and accepted as brake line repairs in states that do vehicle checks. They are not compression fittings if that’s what you’re concerned about. They’re double flared like the factory fittings.
As to the car, I don’t have any full vehicle pictures right now, but I have some of the engine when it was being rebuilt and the mess on the other side.
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As to the car’s specs:
~9.3 CR JE pistons
Manley rods of some kind ( Forgot which specifically)
King bearings throughout at STD clearance
Stock cam and heads
DW 1000cc injectors (not big enough)
Fluiddampr harmonic balancer
Stock oil pump
T56 Mag close ratio
OS Giken Triple disc (hate it, too grabby)
Steel one piece driveshaft
tilton hydraulic throw out bearing (amazing if you have a push clutch setup)
XS power FFIM (it doesn’t fit)
90mm Chevy throttle body
BRZ/FT86 accelerator pedal
Single fuel pump with kenne bell BAP
Stock ignition system
Flex fuel
eBay downpipe (doesn’t fit)
eBay turbo manifold (doesn’t fit my turbo)
eBay midpipe (fit really nice actually)
245 RT615k+ tires all around

Turbo is a borg Warner s362sxe. Wished I had a turbo speed sensor but from data logs it’s most likely push ~70 lb/min. Max boost depends on gear and ethanol but generally it’s 170kpa gauge. Full boost comes in at 4800-5000 rpm with my usual my usual e60. At 4000rpm it’s at 100kpa I think.

I have never dynoed it but it should be making around 550whp. It has done 100-200kph in 6.1s before with a 7200rpm redline. With my normal 7000rpm redline, it’ll comfortably do it in 6.6-6.8. With flat shift enabled, it’ll do 6.3.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Some more progress. I went through the pinout to ID all the unnecessary wiring. There’s quite a bit of those, almost half. Luckily I printed the pinout on paper because I accidentally pulled my VVTI connector out but I caught it when sorting through the wires. The connector crumbled to dust but at least I didn’t yank it out of the ecu. I’ll be waiting for some proper depinning tools in the mean time.
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Connector D had 4 wires that were necessary. Most of the wires were A/T stuff.

I also went through the unfortunate exercise of mapping the abs/trac pinout out of the 01 and 02+. The two system are very different unfortunately. I had hoped to “simply” repin the 01 abs/trac ecu to work. There are additional solenoids in the 02+, namely src2,srm2, and sm2. The 02+ also has a pressure sensor that the 01 doesn’t have. I don’t think that’s critical to the internal working of the abs pump module but the solenoids on the other hand, I have no idea. I don’t suppose anyone here does?
 

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2002 is300
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Heres some SC abs diagrams They should hopefully be close. You'll have to use a wiring diagram to figure out the wiring but thats how the abs unit is routed. You can probably figure it out. The 02 has stability control vs the 01 does not which is where the added stuff comes from.

 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think you misunderstood. I’ve already layed out the 01 abs/trac and most of the 02+ abs/trac ecu (without vsc since my car doesn’t have it, the abs/trac w/VSC pinout is different) before realizing a direct repin will not work unless I have a better understand of how the abs pump module works and what the abs/trac ecu is doing algorithmically. The 02+ abs pump itself has additional solenoid controlling whatever it’s controlling. The 02+ abs/trac ecu does something with those solenoids. The problem is what are they doing. That’s too much work for me to actually find out when a 01 abs pump is so cheap.
 

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What are you wanting to change the ABS wiring? Maybe I missed the reason. If it was me, I’d just replace the 01 ABS module with another stock one vs re-wiring with an 02-05 module. That sounds like a lot of work.

What ecu are you using?
 

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2001 AR5 Swap, Built NA-T, Standalone
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I saw someone with an SC300 fit a BW S369 on their Treadstone log manifold. I assume it's a little bigger than the S362 so it might just work out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Finally got all the unnecessary wires depinned. I used a random $8 key ring depinning kit from Amazon. Worked like magic. I isolated all the wires going to the interior. No sense in wasting wires already ran through the firewall.
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I also tried making a turbo heat shield. Not very pretty and doesn’t fit real well. It’s also aluminum so the parts where it contacts the housing might melt.
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Just a preliminary test. I’ve heard turbo blankets are particularly harsh on the turbo and oil. Not sure how relevant that is for a street car.

Regarding the sc300 and treadstone, I’m pretty sure the sc300 has more space in the engine bay versus the is300. Practically speaking, the sc300 is just a Supra.
 

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2002 is300
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The sc300 engine bay is much larger and can even fit a gte turbo setup. Idk about that aluminum heat sheild aluminum is pretty heat conductive. I wouldn't worry about running a turbo blanket. Just make sure you xhange your oil often and let your car idle down after drives. If you're worried you can throw in an oil cooler. Good work tho keep it up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Aluminum is thermally conductive for sure. There’s an air gap so it’s not touching except where it’s not shaped very well, primarily the edges. Aluminum is the best heat reflector that’s affordable and the air gap should keep it from overheating. Too hard to get the shape right though.

I’ve been running a turbo blanket up until recently. Took it on and off too many times. It didn’t really survive this time. Might just have to go back to another blanket. And definitely agree on the letting it idle down part. The oil has been fairly problem free.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Reconnected the battery to see if the car still works. Started and died. No idea what the fuel pump resistor did but the circuit needed it to work. If any one is curious, the fuel pump resistor is that metal heat sink chunk next to the driver side relay box, right behind the stock ecu. With that plugged back in, car works fine. Also got to test my canbus reader for the first time. Only had rpm and wideband readings set to display. Still needs a lot of work to display numbers nicely.
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Still better than paying $400 for the gauge-art/Haltech one to do way less.
 

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Reconnected the battery to see if the car still works. Started and died. No idea what the fuel pump resistor did but the circuit needed it to work. If any one is curious, the fuel pump resistor is that metal heat sink chunk next to the driver side relay box, right behind the stock ecu. With that plugged back in, car works fine. Also got to test my canbus reader for the first time. Only had rpm and wideband readings set to display. Still needs a lot of work to display numbers nicely.
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Still better than paying $400 for the gauge-art/Haltech one to do way less.
I beleive the fuel pump resisitor is a resistor used to feed the the pump 9v ish during low load to help the pump last longer but then kicks up to full voltage during high load. I know of some people that have bypassed it. You cant delete it but you can get rid of the resistor but you'll burn up the pump faster. Very cool gauge setup let us know how it works would be cooler then the typical 3 or 4 seperate gauges.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I beleive the fuel pump resisitor is a resistor used to feed the the pump 9v ish during low load to help the pump last longer but then kicks up to full voltage during high load. I know of some people that have bypassed it. You cant delete it but you can get rid of the resistor but you'll burn up the pump faster. Very cool gauge setup let us know how it works would be cooler then the typical 3 or 4 separate gauges.
I'm using the OE fuel pump circuit to trigger a relay. It's not actually powering anything power hungry. With the resitor disconnected, it runs for ~5 seconds then I can see fuel pressure dropping to 0.

The gauge setup is just a micro controller using a canbus transceiver to read the messages. Haltech's transmit protocol is fairly public. All the microcontroller does is parse all the can messages. Converting all the can ids and data packages into usable data is the hard part just due to how many channels there are. But that's only an issue if you want to capture the everything on the can network. I'm using the FlexCAN library so all of the black magic has been done for me already. I'll throw everything on github once I can get it to work reliably.

As for the hardware specifics, I'm using a Teensy 4.1, SN65HVD230 transceiver, and a ILI9341 display. This microcontroller is beyond overkill for this application, but it's great for running my crappy code at blazing speeds.
 

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You cant delete it but you can get rid of the resistor but you'll burn up the pump faster.
I believe you can either jumper the resistor out of the circuit, or you can snip the ecu wire that activates the fuel pump low speed relay. Or just run a lowside output from your Haltech to trigger a relay to the fuel pump < thas how mine is. This thread explains it better than I could.
 
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