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Discussion Starter #1
AutoBlog said:
Back in 2007, Chrysler sent something of a shockwave through the industry by announcing a new lifetime powertrain warranty program for nearly all of its cars and trucks. At the time, we wrote "the only fly in the ointment is that the new warranty applies to the original owner and is not transferable." Once the vehicle had been sold, the warranty reverted to a standard three-year/36,000 mile affair. According to the automaker, that minor nitpick caused a load of confusion amongst its buyers.

But there's new word from the Pentastar faithful over at Allpar that Chrysler is dropping its lifetime powertrain coverage in favor of a more conventional five-year/100,000 mile plan that's fully transferable from one owner to the next. The new warranty will reportedly cover all Chrysler, Dodge (minus the Sprinter van) and Jeep models and extends to the high-performance SRT models, fleet sales and police cruisers as well – vehicles the old lifetime program didn't cover.
REPORT: Chrysler dropping lifetime powertrain warranty to five-year/100,000 miles — Autoblog
 

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Always figured there was something shady about their Lifetime Powertrain Warranty.

Not much of a difference maker for the original new car buyer, who is going to buy and keep a Dodge for 5 years? They finally looked at the other side on how to sell their pre-owned vehicles, so the used-car buyer will be satisfied.


Hopefully this will help them sell some cars.
 

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Always figured there was something shady about their Lifetime Powertrain Warranty.

Not much of a difference maker for the original new car buyer, who is going to buy and keep a Dodge for 5 years? They finally looked at the other side on how to sell their pre-owned vehicles, so the used-car buyer will be satisfied.


Hopefully this will help them sell some cars.
My parents? They have a 95 Intrepid, original owners, 260K+ miles. My brother drives it at college.

They had a 1988 Dodge Dakota V6 5spd Sport up until maybe 3 years ago? When they donated it to a church camp that uses it around the camp. My mom was up there on a quilting retreat a month ago and said it was still being used.... 200k+ miles

1996 Chrysler Cirrus with 196k miles. My grandpa bought it new and my dad drives it every day.

1998 Dodge Dakota 5.2L V8, 160k+ miles My dads primary truck for fishing ect...tows with it all the time.

2005 Ram 5.7L 13k miles....for Fishing trips to Canada or if several his friends want to go with him around here. Hence the low mileage.

Chrysler builds good products if they are well maintained, which my parents vehicles always are. MOST people who buy domestics how ever feel that its a cheap piece of crap not worth maintaining. As such they only do oil changes and dont touch anything else until it becomes a problem. That was a nice thing about working at VW, people did their maintenance and didnt question it because they valued the vehicle.

Quite a few people who buy cars like a $12,000 Cobalt also tend to not have the money to put into maintenance thus leading to higher failure rates.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My parents? They have a 95 Intrepid, original owners, 260K+ miles. My brother drives it at college.

They had a 1988 Dodge Dakota V6 5spd Sport up until maybe 3 years ago? When they donated it to a church camp that uses it around the camp. My mom was up there on a quilting retreat a month ago and said it was still being used.... 200k+ miles

1996 Chrysler Cirrus with 196k miles. My grandpa bought it new and my dad drives it every day.

1998 Dodge Dakota 5.2L V8, 160k+ miles My dads primary truck for fishing ect...tows with it all the time.

2005 Ram 5.7L 13k miles....for Fishing trips to Canada or if several his friends want to go with him around here. Hence the low mileage.

Chrysler builds good products if they are well maintained, which my parents vehicles always are. MOST people who buy domestics how ever feel that its a cheap piece of crap not worth maintaining. As such they only do oil changes and dont touch anything else until it becomes a problem. That was a nice thing about working at VW, people did their maintenance and didnt question it because they valued the vehicle.

Quite a few people who buy cars like a $12,000 Cobalt also tend to not have the money to put into maintenance thus leading to higher failure rates.

Isn't that the case for any automobile though?
 

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Aside from the RX-8 yes.
 

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Sure is, read my supporting argument for why Domestics tend to fail though. Imports also have better PR departments.
Do you feel that people don't take care of domestics because they're cheap? I mean Get inside an 08 Chevy and it's a racket. We have a 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee and we've babied the thing.
 

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Do you feel that people don't take care of domestics because they're cheap? I mean Get inside an 08 Chevy and it's a racket. We have a 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee and we've babied the thing.
I feel, despite the actual quality, domestics have an image as cheap and unreliable. People tend to treat them as such. Perception is everything. Same thing with Hyundai, While Hyundai now builds extremely excellent vehicles they have problems with perceived quality issues. Their lower price also brings in a demographic that also typically has less money to spend on vehicle maintenance thus leading to greater problems in the long run.

Hyundai requires a certain level of maintenance to carry the warranty. From what I have seen as an adviser is that the vehicles that are maintained do not have issues where as the vehicles that are maintained dont see the same failure rates.

If I now relate this to VW, with say transmissions for example. VW never *requires* fluid replacement because they use a mineral based fluid that holds up to extended life cycles. As such maintenance cannot be blamed on the failure. In the case of say a 2001 Jetta with a 2.0L SOHC and automatic transmission if the clutch packs fail it is a known problem but the failure rate was not high nor widespread enough to warrant a recall or warranty extension. It is also not a failure that fluid change would have prevented. People also perceive the quality of a Volkswagen to be higher whether it actually is or not. The price is also generally higher for a comparable product so it generally draws a more well read and wealthier demographic (not to be read as rich people but some one making 60k a year is wealthier than some one making 25k) People that fit that demographic generally perform repairs immediately and perform maintenance as recommended by the manufacturer.
 
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