Lexus IS Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys, I thought this would help some people out that wanna save $500.
A couple months back I heard a very loud buzzing noise from behind my glovebox, the buzzing overpowered my sub.
This only happened when my car was ON, so I removed my glovebox and felt around for the noise to see if I could pinpoint it.
Originally I felt the vibrating on some AC cooling pipes near the passengers door, but then I found out it was a Servo Motor right next to the Radio.
I did some research all over the web trying to find out what it was and how to change it but found nothing. I went to my prefferred mechanic and he said it would cost $500 PLUS PARTS. SO i said fuck that :pissed: and went home and back online.
Eventually I found something close to it on a GS forum and just went with that. I go to a lexus parts website and went to the AC cooling and heating parts and found it was the COOLING SERVO that was going bad, you can confirm this by turning the heat all the way up and the noise will go away, and return when you bring it back to cool.
The part was $163 and the tools you need are

:ratcheting screwdriver phillips
:mini screwdriver phillips
:pocket knife phillips head screwdriver (for troublesome angles)

THe cooling servo is mounted behind 2 silver pipes running vertical. Caution they are hot.

Once you take off the glovebox, some gray air vents will be blocking your access, so just unclip those and take it off. Also as I recall I had to un plug a few things as well, the tricky screws are behind some cooling pipes


AND FIY, let your car sit overnight before doing this or you will most likely get first degree burns, I learned the hard way.

There are 4 screws I believe holding the servo in place and some are hidden, your definatley gonna need to get on your back a couple of times under the dashboard, like I said some of those screws are a bitch, you don't want a phillips head to small or too large.

This will save you at LEAST $500 so good luck and feel free to ask questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
When you try to do something DIY, it's better off to show some pictures then just words, but thanks anyway!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
crickey, he wanted to charge you 500.00 labor for this repair???? He must have been thinking he was going to pull the dash...or at least I hope thats what he thought. If not, i'd find a new mechanic. This took me about 45 minutes in my garage and that included dismantling/cleaning/lubing the old one and re-installing it!

edit: good work, and rep for the DIY!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I have the same issue

Curious of where you set the temp before removing the part... I am about to try and do this and I am wondering if the part comes in a default temp setting and if I should position mine prior to removal if this makes sense lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Curious of where you set the temp before removing the part... I am about to try and do this and I am wondering if the part comes in a default temp setting and if I should position mine prior to removal if this makes sense lol.
DONT move the servo arm. Youll break it (its what I did) The white arm inside the glove box that the motor arm connects to it spring loaded, so it will just fall down when you remove the old motor, but it's adjustable, so just match up the arm inside the glove box to the new motor you got.

I believe the computer just resets the new motor to the temp setting you have on the console.

Just remember that when the white arm in the glove box is all the way down, your temperature will be all the way down.

So if you want to play it safe, when the old motor is out, and the new one in, (make sure the peg on the motor arm is secure the the white glove box arm) just adjust the temperature as close as you can to the posistion.

Let me know if you have any more questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,821 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
DONT move the servo arm. Youll break it (its what I did) The white arm inside the glove box that the motor arm connects to it spring loaded, so it will just fall down when you remove the old motor, but it's adjustable, so just match up the arm inside the glove box to the new motor you got.

I believe the computer just resets the new motor to the temp setting you have on the console.

Just remember that when the white arm in the glove box is all the way down, your temperature will be all the way down.

So if you want to play it safe, when the old motor is out, and the new one in, (make sure the peg on the motor arm is secure the the white glove box arm) just adjust the temperature as close as you can to the posistion.

Let me know if you have any more questions.
I was referring to the other arm on the airbox side of vehicle. It actually just falls when module is disconnected. I just made sure the peg on the new motor was fit into the slot and once the car was started it moved fine. This is not a very difficult job but two fo those screws can be a mofo to reach because of the angles..

The job ended up costing me $130. So happy I no longer having that clicking noise and I don't have to have the temp on 60 or 85 degs :).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I wish that Denso sold just that servo motor inside of the module cause my gears were mint, it was just the motor was moving back and forth on its own.. Must be switching polarity inside when its not supposed to. I still might try to have the servo repaired so I have a spare. Might be able to get some money on Ebay considering the module is $165 list. That motor probably cost $10 to make lol.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
If you dont mind the effort that could work, you could jut get the tiny motor on any electronics website for around 10 bux.
I looked around but couldn't find any websites that sold them. Do you have any suggestions?? I googled the denso servo motor number that was actually on the motor itself. I would fix it and keep it as a spare or resell it cause the gears were perfect.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I looked around but couldn't find any websites that sold them. Do you have any suggestions?? I googled the denso servo motor number that was actually on the motor itself. I would fix it and keep it as a spare or resell it cause the gears were perfect.
Motors | AllElectronics.com

It may be on this website, match up any existing numbers on the motor you have.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
583 Posts
Not sure exactly which part (in particular) I need to replace:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Not sure exactly which part (in particular) I need to replace:
YouTube - Possible bad a/c servo
lol you were smart to actually post a video.

Pull out your glove box bro (very easy just push in side the pull toward you, then undo the two clips that hinge the glove box to the dash.

Ok turn your car on and youll hear the noise, when you do place your finger on each servo motor to see which one exactly is making the noise. There are only 2 on the left, and one next to the blower motor.

Turn your heat all the way up and see if it stops, if it does then its your cooling servo, if it doesn't it still could be it, but its definatley a servo bro.
Post another video if you need more help.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
I need to find the old part, I moved recently and don't know if I kept it lol. I hope I did cause this motor might be it. For $2.25 it might be worth a try. Thanks for the help!!

I am pretty sure I have it somewhere cause I know I have the servo motor still, and I know I wouldn't have kept it and thrown out the module. I am going to look for it tomorrow and take a picture of the servo motor either way.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top