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From TorqAmp
It's true the TorqAmp only delivers air, comparable to a turbocharger or supercharger
That's it, only air
So the ECU has to add the additional fuel via the injectors, fuel pump etc
We never placed larger injectors due to limited capacity And yes you have to map the ECU (injector opening time and ignition timing) and you will be good. For a normal tuner it's no rocket science, it's his daily job.We only added a voltage limitation between the intake pressure sensor and the ECU, a simple piece of electronics for less than 100 USD We asked some advice from a lexis tuning garage somewhere in this area and that simple piece of electronics is also used in combination with belt driven superchargers on the is200 The parasitic loses mentioned on the website are there in a different way The TorqAmp is equipped with an internal battery, this battery is slowly charged during cruising. When you press full throttle the charger switches off and compressor switches on, so during boosting no additional alternator load So it's more efficient then a belt driven supercharger Also turbochargers have parasitic losses because they increase the back pressure in the exhaust during boost and therefore there is power loss on the crankshaft This is not the case for electric superchargers such as the TorqAmp. So 4psi with electric supercharger will have slightly better performance then 4psi from a turbocharger or supercharger
So we don't know exactly how your ECU is programmed and if it is easy to change the mapping. In general it's easy is our experience
Do yourself a favour and take the TorqAmp FAQ information not with a grain of salt, but with the whole damn container (I read it all)...
I watched the same video (and for the record Cletus McFarland is a complete tool despite his popularity, you don't have to be smart to be popular, just popular) there is zero usable information in that video to form any kind of conclusive results.

For starters their so called base line reading... When an obstruction is placed in front of the intake (i.e like a non spinning supercharger) and you compare the figures to that of a turning supercharger you already know the results are a complete sham. That's like driving a car around a track and getting a lap time then doing it again with 3 wheels, it isn't even a remotely fair comparison, so the HP gains they show are completely meaningless. But putting their completely bogus results aside, and taking TorqAmps claims with much skepticism, is there merit to this idea?

Well I would say yes I have even been considering it myself for probably 30 years, BUT!!!!! don't think this is going to be anything like the claims. For starters you aren't going to get anything like the performance of even a cheap eBay turbocharger, and it is going to cost you infinitely more to set up.

So lets look at the things Cletus doesn't address because he, nor TorqAmp fully understand it...
Compressor surge: in the video the car went into severe compressor surge. If you are not familiar with compressor type boosting, compressor surge is when the air requirements, and the air delivered are completely out of whack. If you look at this page you will get a better idea of what surge is Surge in compressors - Wikipedia
Compressor surge can literally shatter the compressor wheel over time (fatigue), leaving your engine full of aluminum. While the TorqAmp is of questionable technology (compared to years and years of research by companies like Garrett) let's say the things holds together.

Now lets compare it to other compressor boost technologies... Not all superchargers are created equal. Companies like Paxton have been in the compressor supercharger game for nearly a century. They were offered on some factory cars back in the 50's. But in all of that time they have consistently maintained one aspect of their design, it was always a geared up direct drive system (which they improved around the 70's / 80's with ball bearing drive). Likewise you have numerous of those other supercharger names from yesteryear that joined them in similar designs, and more recently you have newly emerged big players like ProCharger which is essentially the same wheel reinvented, instead of using a belt system to drive it, they attach it directly to the crank.

Now, what do all of these superchargers have in common? They all have a fixed air to rev relationship (Paxton had a variable drive, but for example sake lets say they are fixed). So X amount of crank revolutions translates to roughly Y amount of air. Yes the compressor volume is logarithmic and increase with speed, but for the sake of a simple point the rev to air relationship is fixed. Therefore boost control is relatively simple.

Now lets look at the electric supercharger... The motor spins at a set RPM so it's output is fairly set. OK so you then say TorqAmp have a controller that can alter the speed of the motor. Yeah well my 3 speed pedestal fan has different speeds, but is it accurate enough to be able to deliver the right amount of boost at exactly the right time? I say not otherwise Cletus would not have had such severe surge.

Let's look at the conditions a typical supercharger needs to contend with. I might have high revs but minimal throttle (just closed the throttle after a pass down the drag strip). Imagine your electric motor is spinning it's little tail off and you suddenly close the throttle, hang on impeller we are out of here. Nothing in that system suggests that it has the smarts or technology to keep pace with an out of control boost monster. Did you look at the actual boost curves on the dyno that setup created? that is some serious cringe worth viewing.

Now lets for a moment say that you are an electronics genius, and a engine tuner worthy of being on a Formula 1 team, with intricate engine knowledge to get it running smoothly... There is still no free lunches to be had. The alternator has to put the charge into the battery pack to be able to use the supercharger. Extra load equates to poorer fuel economy while charging. And if you increase the alternator size to a bigger one then it become a permanent fuel burden. But let's say you don't care that it is going to cost extra fuel to charge up the battery pack... I have been investigating batteries for the last decade for my electric trike that I am building. Half of what is written about it's capability is garbage.

Some simple battery considerations. The faster the compressor wheel turns, the more energy that is required to turn it because of the increased load called boost (used or not), to the point that the motor becomes the limiting factor in how much boost in possible. When you hear the Street Outlaws guys talk about how many HP is required to turn the ProChargers that is HP to create boost. So likewise you need mucho grande HP to turn that compressor wheel to remotely make the same kind of boost figures that can be made with an off the shelf turbocharger.

But lets say you do up the motor to a much bigger unit. Then the next problem is supplying it with enough voltage. The TorqAmp uses a 48v system, so basically the 12v output of the alternator goes through a step up inverter. Following some very simple electrical laws stepping up the voltage 4 times means that you reduce the amps being supplied by a factor of 4, so you are now feeding it one fourth of the alternator extra capacity (what's left after the engines gobbles what it needs). So that means it is going to take some time to get the battery back up to full charge, that's not even factoring in losses like conversion from mechanical energy from the engine to the electrical energy output by the alternator, and then another loss as it is converted from 12v to 48v, then again at the supercharger motor.

But let's say we are happy to wait for it to come back up to charge, we then have to look at how much total power is available. As you hook up batteries in series to up the voltage, you decrease the Amp Hour (Ah) of the pack (for the same pack size). To give you a quick and dirty example. Let's say you have four car batteries that are 12v 200Ah, in series that gives you 48v 200Ah, but in parallel you would have 12v 800Ah. Now why does Ah matter? Well it is because of a little thing called C rating. All batteries have a C rating which is how much of that 200Ah can be pulled out of the battery before it explodes. Lets say the car batteries were rated at 1C that would mean that 200 amps could be drawn out of them for one hour (hence why it is called Amp Hour, not that they will last that long but that is the safe draw limit).

Car batteries are generally nothing like 1C. But let's once again looking at our two examples. In the 48v configuration we could only pull 200 amps, whereas the 12v configuration we could pull 800 amps. Now the reason they run 48v is many, firstly the higher the voltage the less voltage drop there is. Secondly the higher the voltage the thinner the wiring can be inside the motor, the higher the voltage the faster we can spin the motor. Essentially without going into too much detail more voltage is better.

Now lets look at the battery pack that comes with the TorqAmp. It is pitifully small because batteries especially lithium that will allow you to pull more than 1C are expensive. But they do allow you to pull more than 1C, some manufactures make ridiculous claims depending on the technology, but just remember the more power that is drawn the greater the chances of it going BANG!!!

So let's be conservative and say that they can draw 3C, that 3 times there nominal Ah rating. Only problem is you aren't going to have some massive Ah batteries like my example they are going to be really small like 10Ah. So if we can pull 10 amps at 48v some simple math tells us that is 480w (a x v = w), now remember our 3C rating allows us to ask 3 times its usual power so now it is capable of drawing ~1500w or 1.5kW. So that limits the size of the motor that can be used to power the supercharger.

Ignore the claims of what the motor is, it might be a 5kW motor (but that sounds a lot like 5 Chinese kWs) the limiting factor is what can be pulled out the batteries and for how long. If we are pulling 3C out of the batteries the pack will only last one third of the time.

So where is the good news in all this... Well there isn't a great deal of good news. electric superchargers can work, and some car manufactures are using them to supplement low boost on turbo cars and then shut off once the turbo reaches real boost, but in terms of anything other than a very expensive setup, with very questionable results, for traffic light to traffic light racing the idea of electric superchargers is basically a pipe dream not supported by the math or the science.
 

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lol I'm not saying he shouldn't do it. I'm just saying if he wants it to work properly it is going to take some seriously heavy duty research and be prepared for questionable results. I actually like the idea of it, but I would never do it in favour of a belt driven supercharger setup with an electric clutch that can be pulled in and out as required. Same idea only WAAAAYYYYYYY easier and safer.
 

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lol I'm not saying he shouldn't do it. I'm just saying if he wants it to work properly it is going to take some seriously heavy duty research and be prepared for questionable results. I actually like the idea of it, but I would never do it in favour of a belt driven supercharger setup with an electric clutch that can be pulled in and out as required. Same idea only WAAAAYYYYYYY easier and safer.
Ya, I basically eluded to a similar response, albeit not as detailed. I'm sure if you had a unit to use for testing you could really explain why something like this isn't practical.

He responded to me saying we gave him the insight he needed to make a decision on what to do, so if that means going for it or not, that's up to him
 

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lol I'm not saying he shouldn't do it. I'm just saying if he wants it to work properly it is going to take some seriously heavy duty research and be prepared for questionable results. I actually like the idea of it, but I would never do it in favour of a belt driven supercharger setup with an electric clutch that can be pulled in and out as required. Same idea only WAAAAYYYYYYY easier and safer.
This is some V8 MADMAX Falcon type $#!^ going on here. You rev it up to limiter, pull the lever, and shift up. ( I have no clue how it actually works )
 

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This is some V8 MADMAX Falcon type $#!^ going on here. You rev it up to limiter, pull the lever, and shift up. ( I have no clue how it actually works )
lol it didn't. I saw the original Mad Max car when it was doing the rounds at the show car scene way back in the day. The blower was completely gutted... there were no rotors in it (guessing the carby sat up in there). The front pulley turned courtesy of a washing machine motor. The blower was set up on about a blue 3/4" square tube frame. The picture of under the bonnet in the movie is not what was in the car during the famous pull up the button scenes.
 
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