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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody considered using the TorqAmp or any of these actual electric superchargers that are now available I saw an electric turbo thread like it was from 2006 so I figured I’d start a new one I’d really like to do this for my car especially because you can turn it on and off and keep basically the entire car stock remove it very easily and move it to a different car if you’d like there’s a YouTube video on Gen one IS-200 as well as some other cars. A Supra with a big single that they add the electric Turbo to to fever a better curve and spool faster. I really like the idea of being able to potentially do a set up where you could literally have the TorqAmp kick in whenever you wanted in the rpm range.
 

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Ok so I like keeping it stock this is a car I’m going to share and build and perhaps give to him.
So I’m not interested in any opinions on a traditional setup. I like keeping mostly stock. If I decide I can remove and put the electric turbo on something else. Sell the car stock.
 

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Cherisher
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What's the safe bone-stock boost range? 1-3psi? You need to upgrade the car to make it worth it.

The above comment isn't an opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What would the minimum you would need to do to handle 6psi
Injectors? Intake exhaust.
No hot air= no knock and no intercooler necessary.
 

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Ok so I like keeping it stock this is a car I’m going to share and build and perhaps give to him.
So I’m not interested in any opinions on a traditional setup. I like keeping mostly stock. If I decide I can remove and put the electric turbo on something else. Sell the car stock.
Apparently you have no experience on what is involved in boosting a car. It will take more fuel and timing adjustments to make it work properly. By the time you do just that. You still will find the more "traditional" still more better and more efficiently.

You can not just bolt on boost without other things. But have fun trying.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Ok do you can keep stock internals.
If I wanted to do this. Could someone please give me an idea of what I need to do instead of negative feedback.
If I wanted to keep my car as close to stock as possible.
I figured Engine management.That’s another cool feature of this idea. Some people call this a supercharger, but basically you can have it kick on at whatever RPM you want. In fact you might even be able to have different tunes for different scenarios.
 

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Cherisher
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The only negative feedback you're receiving is from your own perception.

Yes, you can keep stock rods and pistons for a little over 15psi but you can't call it stock and you don't want to push it very long.

The problem with what you want is turning it back to stock after adding boost and still calling it stock.
Boost is Boost no matter how you do it.

I recommend you check out the differences of the Go Fast and Go Faster forums on here.
There is a difference in a few HP gain vs. a few PSI gain.
 

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tl,dr: save your money

Electric super chargers have been around, nothing new there. The tech specs are lacking on this Torqamp. It states it makes 5.8 psi of pressure, but that’s only part of the equation. How much volume does it flow? In pounds per minute? It may choke a 2jz because it can’t flow enough. It could flow so much it leans it out and detonates it - doubtful but consider the possibility. It’s an interesting concept but not enough data to decide if it’s viable. Like everything in life, if it sounds to good to be true - it is.

I am no physicist but consider the laws of conservation of mass and energy - your engine is combusting fuel and air to turn an alternator via a belt to electrically power this electric fan that is moving air back in to the engine...that’s a lot of heat produced and parasitic loss from the various conversions of energy occurring here. With a turbo, it’s not free energy but it’s close because it’s driving the turbine via waste gas. Superchargers are driven parasitically via a belt but it’s still less energy conversion than this electric voodoo.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
There shouldn’t be any paracidic loss except for the additional weight of the turbo and battery.
 

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I imagine you found the idea from the popular youtuber Cleetus Mcfarland, as he just did a series on these with a 4cyl engine vehicle. There are a few things to consider when doing something like this to our engines. We have 50% more displacement than the one tested in his videos, so like the others have replied, you may run into volume and flow issues if not accounted for. Let alone getting less power for your dollar. If you think maybe netting 3lbs of boost for maybe an additional 30hp is worth the cost of the turbo alone, keep reading.

And in his video, you see that he has someone tune the engine to account for the added pressure. This is likely different than if you went with a traditional setup, using the stock ECU, like one of the members on the forum has done successfully operating under 6 PSI of boost.

Now you may consider the Torqamp does just about that, and you wouldn't hurt the weakest part of our engines, the rings. And you would be right, but I can't personally say if the stock ecu will be able to manage how the Torqamp delivers air into the engine. And if it could, which you would be experimenting with, I couldn't say how well that would be the case.

But lets assume you go full engine management, like below

I figured Engine management.That’s another cool feature of this idea. Some people call this a supercharger, but basically you can have it kick on at whatever RPM you want. In fact you might even be able to have different tunes for different scenarios.
And this is where additional engine management would come in. You figure if you don't want to fight the stock ECU, you would be best to go with a full standalone, which many people will tell you, isn't particularly cheap. If the turbo itself is $2,500 USD, and the engine management is on average $1,400 (using AEM's offering), not including a harness, which is an additional $600.

Add it all up, and you're approaching $5,000 when you throw in a professional tune. for a similar amount of money, you could have a realiable traditional setup, under the 6 PSI limit, that would not need the battery and controller, and so forth.

This doesn't even touch on the reliability of the electric turbo. There are many companies like Garret, or Precision turbos, that have so much R&D into making reliable pieces of equipment.

It simply begs the $5,000 question, if you go into this as a guinea pig, is it worth maybe finding all the problems we've mentioned in this post, for a potentially unreliable and expensive modification?

Your money bro, go for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I did watch the Cletus MacFarlane video but I’ve watched most every video they made and I was especially interested in the 911 SC that would have either a 3.0 or 32 flat six the results on that car were pretty awesome anyway I think you answered my questions and I certainly appreciate it.
 

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There shouldn’t be any paracidic loss except for the additional weight of the turbo and battery.
You will lose energy converting from internal combustion to mechanical crank driven belt to alternator to battery to electric turbo fan. Each stage here is not 100% efficient and will create heat + less energy than what you put in.

I did miss the flow charts, thanks for posting them. To compare, my BW s362sxe (not a small turbo but definitely not a huge one, either) flows max 78 lbs/min. Magnitudes greater than this electric fan. You are going to choke your 2jz. I can’t see how it’s capable of spinning fast enough to build boost (>120000 rpm) on dry bearings, either.
 

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:D I must be getting old, this is like listening to my kids quote me a youtube clip or something they googled and them taking it as proven gospel and not someones opinion or trick. Its tried and proven by the masses, or not, for a reason. Otherwise wouldnt the scrooges at the auto manufacturers have jumped all over it as a cheaper way to make more power for less money?!

Not mentioned is how much testing trial and error, and most importantly risk, our friendly SA guy (pheonx?? sorry cant remember his name) did to get his car running on a known air flow turbo with stock fuel management. However he was investing a lot of money changing fuel pumps and regulators, injectors, running wideband sensors and gauges to try and get close to stoic without melting the weaker rings and pistons in the stock 2JGE engine, or getting detonation. And he still had a few issues, which if i remember rightly ended up leading to a more traditional build in the end. So in the end it can be done, but there is a load of extras involved to make it run right and not melt or detonate the internals (which is easy to do), it was a very fine line as to the effect of any other changes and for me thats a hell of a risk. If it goes tits up whats your fall back? Bin the car or fork out for a new motor? Either way by economic stand point you are then starting to cost similar to a low boost setup.

Lol, now i'm sounding old . . . :rolleyes: :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
From TorqAmp
It's true the TorqAmp only delivers air, comparable to a turbocharger or supercharger
That's it, only air
So the ECU has to add the additional fuel via the injectors, fuel pump etc
We never placed larger injectors due to limited capacity And yes you have to map the ECU (injector opening time and ignition timing) and you will be good. For a normal tuner it's no rocket science, it's his daily job.We only added a voltage limitation between the intake pressure sensor and the ECU, a simple piece of electronics for less than 100 USD We asked some advice from a lexis tuning garage somewhere in this area and that simple piece of electronics is also used in combination with belt driven superchargers on the is200 The parasitic loses mentioned on the website are there in a different way The TorqAmp is equipped with an internal battery, this battery is slowly charged during cruising. When you press full throttle the charger switches off and compressor switches on, so during boosting no additional alternator load So it's more efficient then a belt driven supercharger Also turbochargers have parasitic losses because they increase the back pressure in the exhaust during boost and therefore there is power loss on the crankshaft This is not the case for electric superchargers such as the TorqAmp. So 4psi with electric supercharger will have slightly better performance then 4psi from a turbocharger or supercharger
So we don't know exactly how your ECU is programmed and if it is easy to change the mapping. In general it's easy is our experience
 

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JJJohnson Even if you overlook the tuning and fuel etc. You will find the electric deal can not maintain full load for very long. Do to the electrical demand. So then you would need more amps from the alternator. Then getting more heat and wear. Unless you are going custom dual or triple mount alternators. Or even more batteries or capacitors.

But have fun if you want to devote your time and money.
 
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