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News on Nort Korea :




SEOUL, South Korea (Dec. 12) - Raising fears of a nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula, North Korea said Thursday it will immediately reactivate a nuclear power plant that U.S. officials suspect was being used to develop weapons.

A North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman said his country would revive the old, Soviet-designed nuclear reactor and resume construction of other nuclear facilities to supply desperately needed power. KCNA, the North's state-run news agency, quoted the spokesman but did not name him.

The nuclear program was suspended under a 1994 deal with Washington, averting a possible war on the Korean Peninsula. Experts say North Korea could quickly extract enough plutonium from its old facilities to make several nuclear weapons.

The official said North Korea was obliged to revive the program because of the U.S.-led decision last month to suspend annual oil shipments of 500,000 tons to the North. The suspension of the shipments - a key provision of the 1994 deal - was designed to pressure North Korea to give up a more recent nuclear program based on uranium enrichment.

The United States says the uranium-based program violated a nuclear arms control clause in the 1994 pact.

''The prevailing situation compelled the (North Korean) government to lift its measure for nuclear freeze ... and immediately resume the operation and construction of its nuclear facilities to generate electricity,'' the spokesman was quoted as saying in comments that were monitored by South Korea's Yonhap news agency.

''Our country faced an immediate problem in electricity generation because the United States has virtually abandoned its obligations,'' the spokesman said.

''Our principled stand is that the nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula should be resolved peacefully,'' the spokesman said. ''It's totally up to the United States whether we will freeze our nuclear facilities again.''

Although the spokesman left open the possibility of dialogue to solve the standoff, the prospect that North Korea might reactivate its plutonium-based nuclear program had long been feared by U.S. and South Korean officials.

South Korean President Kim Dae-jung, who has sought to reconcile with North Korea, received a briefing from his national security advisers.

U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said he believes North Korea already has one or two nuclear weapons. The communist country is also a major vendor of missiles and missile technology.

The North Korean announcement followed the seizure and release this week of a ship carrying North Korean Scud missiles to Yemen. North Korea's missile customers have also included Libya, Iran, Syria, Pakistan and Egypt.

''We can only speculate that yesterday's incident and North Korea's electricity shortage in the winter propelled North Korea to make a response,'' said Kim Sung-han of the state-run Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security in Seoul.

U.S. officials say North Korea told them in October that it had a secret program to enrich uranium to make nuclear weapons. The Bush administration has vowed to try to solve the problem through diplomacy.

Under the 1994 pact, North Korea agreed to freeze the plutonium program in return for two modern, light-water reactors built by a U.S.-led consortium. North Korea often complained about delays in construction of the reactors, which are several years behind schedule.

North Korea had a 5-megawatt plutonium reactor at Yongbyon and two bigger reactors, with capacities of 50 megawatts and 200 megawatts respectively, under construction when it signed the 1994 agreement with the United States.

About 8,000 plutonium fuel rods were separated from the frozen 5-megawatt reactor and sealed in protective metal cases for permanent disposal under the supervision of the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA.

Experts say North Korean scientists could quickly reprocess the spent fuel rods into weapons-grade plutonium. IAEA inspectors are currently monitoring the rods.

At the height of the confrontation over North Korea's plutonium-based program in 1994, a North Korean negotiator threatened to turn Seoul into ''a sea of fire.'' Fearing war, residents of the South rushed to stores to stock up on food and other supplies.

AP-NY-12-12-02 0801EST

Copyright 2002 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.
 

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stcleaner said:
News on Nort Korea :




SEOUL, South Korea (Dec. 12) - Raising fears of a nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula, North Korea said Thursday it will immediately reactivate a nuclear power plant that U.S. officials suspect was being used to develop weapons.

A North Korean Foreign Ministry spokesman said his country would revive the old, Soviet-designed nuclear reactor and resume construction of other nuclear facilities to supply desperately needed power. KCNA, the North's state-run news agency, quoted the spokesman but did not name him.

The nuclear program was suspended under a 1994 deal with Washington, averting a possible war on the Korean Peninsula. Experts say North Korea could quickly extract enough plutonium from its old facilities to make several nuclear weapons.

The official said North Korea was obliged to revive the program because of the U.S.-led decision last month to suspend annual oil shipments of 500,000 tons to the North. The suspension of the shipments - a key provision of the 1994 deal - was designed to pressure North Korea to give up a more recent nuclear program based on uranium enrichment.

The United States says the uranium-based program violated a nuclear arms control clause in the 1994 pact.

''The prevailing situation compelled the (North Korean) government to lift its measure for nuclear freeze ... and immediately resume the operation and construction of its nuclear facilities to generate electricity,'' the spokesman was quoted as saying in comments that were monitored by South Korea's Yonhap news agency.

''Our country faced an immediate problem in electricity generation because the United States has virtually abandoned its obligations,'' the spokesman said.

''Our principled stand is that the nuclear crisis on the Korean Peninsula should be resolved peacefully,'' the spokesman said. ''It's totally up to the United States whether we will freeze our nuclear facilities again.''

Although the spokesman left open the possibility of dialogue to solve the standoff, the prospect that North Korea might reactivate its plutonium-based nuclear program had long been feared by U.S. and South Korean officials.

South Korean President Kim Dae-jung, who has sought to reconcile with North Korea, received a briefing from his national security advisers.

U.S. Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld has said he believes North Korea already has one or two nuclear weapons. The communist country is also a major vendor of missiles and missile technology.

The North Korean announcement followed the seizure and release this week of a ship carrying North Korean Scud missiles to Yemen. North Korea's missile customers have also included Libya, Iran, Syria, Pakistan and Egypt.

''We can only speculate that yesterday's incident and North Korea's electricity shortage in the winter propelled North Korea to make a response,'' said Kim Sung-han of the state-run Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security in Seoul.

U.S. officials say North Korea told them in October that it had a secret program to enrich uranium to make nuclear weapons. The Bush administration has vowed to try to solve the problem through diplomacy.

Under the 1994 pact, North Korea agreed to freeze the plutonium program in return for two modern, light-water reactors built by a U.S.-led consortium. North Korea often complained about delays in construction of the reactors, which are several years behind schedule.

North Korea had a 5-megawatt plutonium reactor at Yongbyon and two bigger reactors, with capacities of 50 megawatts and 200 megawatts respectively, under construction when it signed the 1994 agreement with the United States.

About 8,000 plutonium fuel rods were separated from the frozen 5-megawatt reactor and sealed in protective metal cases for permanent disposal under the supervision of the Vienna-based International Atomic Energy Agency, or IAEA.

Experts say North Korean scientists could quickly reprocess the spent fuel rods into weapons-grade plutonium. IAEA inspectors are currently monitoring the rods.

At the height of the confrontation over North Korea's plutonium-based program in 1994, a North Korean negotiator threatened to turn Seoul into ''a sea of fire.'' Fearing war, residents of the South rushed to stores to stock up on food and other supplies.

AP-NY-12-12-02 0801EST

Copyright 2002 The Associated Press. The information contained in the AP news report may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or otherwise distributed without the prior written authority of The Associated Press. All active hyperlinks have been inserted by AOL.


Don't worry everyone!!! :lol:

North Korea is just a f*cked-up country that cannot even feed their own people, let alone, their own troops!

North Korea just wants attention from the United States and Western Europe. North Korea always talks Bullsh*t before South Korean Presidential elections (which will be in a week).

So guys, just move on with your life,...enjoy your cars,...your girls,....and your daily activities! :) No need to worry!!! :chill:
 

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MY IS300 said:
stcleaner said:
News on Nort Korea :Don't worry everyone!!! :lol:

North Korea is just a f*cked-up country that cannot even feed their own people, let alone, their own troops!
They can't feed their people, so guess who does? The US. South Korea (WTF?!). Japan.

It astounds me that many South Koreans prefer to embrace North Korea as their "fraternal Korean brethren" in favor of the United States. North Korea announces a nuclear weapons program, and most Koreans I know could care less. 2 US soldiers run over 2 Korean schoolgirls, and I hear "US SOLDIERS LEAVE NOW!" all over the place.

If it weren't for the US of A, South Korea would be kneeling before the effigies of the Great Leader and Dear Leader in adoring worship (though one could argue that it was the US and USSR screwing up that created North Korea in the first place).
 

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stealth said:
MY IS300 said:
stcleaner said:
News on Nort Korea :Don't worry everyone!!! :lol:

North Korea is just a f*cked-up country that cannot even feed their own people, let alone, their own troops!
They can't feed their people, so guess who does? The US. South Korea (WTF?!). Japan.

It astounds me that many South Koreans prefer to embrace North Korea as their "fraternal Korean brethren" in favor of the United States. North Korea announces a nuclear weapons program, and most Koreans I know could care less. 2 US soldiers run over 2 Korean schoolgirls, and I hear "US SOLDIERS LEAVE NOW!" all over the place.

If it weren't for the US of A, South Korea would be kneeling before the effigies of the Great Leader and Dear Leader in adoring worship (though one could argue that it was the US and USSR screwing up that created North Korea in the first place).

Hello stealth :lol:

I agree with your interesting comments. :)
Although I am Korean, I disagree with a lot of their actions and comments.

The US troops ran over two middle school girls. But it was an accident. Everyday 1,500 Koreans die in a transportation-related accident. Some of them were hit by police cars by accident. But do I hear any chants of "POLICE NEED TO APOLOGIZE OR LEAVE"? No!

Please understand that all this Anti-U.S. is a "SMALL" portion of us Koreans. Many Koreans like myself respect the Americans very much and I have great respect for Americans......except for my f*ckin Infiniti Dealer. :lol:

Enjoy your day! :chill:
 

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I'm korean too.

For me though, nearly every Korean(-American) person I know personally (family, friends, etc.) seem to think North Korea is good at heart, USA is evil. Maybe the way Korean-Americans think differs from how Koreans think.

I just had an AIM chat with a friend (who is 1.5 generation Korean-American) regarding North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs. His opinion?

Regarding missiles being sent to Pakistan, Iraq, etc: "It's just international trade."

Regarding nuclear weapons: "The US has them. Why can't North Korea?"

My former boss (1st generation Korean-American) actually *wants* North Korea to develop weapons of mass destruction so that when and if North and South unify, the unified Korea can use them as collateral against possible US, Japanese, and Chinese agressive policies - military and economic.
 

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MY IS300 said:
stealth said:
MY IS300 said:
stcleaner said:
News on Nort Korea :Don't worry everyone!!! :lol:

North Korea is just a f*cked-up country that cannot even feed their own people, let alone, their own troops!
They can't feed their people, so guess who does? The US. South Korea (WTF?!). Japan.

It astounds me that many South Koreans prefer to embrace North Korea as their "fraternal Korean brethren" in favor of the United States. North Korea announces a nuclear weapons program, and most Koreans I know could care less. 2 US soldiers run over 2 Korean schoolgirls, and I hear "US SOLDIERS LEAVE NOW!" all over the place.

If it weren't for the US of A, South Korea would be kneeling before the effigies of the Great Leader and Dear Leader in adoring worship (though one could argue that it was the US and USSR screwing up that created North Korea in the first place).
Many Koreans like myself respect the Americans very much and I have great respect for Americans......except for my f*ckin Infiniti Dealer. :lol:

Enjoy your day! :chill:
BWAHAHAHA! :lol:
 

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stealth said:
I'm korean too.

For me though, nearly every Korean(-American) person I know personally (family, friends, etc.) seem to think North Korea is good at heart, USA is evil. Maybe the way Korean-Americans think differs from how Koreans think.

I just had an AIM chat with a friend (who is 1.5 generation Korean-American) regarding North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs. His opinion?

Regarding missiles being sent to Pakistan, Iraq, etc: "It's just international trade."

Regarding nuclear weapons: "The US has them. Why can't North Korea?"

My former boss (1st generation Korean-American) actually *wants* North Korea to develop weapons of mass destruction so that when and if North and South unify, the unified Korea can use them as collateral against possible US, Japanese, and Chinese agressive policies - military and economic.
Steath, I am out of the loop. Why if Korea unified would the U.S. create agressive policies against them?
 

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HoustonGGP said:
stealth said:
I'm korean too.

For me though, nearly every Korean(-American) person I know personally (family, friends, etc.) seem to think North Korea is good at heart, USA is evil. Maybe the way Korean-Americans think differs from how Koreans think.

I just had an AIM chat with a friend (who is 1.5 generation Korean-American) regarding North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs. His opinion?

Regarding missiles being sent to Pakistan, Iraq, etc: "It's just international trade."

Regarding nuclear weapons: "The US has them. Why can't North Korea?"

My former boss (1st generation Korean-American) actually *wants* North Korea to develop weapons of mass destruction so that when and if North and South unify, the unified Korea can use them as collateral against possible US, Japanese, and Chinese agressive policies - military and economic.
Steath, I am out of the loop. Why if Korea unified would the U.S. create agressive policies against them?
I'm just repeating what my former boss apparently wants to see happen.

He said something along the lines of "If the US (or China, Japan, etc.) demands that American imports into Korea be sold at a lower price, or else Korean imports into America must be sold at a higher price, then (unified) Korea can use their nuclear trump card so that any negotiations will occur on a more level playing field"

Again, I don't agree with the above, but I'm saying there are Koreans who do.
 

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stealth said:
HoustonGGP said:
stealth said:
I'm korean too.

For me though, nearly every Korean(-American) person I know personally (family, friends, etc.) seem to think North Korea is good at heart, USA is evil. Maybe the way Korean-Americans think differs from how Koreans think.

I just had an AIM chat with a friend (who is 1.5 generation Korean-American) regarding North Korea's nuclear and ballistic missile programs. His opinion?

Regarding missiles being sent to Pakistan, Iraq, etc: "It's just international trade."

Regarding nuclear weapons: "The US has them. Why can't North Korea?"

My former boss (1st generation Korean-American) actually *wants* North Korea to develop weapons of mass destruction so that when and if North and South unify, the unified Korea can use them as collateral against possible US, Japanese, and Chinese agressive policies - military and economic.
Steath, I am out of the loop. Why if Korea unified would the U.S. create agressive policies against them?
I'm just repeating what my former boss apparently wants to see happen.

He said something along the lines of "If the US (or China, Japan, etc.) demands that American imports into Korea be sold at a lower price, or else Korean imports into America must be sold at a higher price, then (unified) Korea can use their nuclear trump card so that any negotiations will occur on a more level playing field"

Again, I don't agree with the above, but I'm saying there are Koreans who do.
that seems insane....so if we say, "hey sell our chevy's cheaper or we wont accept anymore KIA's" they are gonna bust out the nuke card?

MYIS300 you better start workin on that virginity thing in a hurry.
 

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HoustonGGP said:
that seems insane....so if we say, "hey sell our chevy's cheaper or we wont accept anymore KIA's" they are gonna bust out the nuke card?

MYIS300 you better start workin on that virginity thing in a hurry.
That's actually pretty close to the example he gave me =P, though he used Hyundais and Fords.

Koreans like expensive (relatively speaking) foreign cars.
So Koreans want to buy Fords instead of Hyundais.
But Fords are expensive in Korea.
So many Koreans can't buy Fords even if they wanted to.
So this is bad for Ford.

Thus, the US says to Korea "let Ford sell their cars cheaper in Korea, or else we will force Hyundai to sell their cars at a higher price in America"
So Korea must accept America's terms.

But in the future, in a unified Korea armed with the former North Korea's nuclear weapons, Korea can say to America "screw you".

Do note that my boss's case is probably an extreme one. I doubt most Koreans think like him.
 

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stealth said:
HoustonGGP said:
that seems insane....so if we say, "hey sell our chevy's cheaper or we wont accept anymore KIA's" they are gonna bust out the nuke card?

MYIS300 you better start workin on that virginity thing in a hurry.
That's actually pretty close to the example he gave me =P, though he used Hyundais and Fords.

Koreans like expensive (relatively speaking) foreign cars.
So Koreans want to buy Fords instead of Hyundais.
But Fords are expensive in Korea.
So many Koreans can't buy Fords even if they wanted to.
So this is bad for Ford.

Thus, the US says to Korea "let Ford sell their cars cheaper in Korea, or else we will force Hyundai to sell their cars at a higher price in America"
So Korea must accept America's terms.

But in the future, in a unified Korea armed with the former North Korea's nuclear weapons, Korea can say to America "screw you".

Do note that my boss's case is probably an extreme one. I doubt most Koreans think like him.
speechless. are you and your boss here in america?
 

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Of course. I believe he is a naturalized US citizen to boot o_O;

Which is why I mentioned above - I'm wondering if Koreans in Korea who have to live with the threat of the North Korean Army pouring over the DMZ differ in opinions with Korean-Americans who are detached from that situation.
 
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