Lexus IS Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
OK, i've searched the forums & have only found a few kits for the IS300.
i currently dont own one(until this summer comes around)i currently own a turbo-honda, that ive blown up & rebuilt it motor twice, & want something solid.
so far ,kits that are made are: TBKO, PHR, Toyomoto, & a few others i dont remember. these are by far really spendy. so im thinking about peicing one together. So id need your input on theses things

a manifold-everywhere i look there arent any pics of the manifolds. fitment/clearance issues, any warranties on cracking w/ it being cast or not.
fuel management. what are u guys using? Motec, AEM, Haltec?
what are the weak pointsin the 5spd drive train?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,157 Posts
if you have blown up the civic, you will most likely blow up the IS. although the IS has rods that handle power, and do not bend under any type of boost, the ecu and over all everything is much more complex.

it is not a do-it-yourselfers car by any means, especially since it is so new. there are a few tuners that are offering stand alones, and some that offer piggy back, as i am sure you have found through your research. it has a smaller engine bay, than the other toyotas, hence the clearance problems.

$6 grand for a turbo kit is a piss in the bucket, i know you are used to honda prices and honda mass production (comparatively) but that isn't going to happen with the IS. there are probably 500000 civics on the streets (probably a conservative number). there is about 50000 IS300's.

the reason there isn't pics of manifolds, is because none of the tuners want there stuff being copied, so its under wraps. the 5 speed trans should hold 400rwhp, the clutch won't hold more than ~325rwhp under spirited driving or drag racing, but of course, a better clutch can be installed to cure this. all of the high hp IS300's that are manual, use the six speed transmission from the supra so far.

-gte






turbohatch said:
OK, i've searched the forums & have only found a few kits for the IS300.
i currently dont own one(until this summer comes around)i currently own a turbo-honda, that ive blown up & rebuilt it motor twice, & want something solid.
so far ,kits that are made are: TBKO, PHR, Toyomoto, & a few others i dont remember. these are by far really spendy. so im thinking about peicing one together. So id need your input on theses things

a manifold-everywhere i look there arent any pics of the manifolds. fitment/clearance issues, any warranties on cracking w/ it being cast or not.
fuel management. what are u guys using? Motec, AEM, Haltec?
what are the weak pointsin the 5spd drive train?

just for kicks, my civic, is IS300 blue

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
the first time i blew my civic, it was melted ring lands, the second was w/ eagle rods, ross racing pistons, the sleeves decided to go.
id just like to see the design of the manifold so i know which one to get(ifthey would sell it seperately) As far as peicing it together, Im not a newb to FI.i can do the fuel setup & adapt a standalone to work, all other thing by myself.
any other weakpoints/obsticales that i should know about???

thanks,
mong
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,157 Posts
toyomoto just started selling their manifold seperately through another retailer, other than that, i don't know of anyone that will.

as for things that you should know about ahead of time, heed my advice about the IS being much harder than the civic. learn the term multiplex, after it kicks your ass 8 ways from sunday, you'll hate it. if you think you can beat it, it will work harder to beat you down, it has a mind of its own, almost AI :) . also take this into consideration, the car is 2.5 years old, there is only a few f/i kits out, and no do-it-yourself kits, there is a reason for this, let me know if you have thoughts as to why.

its an iron block, no need for sleeves, it can have melted pistons if the tuner makes a mistake, the pistons and rods do not need to be replaced if power is at or under around 500rwhp. above 8 pounds of boost, compression will have to be lowered on a street vehicle, this can be done via a spacer headgasket.

heed my multiplex advice!

-gte






turbohatch said:
the first time i blew my civic, it was melted ring lands, the second was w/ eagle rods, ross racing pistons, the sleeves decided to go.
id just like to see the design of the manifold so i know which one to get(ifthey would sell it seperately) As far as peicing it together, Im not a newb to FI.i can do the fuel setup & adapt a standalone to work, all other thing by myself.
any other weakpoints/obsticales that i should know about???

thanks,
mong
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
IS300GTE said:
toyomoto just started selling their manifold seperately through another retailer, other than that, i don't know of anyone that will.

as for things that you should know about ahead of time, heed my advice about the IS being much harder than the civic. learn the term multiplex, after it kicks your ass 8 ways from sunday, you'll hate it. if you think you can beat it, it will work harder to beat you down, it has a mind of its own, almost AI :) . also take this into consideration, the car is 2.5 years old, there is only a few f/i kits out, and no do-it-yourself kits, there is a reason for this, let me know if you have thoughts as to why.

its an iron block, no need for sleeves, it can have melted pistons if the tuner makes a mistake, the pistons and rods do not need to be replaced if power is at or under around 500rwhp. above 8 pounds of boost, compression will have to be lowered on a street vehicle, this can be done via a spacer headgasket.

heed my multiplex advice!

-gte






turbohatch said:
the first time i blew my civic, it was melted ring lands, the second was w/ eagle rods, ross racing pistons, the sleeves decided to go.
id just like to see the design of the manifold so i know which one to get(ifthey would sell it seperately) As far as peicing it together, Im not a newb to FI.i can do the fuel setup & adapt a standalone to work, all other thing by myself.
any other weakpoints/obsticales that i should know about???

thanks,
mong
Ehh, not to be the voice of contradiction, but high compression turbo is quite possible with good ignition tuning. Especially on the 2JZ. However there is a lot less room for error. Detonation will kill pistons, rods, and head gaskets like never before. But I guess that's really a matter of opinion. Let me say that high compression turbo charging is a lot more fun, and a lot better performance. But in the end it can be a nightmare if you don't do it right.

And just for clarification, comparing the 2JZ to any Honda engine doesn't work. 2JZ was made as a performance engine, Honda's are made for mass production. Sleeve's were first pioneered by VW on the bug as an alternative to having to hone cylinder walls. You could simple replace your cylinder walls. It also made using an aluminum block a lot easier. Basically, it was a cheap way of getting out of it.

Listen to IS300GTE, he's dead on the money. In this world "You have to pay to play" and trying to do it yourself will not be easy, nor will it be cheap. In the long run you'll find a lot less money invested if you let a professional do it. The fact is you don't have the resources to make all the custom work that will need to be done, and buying the parts alone will be about the same as having a shop tune it. It's not like Honda where you have a million ways to do things.

Remember that breaking parts on this car will add up quickly. Simple parts are not easy to come by, and dealership will take your wallet on everything. Take a look at how much a set of pistons will run should you "have an accident"

Best of luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Im not comparing a Honda to Lexus here. Its more of NA to NA-T comparison. Where honda is the mother of all NA-T(disagreements?)
Please explain what can be so complex to doing it yourself? If you look at most NA-T turbo kits(for any make/model), you see that in all the kits, there are the same parts that you get;
manifold-bought
turbo- bought
downpipe-custom
intercooler- bought
IC piping- custom
some type of boost dependant fuel management(piggy back, standalone or rising rate fpr)
fuel system upgrades(injectors, pump, lines)
oil feed & drain lines

If you look at it, there isnt really much "custom" work to be done but the downpipe & intercooler piping. But that would still be peicing it together/do it yourself, right??? The only hard part that I can see is adapting a standalone to work for the IS300. Everything else is self explanitory.
For the fact that im in Minnesota, an inhouse install is out of question & too much money.

Am I missing anything here. please explain in detail what problems will be incountered.

-mong
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,157 Posts
you are from the outside looking in, if it was that simple, everyone with a mig welder would do it themselves
once you encounter fuel system problems, and then most of all, stand alone problems, you'll see exactly what people are talking about.

i guess you could hack the car all to hell, and not have anything else in the car work, including abs, the speedo, or just about anything, and maybe make the stand alone install easier, but you might as well keep the honda at that point, since you are eliminating all the things that make the lexus a lexus.

the reason honda was the start of all of the n/a to turbo conversions, is because its easy. honda is speed density from the factory, its 4 cylinders, and has a return fuel system. if you put a rising rate regulator and the turbo on the car, most people are happy with the 8 pounds of boost that it can handle.

the IS is completely different, especially in the ecu area. you'll find out though once you get into the project.

btw, are you saying you already have all of those parts for the car you don't own yet?

-gte


ps - as for the compression vs boost discussion, i was referring to boost on pump gas, and why only so much boost can be ran on the IS's stock motor on pump gas. retarding the ignition timing, and adding 2 pounds didn't do hardly anything, maybe added 10hp, but increased cylinder pressure and temperature alot more, wasn't worth it





turbohatch said:
Im not comparing a Honda to Lexus here. Its more of NA to NA-T comparison. Where honda is the mother of all NA-T(disagreements?)
Please explain what can be so complex to doing it yourself? If you look at most NA-T turbo kits(for any make/model), you see that in all the kits, there are the same parts that you get;
manifold-bought
turbo- bought
downpipe-custom
intercooler- bought
IC piping- custom
some type of boost dependant fuel management(piggy back, standalone or rising rate fpr)
fuel system upgrades(injectors, pump, lines)
oil feed & drain lines

If you look at it, there isnt really much "custom" work to be done but the downpipe & intercooler piping. But that would still be peicing it together/do it yourself, right??? The only hard part that I can see is adapting a standalone to work for the IS300. Everything else is self explanitory.
For the fact that im in Minnesota, an inhouse install is out of question & too much money.

Am I missing anything here. please explain in detail what problems will be incountered.

-mong
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Dean Marcum, 9.87:1 compression, 14 psi. <shrug> Ignition timing can do a lot. Oh, and I've witnessed that car first hand, that is most impressive. Most people still don't believe he does what he says he's done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
forget about getting the is300 and get one of these


1983 2 door Datsun Sentra with a custom body kit and spoiler made of wood. J It started out with the spoiler and then I just had to make the rest. This car gets more attention than any Ferrari and is pretty famous!!
The car itself is a 1.5L 4 cylinder with a 5-speed manual transmission and has 256K original miles on it. It is quicker than you would think and it has enough power to spin the tires on dry pavement. I know a lot of other little sedans driving around that can't do that. My grandparents bought the car brand new in ’83 and it has been in the family ever since. They took excellent care of it and it should have no problem reaching 300K miles.!!!

Wow thats a buy!!!

Here is a link to the action!!
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1874867868
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,157 Posts
although it may allow him to run 14 pounds, static cylinder pressure is not going to change. how much power did he make between 12 and 14 pounds?
also, why is his 7mge 9.87:1 when stock GE's are 9.2:1 ? did he mill the head and cc the chambers afterwards? is the stock piston design scrapped, and a higher CR design implemented?

-gte






John Carnes said:
Dean Marcum, 9.87:1 compression, 14 psi. <shrug> Ignition timing can do a lot. Oh, and I've witnessed that car first hand, that is most impressive. Most people still don't believe he does what he says he's done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
161 Posts
Stock Cressida pistons.

And I'm not sure of the 12 - 14 psi difference, however there is still a rise in the effective compression.

IS300GTE said:
although it may allow him to run 14 pounds, static cylinder pressure is not going to change. how much power did he make between 12 and 14 pounds?
also, why is his 7mge 9.87:1 when stock GE's are 9.2:1 ? did he mill the head and cc the chambers afterwards? is the stock piston design scrapped, and a higher CR design implemented?

-gte






John Carnes said:
Dean Marcum, 9.87:1 compression, 14 psi. <shrug> Ignition timing can do a lot. Oh, and I've witnessed that car first hand, that is most impressive. Most people still don't believe he does what he says he's done.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
About this Discussion
15 Replies
7 Participants
John Carnes
Lexus IS Forum
Community dedicated to Lexus IS Enthusiasts. Come in and enjoy our articles, galleries and information on aftermarket parts for the IS300, IS250, IS350.
Full Forum Listing
Top