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My dealer has been telling me that Lexus (globally) has changed the recommended engine oil type for the IS family of vehicles (specifically the 2006 IS 250 AWD) from 5w30 to 5w20.

I did a bit of investigating and contacted Lexus directly, their response was:

"I apologize that you have received conflicting information regarding the type of oil recommended for your 2006 IS 250. According to our records the recommended type of oil is 5W30. 5W30 is an oil that provides optimal levels of fuel efficiency,however, the viscosity of the oil may be changed if the vehicle is operated at high speeds. "

Have any of you heard of this new standard 5w20 for the IS250?
 

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Hmmm, I just got my maintance a while back at a Lexus dealer. They still used 5w30 oil for my car. I think you should stick with it, it might just be a rumor feel me..
 

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I use 10w30 in my IS300 all the time instead of the 5w30..

... but then again I am in a warmer climate, so not a big deal for me.

Joe Z
:)
 

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I think it's important to have the w30 part in hot weather.
Hmm - I thought the cooler climates needed the 5w part for the cold starts??? :lol:
 

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the switch to 5w-20 weight is because of fuel economy. I used to 10W-30 mobil 1 for two years before I switched back to 5w-30. I would stick with the 30 weight for engine protection.
 

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the switch to 5w-20 weight is because of fuel economy. I used to 10W-30 mobil 1 for two years before I switched back to 5w-30. I would stick with the 30 weight for engine protection.
Good point. I just did my own oil change & used 5w-20. I think I'll switch back to 5w-30 next time around.

-Mike
 

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Just to clarify some confusion here, the rating goes to winter rating then high performance rating. The number before the "W" is for a temperature until which the oil will provide lubrication. The number to look out for is -40 Celsius (whichhappens to equal -40 Fahrenheit.) A 0W30 oil is 'good to go' until -40C; a 5W30 oil is until -35C, a 10W30 is good until-20C, and so on. The second number is the 'high temperature rating' which is (to simplify) until how 'high' the oil will provide proper lubrication in high temperature (not outside, but inside the engine when you're revving high, going fast, etc..) SO I live in warm California, I don't care about winter rating at all, but I drive like a (madman) -ehm, normal local, so I REALLY focus on the second number. My motorcycles use 10W40 or 10W50, since they rev high, etc... "back in the day" there was different oils for the winter and the summer, but now the 'all season' oils make life MUCH better for basically everyone in the world. If you really wanna get the best for your engine, you should be up to date which is the latest standard is, since it's not really the brands that matter but the different testing standards and certificates. If anyone puts a XXw20 oil in their car instead of the originally recommendedXXw30, I'd really consider 2 things: Engineers REALLY KNOW what's good for your engine; YOU should really consider if you drive like a normal person, or a grandma, or like a madman.. I see a logic by using a XXw20 could reduce fuel consumption, but you'd never be able to sell me a quart, because of 2 things: I know how I drive, and XXw30 was originally recommended; AND gas is cheaper than engine wear. Please for the love of God, don't say or listen to light/heavy/thin or any of these words. Most people only use this because they can't comprehend what viscosity really is. Motor oil is BY FAR the most important component in an engine, and the science and advancements behind it is INSANE in the past 30 years.
 

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Just to clarify some confusion here, the rating goes to winter rating then high performance rating. The number before the "W" is for a temperature until which the oil will provide lubrication. The number to look out for is -40 Celsius (whichhappens to equal -40 Fahrenheit.) A 0W30 oil is 'good to go' until -40C; a 5W30 oil is until -35C, a 10W30 is good until-20C, and so on. The second number is the 'high temperature rating' which is (to simplify) until how 'high' the oil will provide proper lubrication in high temperature (not outside, but inside the engine when you're revving high, going fast, etc..) SO I live in warm California, I don't care about winter rating at all, but I drive like a (madman) -ehm, normal local, so I REALLY focus on the second number. My motorcycles use 10W40 or 10W50, since they rev high, etc... "back in the day" there was different oils for the winter and the summer, but now the 'all season' oils make life MUCH better for basically everyone in the world. If you really wanna get the best for your engine, you should be up to date which is the latest standard is, since it's not really the brands that matter but the different testing standards and certificates. If anyone puts a XXw20 oil in their car instead of the originally recommendedXXw30, I'd really consider 2 things: Engineers REALLY KNOW what's good for your engine; YOU should really consider if you drive like a normal person, or a grandma, or like a madman.. I see a logic by using a XXw20 could reduce fuel consumption, but you'd never be able to sell me a quart, because of 2 things: I know how I drive, and XXw30 was originally recommended; AND gas is cheaper than engine wear. Please for the love of God, don't say or listen to light/heavy/thin or any of these words. Most people only use this because they can't comprehend what viscosity really is. Motor oil is BY FAR the most important component in an engine, and the science and advancements behind it is INSANE in the past 30 years.
Old dead thread 2007. None of those members have been posting for a while. Decent info for others for someone.
 
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