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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got an SRT intake for my IS300 and need somebody to attach the intake and connect the ECU piggy-back. Im located in Southern cali (By LAX) and the south-bay / long beach area.
Also im willing to pay for your time.

Thanks,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply; im confident I can install the intake but I’m just hesitant about soldering; I never soldered anything before and really do not want to risk making a mistake on my car.
 

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Boostin in the 505
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Soldering is pretty easy. Take one end of your wire and strip it. Then heat the end of the 1st wire up till it will melt the solder around the wire and coat it. Do the same to the other wire. So now you have two wire ends covered in solder. Now put the two together and apply heat. When the solder of the two wires melt together hold the ends in place till it cools. For taping into a wire its pretty much the same. You can allways do some practice runs on some spare wire you might have laying around. The are lots of instruction online you can follow as well.
 

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Soldering is pretty easy. Take one end of your wire and strip it. Then heat the end of the 1st wire up till it will melt the solder around the wire and coat it. Do the same to the other wire. So now you have two wire ends covered in solder. Now put the two together and apply heat. When the solder of the two wires melt together hold the ends in place till it cools. For taping into a wire its pretty much the same. You can allways do some practice runs on some spare wire you might have laying around. The are lots of instruction online you can follow as well.
A simple correction and a simpler method:
Strip the two wires to be soldered together. Twist the two wires around each other (keep it straight so when you go to tape it up the tape can easily cover it). Then apply the soldering gun on the twisted wires and then melt the solder onto it, when it gets hot enough the solder will "wick" and get sucked into the wires, allow to cool down and the tape it up. Make sure there are no sharp edges on the joint that can cut through the tape.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies; i feel fairly confident to attempt to install the piggy-back now and will do as Tyler Cruz suggested and practice on some old wires.
also I saw this soldering gun on TV: would anybody advise against it or should i find a traditional soldering tool?

they have this at my local target for 19.99
 

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Boostin in the 505
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Don't buy the cold heat gun. It's a pain to get it to make the correct contact to melt the solder. It also takes along time to build up heat. Just go with a quality original style gun/iron. I suggested the soldering way I did because you can use heat shrink to cover your solder work and it looks better than tape. Whatever way you decide they will both work well.
 

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Don't buy the cold heat gun. It's a pain to get it to make the correct contact to melt the solder. It also takes along time to build up heat. Just go with a quality original style gun/iron. I suggested the soldering way I did because you can use heat shrink to cover your solder work and it looks better than tape. Whatever way you decide they will both work well.

You can heat shrink it if you like. However, your method is not considered proper by many folks due to the fact that you are using solder to make the contact. Solder creats a resistance value that can actually be measured AND can create heat at the joint on wires that carry load. Also if by chance if any of your joints get a cold solder then you will definitely be chasing your tail around to find the problem. Using the method I described you are first joining the wires together by wraping them around each other then the soldering process simply makes it permanent, there is virtually no resistance rise from the way I described it and is actually the preferred way amongst electronic/electrical engineers.
 

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Boostin in the 505
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You can heat shrink it wither you. However, your method is not considered proper by many folks due to the fact that you are using solder to make the contact. Solder creats a resistance value that can actually be measured AND can create heat at the joint on wires that carry load. Also if by chance if any of your joints get a cold solder then you will definitely be chasing your tail around to find the problem. Using the method I described you are first joining the wires together by wraping them around each other then the soldering process simply makes it permanent, there is virtually no resistance rise from the way I described it and is actually the preferred way amongst electronic/electrical engineers.
That's how I normaly do it. Saw the method I discribed being done at a local shop and thought it was pretty slick. Didn't think it would matter but thanks for the clarafication Mo.
 

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Hey Mo nice to see ya.

A simple correction when it comes to soldering. If you do the twist method you run a high chance of a cold solder joint. The best method is like mentioned above then connect the wires side to side. Keep the stripped part small and then connect the wires side by side.

Why are people still using 3m elec tape??

Go to any supply store, get some heat shrink and put it on the wire before you solder up. After the joint cools push the shrink to the soldered area and use a lighter to heat it up, if you don't have a heat gun.

I have picked up soldering in the last two years, nothing is worse than a cold joint and even more so if you are doing a bunch of soldering and cannot find the bad solder.


D
 

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On a side note, lets say you are tapping into something and when done it will look like a T , you can still use heat shrink to cover the area. Buy bigger heat shrink to cover the area before the T, and cover the other area with smaller shrink. Once the area is ready for the shrink, push the smaller shrink to the cross of the T and heat it up. Then take the larger shrink and push the wire down where the solder joint was before you covered it with the smaller shrink. Then heat that shrink up to cover the connection, the solder, the smaller shrink all in one. If I get time tonight Ill mock this up and post pics in the mobile electronics area as a guide.

D
 

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Who the hell uses tape anymore? are you serious? I can't count how many times I've seen tape slide off a joint like that! HORRIBLE advice! ALWAYS use heatshrink!!!!!!!! Especially when you're talking about ECU wiring!

Kane
 

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Who the hell uses tape anymore? are you serious? I can't count how many times I've seen tape slide off a joint like that! HORRIBLE advice! ALWAYS use heatshrink!!!!!!!! Especially when you're talking about ECU wiring!

Kane
Actually I do. And no you cannot use just any type of tape. There is ONLY one type of tape I will use. 3M Super 33+. I can guarantee you that once the tape is applied properly you will not be able to take it off and it will hold up for years with under hood temperatures.

Not horrible advice. I do actually practice what I preach. And yes I can also guarantee you that I have most definitely wired more ecu's in cars than I can care to count.
 

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Hey Mo nice to see ya.

A simple correction when it comes to soldering. If you do the twist method you run a high chance of a cold solder joint. The best method is like mentioned above then connect the wires side to side. Keep the stripped part small and then connect the wires side by side.
Sorry I do not agree with that at all. Here is a video of someone that I do agree with. Can anyone tell me what the key sentence is in the video? YouTube - How to Do It: Basic Soldering



is300soon said:
Why are people still using 3m elec tape??
Not just any 3M tape, only the super 33+, if you have not tried this particular model, then I suggest picking one roll up and trying one.


is300soon said:
Go to any supply store, get some heat shrink and put it on the wire before you solder up. After the joint cools push the shrink to the soldered area and use a lighter to heat it up, if you don't have a heat gun.

I have picked up soldering in the last two years, nothing is worse than a cold joint and even more so if you are doing a bunch of soldering and cannot find the bad solder.
D
Well I have been soldering for ... (Damn now my true age will show) ... 25+years.
... Knock on wood ... I have never had issues with cold solder. The key to not having cold solder joints is to make sure you have a good gun, don't cheap out on the gun, use good quality solder and make sure the wires you are soldering are clean and have no oxidation.
 

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Actually I do. And no you cannot use just any type of tape. There is ONLY one type of tape I will use. 3M Super 33+. I can guarantee you that once the tape is applied properly you will not be able to take it off and it will hold up for years with under hood temperatures.

Not horrible advice. I do actually practice what I preach. And yes I can also guarantee you that I have most definitely wired more ecu's in cars than I can care to count.
+1 on the 3M Super 33+, its good shit and i have NEVER had a problem with it 'sliding off'
 

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Thanks for the replies; i feel fairly confident to attempt to install the piggy-back now and will do as Tyler Cruz suggested and practice on some old wires.
how are your practice runs coming along ;) it is very easy to pick up so i'm sure you'll have it on in no time... best of luck
 

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Kane you were right, listen heat shrink is the safe method end of story, no residue to ever mess with anything in the long run... Taping ehhhh

I use a Weller TC202 unit with a TC201 gun.

D
 

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Actually I do. And no you cannot use just any type of tape. There is ONLY one type of tape I will use. 3M Super 33+. I can guarantee you that once the tape is applied properly you will not be able to take it off and it will hold up for years with under hood temperatures.

Not horrible advice. I do actually practice what I preach. And yes I can also guarantee you that I have most definitely wired more ecu's in cars than I can care to count.
And you told this beginner to use 3M +33 tape from the get go? Didn't see that part. I've used the +33 before and it does slide off with heat. I don't like any kind of tape for a hot application on wires, it's the cheapest way you can do something, and it's not much faster than doing it properly once you know how to do it.

Plus, you're not supposed to use soldering GUNS, only use irons that are ESD safe when doing ECU or sensor wiring, and remember to unplug the harness from the ECU while soldering the wires to further safegaurd against ESD. Remember, we're talking to people that have never soldered and need tips on what to do for their first time, they don't know how long to apply the solder, or the simple skills of soldering without making a mess just cause they've never done it before.

I've been soldering for 21 years+, have my Bachelors in Electrical Engineering, went through several ISO9000 and 9001 certified soldering classes, and not a single one taught us how to solder like that, ever. I've NEVER had an issue with wiring on any car, or anything I've ever done, ever, and I take pride in that.


Listen, if you want a fool proof way of making a connection using a method that DOESN'T use tape, doesn't create sharp points, and is doesn't shorten the wire by pulling on it to make a point connection (which also stresses the wire), try this:

Things you'll need:
25W Soldering iron with stand and sponge.
1/8", 3/16" and 1/4" ID size heatshrink
Scissors, wire cutters, strippers
Rosin Core 60/40 solder (60% tin is best for conduction and avoiding cold solder, don't get anything less, and don't spend a mint on silver solder, not worth it in this case).
Heatgun or Lighter
A roll of solder wick for soaking up excess solder.

All this can be done at radio shack for $50 (if you don't buy a heat gun) and you'll have it for a loooong time.


Get some heatshrink in the sizes needed for the wire being used. Heatshrink shrinks to 50% of it's original size, so if you get a pice that slides over the wire loosly, you'll be in good shape, too big and it won't shrink enough

Slide a 3/8" - 1/2" length piece over one end of the cut wire (preferably the longest end of the wire coming from the sensor to avoid heat from the solder and iron)
Strip 1/4" off each end of the wire, hold the bare wire to each other at a 90 degree angle, Twist the wires together as like you're inter-twining them, get them to seat tightly together and when you're done twisting the wire, the two ends should be fairly straight.
Touch the iron on the joint with very light pressure and hold Solder on the joint next to the tip and let it flow into the wire nicely, moving it around to make sure the wire is saturated with solder, adding a little solder at a time.
It should be a nice silver color. Remove any extra solder blobs with the iron tip to make sure it's smooth joint. Once it cools a little, slide the heatshrink over the joint and use a heatgun or lighter at distance to shrink it on.

Now you have a fool proof joint that conducts perfectly, doesn't stress the wire, will hold till the end of time, won't get any condensation in the joint, won't poke through cause there are no sharpe points and won't short out. If anybody tells you that it's not a good joint they're full of shit! (as long as you did it right, haha)

I should create a DIY with pics sometime, it's really really easy people. I'd suggest practicing on some spare junk wire of the same size to get used to it and hone your skills before you start messing with a $2000 ecu.

Kane
 

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we've(SRT) probably wired up more cars in a week then you ever will in your entire life and we have had no issues with super 33+. so save all that degree BS, pick up a wrench and work/learn the automotive after market industry first...hell most shops don't even solder or use cheap e-tape, seen it too many times. I usually stay quiet on this forum, but some of you "experts" crack me up :lol: carry on....
 
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