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ARP is the way to go. The part number you need is ARP 100-7715

However, if you don't shorten them, they'll be WAY too long. also, the rear brake drums will need to be disassembled to finagle the longer studs into the rear hubs...
 

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Sounds like you got the wrong wheels.
That wasn't my default assumption. Unfortunately, it's rare for wheel offset, sizing, style, price-point and availability to all coincide simultaneously.

Sometimes tradeoffs must be made. Wheel spacers aren't "bad" as a rule, especially when they're limited to ~1/2" thick. I would definitely recommend avoiding the style that bolt to the hub, and have the wheel bolted to the spacer. Those are terrible.
 

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Mr. Roo
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That wasn't my default assumption. Unfortunately, it's rare for wheel offset, sizing, style, price-point and availability to all coincide simultaneously.

Sometimes tradeoffs must be made. Wheel spacers aren't "bad" as a rule, especially when they're limited to ~1/2" thick. I would definitely recommend avoiding the style that bolt to the hub, and have the wheel bolted to the spacer. Those are terrible.
The problem I have with the thin spacers with extended studs is you loose the lip of the inside center bore bit that holds the wheels in place concentrically. t least with the bolt-on type, you can get them with the inner lip. Even just 5 mm means 5 mm less holding the wheel in place concentrically. IDK. I guess I don't like making compromises on things when it comes to safety. Not saying I never have, just that I learned the hard/expensive way lol.

That said, I'd love to see what ultra rare wheels these are lol
 

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The problem I have with the thin spacers with extended studs is you loose the lip of the inside center bore bit that holds the wheels in place concentrically. t least with the bolt-on type, you can get them with the inner lip. Even just 5 mm means 5 mm less holding the wheel in place concentrically. IDK. I guess I don't like making compromises on things when it comes to safety. Not saying I never have, just that I learned the hard/expensive way lol.

That said, I'd love to see what ultra rare wheels these are lol
Hubrings might be effective when dealing with flat-bottomed lugnuts (OEM on our IS300), but hubrings are certainly not able to hold/maintain concentricity when used in an application that uses tapered seat conical lug nuts.

If there is non-concentricity in the relationship between the wheel bearing and the wheel-stud bolt circle, OR non-concentricity between the wheel outer diameter and the wheel's bolt circle, do you think a crappy little plastic or aluminum ring (that easily slips over the lip on the hub) is going to solve this?

To do so, they'd need to resist the force of 5 conical lugnuts trying to center themselves in a tapered bore, as they are torqued to ~100lbft. Ain't happening.
 

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Hubrings might be effective when dealing with flat-bottomed lugnuts (OEM on our IS300), but hubrings are certainly not able to hold/maintain concentricity when used in an application that uses tapered seat conical lug nuts.

To do so, they'd need to resist the force of 5 conical lugnuts trying to center themselves in a tapered bore, as they are torqued to ~100lbft. Ain't happening.
as someone who has never used hubrings on my car and never had a problem, this is what ive always assumed is going on. i can watch the wheel center itself when im tightening all of the lug nuts in the proper sequence. the 60 degree seat (multiplied by 5 in a circle), acts as a concentric aligning tool. of course, buying quality products (arp studs, rays wheels, etc) probably helps a lot in the end.

im always checking my tire pressures (stretched tires...) and ensuring my lug nuts are always tight. i think this also helps me.
 
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