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All figures are in Imperial (miles per gallon)

IS250 AWD - 27 city/37 highway
IS250 RWD (auto) - 29 city/42 highway
IS250 RWD (manual) - 24 city/37 highway
IS350 RWD (auto) - 26 city/37 highway

Okay, Lexus of Canada also rates the current IS300 at 22/32, and we all know that the US ratings were more like 18/25 on the car.

so by my rough calculations, we are looking at:

IS250 AWD (auto) - 23/30
IS250 RWD (auto) - 25/35
IS250 RWD (manual) - 20/30
IS350 RWD (auto) - 22/30

Still not too damn shabby. Odd that the 250 stick is rated lower than the auto. Are the two cars geared that much differently?

How the heck does Canada calculate these things? Do they put the car on a lift with the tires in the air or something to get ratings this high?
 

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Good find, Ratman009.

With proper Imperial gallon-to-U.S gallon conversion, the precise numbers in miles per U.S gallons are (assuming combined mileage = 55% x city + 45% x highway):
IS250 AWD (auto) - 22.49 city/30.82 highway => 26.24 combined (25.41 per lexus.jp)
IS250 RWD (auto) - 24.15 city/34.98 highway => 29.02 combined (27.76 per lexus.jp)
IS250 RWD (manual) - 19.99 city/30.82 highway => 24.86 combined (N/A for JDM)
IS350 RWD (auto) - 21.65 city/30.82 highway => 25.78 combined (23.53 per lexus.jp)

I guess the JDM figures are lower because they do a lot more city driving than we do.:D

It is indeed unusual that the manual 250 gets the worst mileage of all (even worse than the IS350), but not impossible. My guess is that the high gear ratios (for a faster acceleration) exclusively for the manual gearbox has to do with it.
 

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The Canadian government's fuel consumption testing standards are pure bullshit. At first I was wondering why the fuel mileage ratings were so high on the window stickers of IS300's... and then I read the testing standards!

Here they are...

Testing procedures for vehicle fuel consumption

New vehicles are "run in" for about 6000 km before testing. Vehicles are mounted on a programmable two-wheel laboratory chassis dynamometer and, using two-wheel drive, are run through simulated city and highway driving cycles. This carefully controlled method of testing, including the use of standardized fuels, laboratories and testing equipment, is used instead of on-road driving to ensure that all vehicles are tested under identical conditions.

Fuel consumption ratings are generated based on test cycles and correction factors that take into account the aerodynamic efficiency, weight, rolling resistance, drive mode of different vehicles and average real-world driving conditions in Canada. Other adjustments are made to reflect the average fuel consumption of vehicle configurations, options and sales mixes sold in Canada.

All vehicles, including four-wheel (4×4) and all-wheel drive (AWD), are tested in two-wheel drive (2WD) mode.

Simulated city course

City fuel consumption ratings are based on a 22-minute simulated drive of 12 km, with 16 complete stops. The average speed of the test is 32 km/h.

Simulated highway course

Highway fuel consumption ratings are based on a 12-minute simulated highway course of 16 km with no stops. The top speed during the test is 96.5 km/h, and the average speed of the test is 77 km/h, reflecting an urban-highway driving environment.
 

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Crester said:
Vehicles are mounted on a programmable two-wheel laboratory chassis dynamometer and, using two-wheel drive, are run through simulated city and highway driving cycles.

All vehicles, including four-wheel (4×4) and all-wheel drive (AWD), are tested in two-wheel drive (2WD) mode.
:screwy:

Guess we'll just have to wait for the official EPA figures then...
 

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Makes tons of sense on a car that will be in AWD all the time. :screwy:
 
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