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Discussion Starter #1
I am interested in becoming a Lexus mechanic. Is there any special schooling or anything required for this? I know my friend took a course to become an Audi mechanic. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I would suggest going to a school that actually teaches you how to work on cars. Here in Nashville there's a school called Nashville Auto Diesel College(NADC). One of my friends friends went there and graduated to go on to work for BMW as a mechanic. There's probably schools like this all over the U.S. I think the program lasts for like a yr or yr and 1/2. But be prepared to pay that damn tuition. hahaha Hope this helps.
 

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lexus has a program at auto schools like lincoln tech and uti. i took my audi training at uti. almost all auto schools have dealer programs and they find jobs for you when you graduate.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
TIESTO said:
I would suggest going to a school that actually teaches you how to work on cars. Here in Nashville there's a school called Nashville Auto Diesel College(NADC). One of my friends friends went there and graduated to go on to work for BMW as a mechanic. There's probably schools like this all over the U.S. I think the program lasts for like a yr or yr and 1/2. But be prepared to pay that damn tuition. hahaha Hope this helps.
That would be perfect being that I live in Nashville TN. I will check into it. I tried to call Lexus and speak with the Manager on my question but have not had a chance to speak to him yet. Thanks for the help, I will be looking into this. +rep for the help


EDIT: Tiesto is the shit!!
 

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You don't necessarily have to go to a mechanic school or anything. As long as you have some knowledge in the automotive repair feel, it should be enough to get yourself inside the door. They'll probably start you off as a lube tech and have you work your way up. Depending on your working skill and your ability to progress, you might impress the service manager, and he/she might be willing to send you off to factory training.

However if you do decide to go to school you will have a choice of a certificate program (1 year) or a associates (2 years) depending on the choice of school. UTI is a awesome place, I know a few instructors and teachers here at the new location in Norwood MA. But they are very strict, when I say strict I mean strict. They go by the 3 strikes and you're out rule, meaning 3 tardy (even 1 min) you are out. I know a few guys who takes the school very seriously and they say its fun.

There are potential in the automotive field. But starting pay will def suck ass (25-32k starting off). Once you work your way up, you could get into the 6 digits figure, I am not shitting you. I know a shop foreman making almost 100k a year, a Nissan service manager making 115k a year. Location is the main factor.

In my case, I went 2 years through school and got an associate, and could go another 2 years for a bachelor for management position. At the moment I am thinking about a career change (mechanical engineering) but if that doesn't work out I might head off to either Lexus or Nissan, whichever offers me a better pay.

Last thing, be prepared to constantly be buying tools! I have already invested in about 10k in tools in two years. That does not include the storage box. I believe from what I was told from old timers, a complete and full tool box for a auto mechanic will be worth an average of 50-60k without storage box. Many of the time you will spend money on tools you lost or some1 stole.
 

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I have to second that form Eminence about UTI - my bro completed classes at UTI and took the Hot Rod and VW finishing classes (VW offers the best payemtn and reimbursement packages). He has worked at Ford, Chevy, Acura, Porsche/BMW/Merc, and recently VW. He loved UTI.

You can start at the ground up as a lube tech or porter, but this is a slow process and most of the guys are formally trained, from what I undertsand. At UTI, there is a specializedd program for every luxury auto group, Hot Rods, and watercraft.

The other top school is Wyoming Tech. Many of the UTI instructors come from there as well.
 

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It would be a fun job. One of my friends is a mechanic at the local Lexus dealership. He does all of the engine diagnostic work. Just some of the stories he tells, it just seems like a good place to work, especially if you like working on cars. Before I got my IS350 he was telling me about a school they sent him to on the IS about a month ago. They basically teach you everything about the car, plus he took it for a spin (~120MPH). I learned more about that IS from that conversation than I could have wanted to know. The other plus is that you'll get some good discounts. Good luck man!
 

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^ You must be refering to the factory training. But yea, those are the advantages. With automotive, starting off you will def need to suck it in and do what you have to do to gain a higher position. I wouldn't care if I got a suckass pay at the dealership, as long as they agree to send me off to factory sponsored training I would be goood. Once I complete the training I am a factory certified master tech, meaning top dollar pay (approx $25-32/HR FLAT RATE).

As to employee discounts, every dealership varies. But I know for lexus, if you complete their factory training, Lexus will pay a 3rd ( i am not sure if this is correct, but its a good chunk) of the cost of a new car.

Here's my opinion, try to stay away from European cars. They are a bitch to work on, engineers dont put mechanics in mind when they design cars. However they do pay top bucks. I personally hate European cars, esp. Audi and VW.
 

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Eminence said:
Here's my opinion, try to stay away from European cars. They are a bitch to work on, engineers dont put mechanics in mind when they design cars. However they do pay top bucks. I personally hate European cars, esp. Audi and VW.
Amazingly, VW has the best pay for incoming mechanics and the best programs to pay for schooling. Some other brands may not reimburse your entire specializationg (coming from UTI) and you have to fron the bill yourself.

European brands typically have lower reliablility, so there's more warranty work to be done.
 

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Spazdoc said:
Amazingly, VW has the best pay for incoming mechanics and the best programs to pay for schooling. Some other brands may not reimburse your entire specializationg (coming from UTI) and you have to fron the bill yourself.

European brands typically have lower reliablility, so there's more warranty work to be done.

I completely agree. VW does pay good, but the car is a bitch to work on thats why. I am not sure about reimbursement for school, but any dealership would be able to send you off to factory sponsored training and cover you for the cost of the training and living expense.

You are also correct about the warranty stuff but I rather be fixing customer paying vehicles, the pay time is higher and it could even be for the same job, the only difference is who is paying (manufacterer or the customer).

From my years of dealing with all sorts of cars and even reading about them, european cars tend to focus more on luxury then anything else. In order to make a car luxurious, comfortable, quiet, etc. there are alot of thing sacrificed. I.e softer suspension component which leads to fast wearing materials.
 

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my dealership payed for all my training as long as i meet my 2 year contract of working there witch was 5 years ago. im made 68k last year first year was 40k not bad money for working on audi and vw. its all about how big the dealership is and how much money they want to spend.and when new model cars come out i get sent to training out of state the pay for drive time.fly time and hotel,food but no alcohol reinbursement
 

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As for getting into a specific line of cars, first they start you off to get your ASE's to become a certified master mechanic, then after that you go into the dealership program.

This is currently the route i am taking. ASE at my local community college, because UTI out here in chicago quite frankly was a joke *even the one down in FL was a joke*, and after that, i'll be going to one of the toyota/lexus schools. Probably one that is offered from DADC.
 

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Seven said:
As for getting into a specific line of cars, first they start you off to get your ASE's to become a certified master mechanic, then after that you go into the dealership program.

This is currently the route i am taking. ASE at my local community college, because UTI out here in chicago quite frankly was a joke *even the one down in FL was a joke*, and after that, i'll be going to one of the toyota/lexus schools. Probably one that is offered from DADC.

You don't have to go to school to take your ASE test. I also want to clarify that its a total of 8 ASE test you have to take to become a certified master tech. You also don't have to be ASE certified to become a manufacter specific master tech.
 

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First off, from a Lexus mechanic's perspective, i would NOT do it over again. My boyfriend and I both work at Lexus of Seattle and absolutely hate it. Just the politics of the dealership is rediculously unfair.

Second, I am going through TOYOTA factory training, which im taking through a community college program called T-TEN (Toyota Technical Education Network), that requires you to pass a certain amount of ASE's to graduate from the program (Associates Degree, all gen ed classes requried).

Lexus dealerships do NOT have factory training. The company Lexus does, but you pay for that out of your own pocket unless the dealer is willing to pay for traveling and class expenses.

As for being a Audi mechanic, its like shooting yourself in the foot (my boyfriend and brother actually went through UTI and both hate Audi with a passion.).
 

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BlueISgurl said:
First off, from a Lexus mechanic's perspective, i would NOT do it over again. My boyfriend and I both work at Lexus of Seattle and absolutely hate it. Just the politics of the dealership is rediculously unfair.

Second, I am going through TOYOTA factory training, which im taking through a community college program called T-TEN (Toyota Technical Education Network), that requires you to pass a certain amount of ASE's to graduate from the program (Associates Degree, all gen ed classes requried).

Lexus dealerships do NOT have factory training. The company Lexus does, but you pay for that out of your own pocket unless the dealer is willing to pay for traveling and class expenses.

As for being a Audi mechanic, its like shooting yourself in the foot (my boyfriend and brother actually went through UTI and both hate Audi with a passion.).
Every dealership is different. Just because it holds the name Lexus or Toyota doesn't mean they will be run the same or work the same way as eachother. I know guys from the same work place who loves it and some who hates it. The same goes for the whole factory training deal, some dealership will pay for you to go and some will not. But i know for a fact that if they do pay for you, you will be contracted to employ for them for a certain period of time and if you don't fulfill those agreed time you will have to pay pro rata.

I agree with you about being a Audi tech. I hate working on European cars period. Audi, VW, Porsche they are all the same "crap-o".

I am leaning towards either Toyota or Nissan, but more towards Nissan. I know a guy who made a killer working for Nissan. After 5 years of working for Nissan he was able to afford opening up his own 6 bay shop.
 
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