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See my post above about the jack jaw
I mean, it's a nice attachment but, it's not a solution. When I have my car on 4 jackstands, I want some secure place to put them without worrying about the sheet metal bending. I suspect it would be a hassle trying to get 4 of those things to line up. The cost isn't insignificant either.

I want a solution that'll let me throw any kind jack under the corner and not have to worry about it bending over.
 

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THE MAKER
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Jack stands go on the frame rail or rear subframe. Our jack jaw is self aligning as long as you present a flat surface. I used rubber pucks for years but they will fold the metal as much as we jack on the car. The jack jaw also clings in place and I have taken them in the track and they still stick on there.

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Cherisher
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Me Oh My. Never gave second thought to such a thing. I'm aware of Jack Jaws but now know why they exist :lol:

...always jacked the car up under the allocated points. never an issue. makes one wonder how that actually happens.
 

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Me Oh My. Never gave second thought to such a thing. I'm aware of Jack Jaws but now know why they exist :lol:

...always jacked the car up under the allocated points. never an issue. makes one wonder how that actually happens.

Certainly if someone used the wrong tool, IE a bottle jack it will bend them over like cardboard. It is all about surface area. FIGS Jack Jaws are probably the best bang for the buck and do look the nicest.

To the OP, look at your factory jack in the rear driver side and you will figure out what toyota was thinking, it just requires a little more care and patience. My 82 CelicaSupra had the same pinch rails, same factory jack, and the same chronic mangled jack points.
 

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Cherisher
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Certainly if someone used the wrong tool, IE a bottle jack it will bend them over like cardboard.
yeah... wrong tools are used on this car everyday :(
bottle jacks are for solid axles, pumpkins and cradles. I've even used them as a bushing press but never as a unibody frame jack.

There are marks/cutouts on our undercarriage to point out specifically where to jack this car up on the frame. If they're not intact, someone did it wrong... sorry, just stating the obvious.
 

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THE MAKER
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Me Oh My. Never gave second thought to such a thing. I'm aware of Jack Jaws but now know why they exist :lol:

...always jacked the car up under the allocated points. never an issue. makes one wonder how that actually happens.
I think the leading cause of this is that the jacks used do not have a perfectly parallel head on them and they pull in as the rise. A bottle jack would work fine as it goes straight up and never changes its support platform angle. these aluminum jacks that are sold these days twist and deflect and as soon as you are off center, the pinch seam goes. The jack jaw does a good job of centering the load as well as getting behind side skirts. On the IS-F its a must because the skirts hang to low to get a jack under anyway.
 

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Cherisher
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I think the leading cause of this is that the jacks used do not have a perfectly parallel head on them and they pull in as the rise. A bottle jack would work fine as it goes straight up and never changes its support platform angle.
A normal floor jack would have wheels to compensate for the change in angle, i.e.: it will move/roll with the cars rising angle.

A bottle jack will remain stationary on the floor and push up into the changing angle of the vehicle, thus, bending the weakest point, i.e.: the car is moving up and sideways but the bottle jack is only going straight up.
 

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Cheap bottle jacks (and trolley jacks) also have undersized saddles esp ones meant for a steel boxed frame vehicle. Small surface area contact in most car related repairs = fail most of the time
 

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THE MAKER
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A normal floor jack would have wheels to compensate for the change in angle, i.e.: it will move/roll with the cars rising angle.

A bottle jack will remain stationary on the floor and push up into the changing angle of the vehicle, thus, bending the weakest point, i.e.: the car is moving up and sideways but the bottle jack is only going straight up.
that is just it, with undersized rollers on rough asphalt the jack remains stationary. Old jacks had huge rollers. Also the jacks angle changes much more than the jack points when rising, that is why the factory scissor jack is a straight rise jack. But the factory jacks work horribly on uneven surfaces as well. Bottom line is that if the load is not square it will fold and there are plenty of circumstance that can cause this.
 
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