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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys.

Since the recent MSRP price cuts at Lexus, I've been thinking about getting an IS250 AWD or IS350.

I'm in Ottawa and really don't know what to make of the risks associated with RWD+SNOW when all I've ever driven is FWD. Generally, the comments I get about RWD is that its horrible in snow but I also read that the snow button+winter tires on the IS should be ok ? :confused:

I never drive to work so being "caught" in a snowstorm is a low risk event. Generally I try to drive after the roads are plowed.

I always come back to the AWD. But fully loaded, $50k is a lot to pay for a 200hp car. Last month I could have got a fully loaded TSX(with nav) for $36k.

Anyone in my area with an IS 250 RWD or IS 350 care to comment ? :)
 

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I drive an IS350 here in the northern US, and it's manageable in the snow and ice IF you have a proper set of winter tires.

I use Bridgestone Blizzak LM25 on the original 18" wheels. They're a good compromise between snow traction and everyday performance. But there are other good snow tires out there.

If you can, get a set of dedicated 17" wheels and tires for winter.

The snow button helps, so does stability control.

I also keep a shovel in the trunk just in case, but never had to use it...
 

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I'll be honest with you... if you have three cars with the same winter tires... the order of ease to drive in the snow will be:

1. AWD
2. FWD
3. RWD

But... that being said... if you have winter tires you'll do fine in a RWD car in the snow. The only time this winter I've had trouble in the snow was when there was several inches... like 8 or more... of loosely packed snow. But then again... in that weather ANY car will have trouble. The only people that will move in relative ease are those in large/heavy true SUV's. My neighbour laughs at this weather in his Hummer H2.

But otherwise if you enjoy driving... you'll want RWD for sure.
 

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I've got Blizzak WS-50 on my IS250 RWD...

haven't had much problems so far... the only thing is that you can't 'power out' of a turn if you're in a patch of snow like you can in FWD... the old family car I drove, I can apply more power (on all seasons too) and still be able to pull myself out... but with RWD, you'll have a more difficult time turning... at least from what I noticed...

that said, this is the first winter I've had with a RWD car, I don't think I've fully grasp winter driving in a RWD just yet... but I'll get there eventually...
 

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Thanks ! Doesn't sound too bad afterall.

I've read about the Blizzak LM25 tires before, wouldn't it better to get something like the Revo1 ? At least according to:

Using the Right Tool for the Job

It all depends what your driving conditions are.

Where I live, the winter is mostly dry but cold with just a few snow falls. So I need tires that are good in low temperatures and decent in the snow, yet provide good, sporty performance in the dry.

Ottawa is colder and snowier than New York, so the Revo or some Nokians may be best for you.


In a nutshell:

Snow Tire <> Blizzak <> All-Season <> Summer Tire
Snow Performance <<<<< >>>>> Dry Performance


By the same token, because our springs and fall are wet and our summers include downpours, I use Eagle F1s as my summer rubber because they offer outstanding performance in the dry but also great hydroplaning resistance...
 

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I've got Blizzak WS-50 on my IS250 RWD...

haven't had much problems so far... the only thing is that you can't 'power out' of a turn if you're in a patch of snow like you can in FWD... the old family car I drove, I can apply more power (on all seasons too) and still be able to pull myself out... but with RWD, you'll have a more difficult time turning... at least from what I noticed...

that said, this is the first winter I've had with a RWD car, I don't think I've fully grasp winter driving in a RWD just yet... but I'll get there eventually...
Ive had the IS300 since Dec and getting a sense of drivin with RWD is a skill to be mastered. I find that even w snow tires and traction button there tends to be excess slippage. This past wk with all the snow i was sliddin around. its a little scary.
 

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If you drive normally it should not be any different then any other car. Just remember avoid stopping on a hill, keep your momentum going or else you may have a hard time getting going again. Also be easy on the throttle, unless you have experience with the tail out.

I'm personally on bald winter tires and i'm have no problem driving around. Getting going from a stop takes longer for me but once going i have no problem.
 

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Ive had the IS300 since Dec and getting a sense of drivin with RWD is a skill to be mastered. I find that even w snow tires and traction button there tends to be excess slippage. This past wk with all the snow i was sliddin around. its a little scary.
lexuriuz... what car did you have before this?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I drive my IS350 in the winter. As long as you got a set of snow tires you're good to go. Snowmode also helps.
Hey TurboSam, are you in Ottawa ?

I think I can rule out the IS250 AWD at this point. I can't deal with that hump in the driver's footwell. That narrows the choices down to either the IS350 or Infiniti G35x.
 

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don't forget about 335xi is nice BOOOOOOOST
 

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sooo I was doing some late night driving getting home from a concert..

I noticed something though... when I'm at a full stop, and get going, I ease the throttle and clutch in, car creeps forward, that's normal... then when I fully engage the clutch, and apply throttle gradually, there's some slippage due to the amount of snow on the ground. Normal again. I apply more throttle, the traction control light blinks (but no beeps) and my revs stay at like 2000rpm and just doesn't want to go up! It takes a long time before it does. Now, coming from a FWD car, I'm used to just dumping the throttle, take whatever traction I have available and steer the car with the momentum. This gets me out of most situations.

So that said, is the revs not increasing quickly because the traction control is on? Is there any techniques that can be utilize to start on a slippery surface quicker? Turns seem to be difficult because if traction is bad I don't seem to be able to make turns quick at all, which is dangerous during left turns.

What's everyone's thoughts?
 

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Hi guys.

Since the recent MSRP price cuts at Lexus, I've been thinking about getting an IS250 AWD or IS350.

I'm in Ottawa and really don't know what to make of the risks associated with RWD+SNOW when all I've ever driven is FWD. Generally, the comments I get about RWD is that its horrible in snow but I also read that the snow button+winter tires on the IS should be ok ? :confused:

I never drive to work so being "caught" in a snowstorm is a low risk event. Generally I try to drive after the roads are plowed.

I always come back to the AWD. But fully loaded, $50k is a lot to pay for a 200hp car. Last month I could have got a fully loaded TSX(with nav) for $36k.

Anyone in my area with an IS 250 RWD or IS 350 care to comment ? :)
I am in Ottawa and have an IS350 that I drive most days in the winter. I did not take it out this morning with the overnight snow in Ottawa. I have a set of Nokian snow tires that work well, I put them on the original rims and purchased new rims and tire pressure sensors. I just swap them out in the spring and late fall. If you take it easy, it is not so bad in the snow.
 

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sooo I was doing some late night driving getting home from a concert..

I noticed something though... when I'm at a full stop, and get going, I ease the throttle and clutch in, car creeps forward, that's normal... then when I fully engage the clutch, and apply throttle gradually, there's some slippage due to the amount of snow on the ground. Normal again. I apply more throttle, the traction control light blinks (but no beeps) and my revs stay at like 2000rpm and just doesn't want to go up! It takes a long time before it does. Now, coming from a FWD car, I'm used to just dumping the throttle, take whatever traction I have available and steer the car with the momentum. This gets me out of most situations.

So that said, is the revs not increasing quickly because the traction control is on? Is there any techniques that can be utilize to start on a slippery surface quicker? Turns seem to be difficult because if traction is bad I don't seem to be able to make turns quick at all, which is dangerous during left turns.

What's everyone's thoughts?
Yes, that's traction control kicking in. Try to upshift the second this happens.
 

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Yes, that's traction control kicking in. Try to upshift the second this happens.
yeah i was reading up on traction control a bit more

i suppose the way traction control kicked in with my old car is that it would do some braking on the side that is losing traction, but seems like for the 2IS, it actually retards the engine to cut the throttle ... I assume its almost like hitting the snow ETCS mode... which seems to limit engine output more ...
 
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