Lexus IS Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
594 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I had a few questions regarding the IS300...
What exactly does the LSD (limited slip differential) do?? Some of you mention that it isnt coming in the first batch of cars... when exactly is the "second" batch of cars coming w/ LSD and the graphite polished wheels?

Despite the badmouthing of the Acura CL about its lack of high end power, I am still keeping it in high consideration when I decide to buy a new car this summer. I dont really care about going 90+ and the 6.4 sec for 0-60 in the July MotorTrend seems good. I've never owned an acura or a lexus (had a toyota), and was wondering what you guys know about reliability of these 2 companies? Are replacement parts expensive for Lexus cars? Thanks in advance...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Others can explain LSD better, so I'll leave that to them.
Acura has cheaper parts if you need replacements. Both cars are extremely reliable, as my family has never had any problems with my sister's CRV, my Integra, my mother's LS400, my father's Previa, or my brother's Solara. Both car manufacturers are very reliable, and both (Lexus & Acura) have superb customer relations.

Just go with what you like, although I like the IS much more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,523 Posts
LSD is a drug that messes up your head. Hehehe...

Seriously though...

From the Lexus Website:

TORSEN® Limited-Slip Differential* (LSD)
The TORSEN® LSD system works in conjunction with TRAC, helping to limit wheelspin on unstable and slippery roads and during aggressive handling. This is why this type of system is considered a must for high-performance driving. LSD functions like a mechanical traction control system, in that it senses which drive wheel has the most traction and shifts torque (power) to that wheel to effectively deliver more horsepower to the road. And it also provides the IS 300 with enhanced control, increased acceleration and an improved margin of safety.
*TORSEN® is a registered trademark of Zexel Torsen, Inc.


[This message has been edited by JW (edited May 24, 2000).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,221 Posts
Thanks JW...

I will simplify:

It will ensure that you won't ever get one rear wheel stuck on a slippery surface.

For instance if your right rear wheel is on the shoulder of a snowy or muddy road the LSD will send power to the left rear still on the road... Without LSD the right rear could spin uncontrollably.

*BUT* electronic traction control can help you get unstuck by putting brakes on the right rear - so a car with traction control has less reason to need an LSD.

Another reason for LSD is if you have enough power to break the rear wheels free on dry pavement - you can do uniform two wheel "burnouts". LSD is your friend for high power burnouts. Traction control spoils your fun.

So - the LSD will be of most use to people who hop up their engines and turn off traction control.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
How com the first batch won't have it? My dealer/general manager said the first batch will be fully loaded...but few with ivory leather. and i got the one with lsd too
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
"A differential is basically a mechanical device that allows the wheel which sits on the outside (longer radius) of a road bend to spin faster than the wheel on the inside (shorter bend radius). These devices are used on the axles that hold the wheels that are driven by the engine and, in the case of a 4WD car, between axles. If no differential is present then the driven wheels would spin at the same speed in a turn thus rendering the handling of the car very unpleasant. Self-locking differentials add to the classic "free" differential described above the ability to lock (drive both wheels at the same speed) under certain conditions such as when wheel spin occurs. For instance by locking itself, the differential, allows to avoid the immobilization of the vehicle in situations such as when one wheel sits on snow while the other sits on dry tarmac. In this case, the absence of a locking device would send all engine torque to the wheel that spins faster (the one on the snow) and the car would not be able to extract itself. Locking the differential would split torque distribution on both wheels thus allowing the car to move forward.

"[The Torsen differential], invented by the American company Gleason corporation, is based on the non-reversibility of worm gears and worm wheels (i.e. when you turn the worm wheel the worm gear turns but not vice versa). The Torsen differential has the advantage of being a fully mechanical device which guarantees its instantaneous response and progressiveness. Its main advantages therefore resume to:

- Instantaneous response
- The linear character of its locking to speed difference curve
- No locking or speed difference inhibition under braking
- Integrates a "free" differential and a locking device in one part

The Torsen differential:



A: Differential housing
B: Out axle
C: Worm wheel
D: Worm gears
E: Synchromeshes
F: Hypoid wheel (from engine)
G: Out axle

"Torsen differentials are expensive devices. They split torque in a 50:50 proportion in no-slip conditions and can manage slips up to 20:80 ratios between the wheels they drive. The most important difference between Torsen differentials and viscous couplers is that the Torsen has a torque sensing characteristic while the [viscous coupling differential] has a rotation sensing characteristic. That's why Torsen differentials only lock when power is applied to them whereas viscous couplers lock both when power is applied and while braking."

All borrowed from an excellent page:
http://www.rallycars.com/Cars/4wd_turbo_cars.html">http://www.rallycars.com/Cars/4wd_turbo_cars.html

I was ecstatic when I heard the IS was going to be available with a Torsen LSD! It is truly a superior piece of mechanical technology...

Ty

[This message has been edited by TylerSoon (edited May 24, 2000).]
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top