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I have joined the club--the crash club that is. Seeing how my work schedule was a bit out of the oridinary this week, and I had to work this morning (my day off), I decided to "rest my eyes" while on the road today. I was on the 405 north almost about to get off at Lakewood and BAM. I scraped the right side of my car against the guard rail. My right headlight is ok, thank goodness, but my right front fender has a big dent in it with a scratch that goes all the way back to the rear fender which also has a dent in it. My bumpers are ok; just a little pushed dow--hardly noticeable to the unknowing eye. I also curbed my right front wheel--a nice OZ Superlegerra!

Well fuck, it was my fault. I was tired and I didn't pull over. I'm just venting because I have only myself to blame.

Do you think I should report it to my insurance co? I seriously think damages will cost about $1k-$1500 (without getting a new wheel)--my deductable is $500. I don't want my insurance rate to go up so I'm willing to pay out of pocket. What do you think I should do?

If you guys are tired, pull over for a soda, coffee, a nap or anything. I messed up a nice car for a stupid reason. I will try to post pics.


Me= :whine:

My car= :bitching:
 

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If that's the cost, probably better not to make a claim, if you can afford to pay for fixing it yourself.
 

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:eek: Aw , Jeez, Greggers !! :eek:

Not the Blue Flash! :whine: :whine: :cry: Hey man, long time no see. Sorry I hear from you like this but at least you're okay and didn't go off of a cliff or something!! Working crazy hours like I do sometimes, I've had several close calls and have fallen asleep at many a traffic light. :eek: :eek: You just gotta keep smacking your face real hard til you get home. :lol: Some places they even ticket sleep-related accidents similar to substance-impaired driving, but I'm sure you know that. :wink:
Maybe you can get the OZ repaired at a good wheel shop later and just get the fenders fixed up for now. I scratched up one of my wheels , too, but not too bad. Hope it isn't too much dough, eh. :-? :-?
Good luck with it. Hopefully catch up with you at a meet sometime soon, bro. 8)
 

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Vman said:
:eek: Aw , Jeez, Greggers !! :eek:

Not the Blue Flash! :whine: :whine: :cry: Hey man, long time no see. Sorry I hear from you like this but at least you're okay and didn't go off of a cliff or something!! Working crazy hours like I do sometimes, I've had several close calls and have fallen asleep at many a traffic light. :eek: :eek: You just gotta keep smacking your face real hard til you get home. :lol: Some places they even ticket sleep-related accidents similar to substance-impaired driving, but I'm sure you know that. :wink:
Maybe you can get the OZ repaired at a good wheel shop later and just get the fenders fixed up for now. I scratched up one of my wheels , too, but not too bad. Hope it isn't too much dough, eh. :-? :-?
Good luck with it. Hopefully catch up with you at a meet sometime soon, bro. 8)

Vance, where in hell have you been bro!! Yeah, it sucks, sorry to hear about your problems too. What have you been up to? PM me bro.


Thanks guys, the situation sucks, but I'm not hurt and it is just a car.
 

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yeah you should never drive when you're that tired, my girlfriend went home for a short vacation this week and it turns out one of her friends fell asleep at the wheel tuesday night and died in an accident. ive been there before and it's scary to all the sudden wake up and yer drifting toward the side of the road. dont be tough and try to fight through it.
 

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:eek:
that happened to me once but i didnt crash...i woke up in the middle of the road...right on dividing lines....going 55 in a 60 zone...with a full on traffic 50 ft in front of me...i hit the brakes...i have no clue what woke me up...

thank god noone was around me...
 

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I fell asleep once but luckly the reflector bumps dividing the lane woke me up. I was coming up on traffic also. I'll never close my eyes for a little rest after that. I also had a friend that wasnt so lucky, fell asleep 1 mile from her home and crashed into a brick wall totaling her car and just missing a telephone poll.
 

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a little tip for those who drive long distances....

if you push the head-rest all the way back so that you wont be tempted to let your head rest against it, that may keep you from doozing off...

also, set the temperature 5 degrees cooler. You stay more alert.
 

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HoustonLex said:
a little tip for those who drive long distances....

if you push the head-rest all the way back so that you wont be tempted to let your head rest against it, that may keep you from doozing off...

also, set the temperature 5 degrees cooler. You stay more alert.
opening the windows helps too :lol: :D
 

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Sorry to hear about that man, that's tough. My IS is accident free right now, and I'm crossing my fingers that it stays that way.

A tip for staying awake, set the temperature lower by a few degrees, and turn OFF the face vents. If the cold air is blowing into your eyes when you're tired, nothing feels better than closing your eyes.
 

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HoustonLex said:
a little tip for those who drive long distances....

if you push the head-rest all the way back so that you wont be tempted to let your head rest against it, that may keep you from doozing off...

also, set the temperature 5 degrees cooler. You stay more alert.
Good ideas. I usually roll down the windows and blast the music.

Also pull over somewhere and just take a quick 15-20 min nap. You'd be surprised how much that helps. I've been lucky as far as dozing off and not hitting anything a few times and finally realized it's better to take a quick nap in your car at Denny's 10 mins from home rather than just trying to make it.
 

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Thatis what my uncle did in his rx-7. You should get an estimate on how much it costs soyou know exactly. if it is low then fix it yourself dont claim it.
 

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damn, that sucks man. i was driving to havasu and falling asleep, but luckily the put those rough paving edges on the shoulder so those woke me up every time i drifted.

what worked really well for me on the way back when i was driving was eating. the little bit of activity involved in eating was just enough to keep me awake and alert for the whole drive.

-eric
 

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god damn...my dad just got into an accident today due to dozing off...he hit a car in front but the damage is minimal according to him...its not even worth fixing...he was driving a toyota sienna...thank god he didnt take my car out...

cops came, gave him a ticket, now we gotta pay it off... :cry:
my dad has the worst driving record... :pissed:
 

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I'm not sure what the damage looks like, but you should just call your insurance company and say someone side swiped it while it was parked...insurance isn't supposed to go up if it's no fault of your own...say you saw a lady who looked like Halle Barry drive off after hearing the accident, she has been known to do that before :lol:
 

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Hey guys...I got this email here at work the other day, and since it has everything to do with this topic, and many of us are guilty of falling asleep at the wheel (in some capacity anyways), I thought I'd share it with you. I work in music, hence the topic of summer festivals...but falling asleep at the wheel is falling asleep at the wheel...no matter where you're going, or where you came from. :boring: :shame:
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Crossing the Center Line: Tips for Staying Safe on the Roads During the Festival Season
By Rachel Seeger

The summer months find many of us packing up the car or RV and taking to the highway for music festivals and concerts across the country. Every year, lives are taken or altered forever by motor vehicle crashes that result from drowsy driving.

On July 9, 2002, three young women were on a 12-hour drive from Quincy, CA to Flagstaff, AZ returning from the High Sierra Music Festival. Their car went off the road about 100 miles west of Flagstaff, at approximately 5:00am, on Interstate 40. Jennifer Marie Benton was tossed from the vehicle and killed. Two others, Jodie Delaney and Jackie Birdsell, were critically injured and taken to Flagstaff Medical Center. In response to this incident, friends created the Operation Drive Safe - Driving for Jennifer campaign (http://www.drivingforjennifer.com) to educate others about safety issues related to sleep depravation, fatigue, drinking and driving. Sadly, yet another young life was taken this week following the High Sierra Music Festival under similar circumstances.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that motor vehicle crashes are the leading cause of injury death in the United States for people aged 1-34. In 1997, nearly 42,000 people died on the nation s roads and highways, and another 3.5 million suffered nonfatal injuries. Of the crashes that were reported by the police, drowsiness is the principal causative factor in about 100,000 crashes each year, according to estimates by the U.S. Department of Transportation's National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA). NHTSA estimates that about 4% of all fatal motor vehicle crashes each year are caused by driver drowsiness. However, the report warns that these estimates may be low due to inaccurate reporting methods for identifying a driver's state of alertness and the fact that most drivers involved in these crashes tend to downplay their driving condition to avoid blame.

The motor vehicle crash that took Jennifer Benton's life was caused by fatigue and drowsiness. Drowsiness can turn celebration into tragedy in just a few seconds. Those traveling home following concerts and festivals are at particular risk, especially if they've been sacrificing sleep during late night sets of music, have had a few drinks, and then set out on the road. Alcohol increases the risk of falling asleep behind the wheel. According to David Willis, president of the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, "When you're very tired, one drink feels like four or five. Driving is especially dangerous because you combine alcohol with fatigue." Fatigue is a key risk factor for crashes, slowing perception and response time.

Motor vehicle crashes are not "accidents" because they are preventable. Sleep experts recommend at least eight hours of sleep a night in order to function properly. More than half of adult drivers admitted to driving while drowsy and younger drivers (18-29) were more likely to drive drowsy than other age groups, reported a recent study by the National Sleep Foundation. The study also found that nearly one-quarter of young drivers, including college students and young workers, reported falling asleep at the wheel during the past year. Younger drivers were also more likely to drive faster when they felt drowsy, adding to their danger.

The National Sleep Foundation and the AAA Foundation offer the following tips for safe driving:

- Get a good night's sleep before setting off on a long trip -- at least 8 hours. Make sure that you are properly awake before setting off. Research shows that individuals who have had less sleep than usual the night before a journey experience high levels of sleepiness when driving on the following day, especially in the afternoon.

- Prepare for your journey in advance. Carry out any necessary packing of the car the night before you travel so you can begin the journey in a more relaxed frame of mind.

- Don't drive at night if you can avoid it. Internal biological "clocks" encourage most people to be awake in the daytime and to sleep at night and they will find it difficult to concentrate and maintain alertness between midnight and 7am.

- Turning up the radio and rolling down the window does NOT keep you awake. The only cure for drowsiness is sleep. On long trips take along a passenger who stays awake to talk to the driver.

- Schedule regular stops, every 100 miles or 2 hours. Swap drivers if possible.

- Avoid alcohol and medications that may impair performance.

- Recognize signs of fatigue: Drifting from your lane, hitting rumble strips, repeated yawning, difficulty focusing or keeping your eyes open, tailgating or missing road signs.

- Plan long trips carefully so that you allow plenty of breaks where you can relax and maybe have some food and drink. Heavy meals and certain foods, such as turkey, warm milk and bananas - induce sleep.

- Taking a power nap can help restore alertness. If you are feeling drowsy, pull off into a safe area and take a brief nap (15-45 minutes).

- Drink a caffeinated beverage to promote short-term alertness (remember: it takes about 30 minutes for caffeine to enter the bloodstream).

- Walk around or do a few exercises to get rid of grogginess.

- Set the cars ventilation controls so that they draw in cold, fresh air from the outside. Aim the air at your face. Winding down your car windows is not as effective and neither action will have a direct result on tiredness.

For more information about drowsy driving, and how to prevent it, visit the National Sleep Foundation website at http://www.sleepfoundation.org , Operation Drive Safe - Driving for Jennifer at http://drivingforjennifer.com, and the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety at http://www.aaafoundation.org.

Rachel Seeger is a Public Affairs Specialist with the US Department of Health and Human Services. She began her federal career as a 1993 Presidential Management Intern at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, where she was a legislative policy analyst working on traffic safety issues. In 1993, she received her Masters in Public Administration from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, CA. She may be reached for comment at [email protected].
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I know it's long, but something definitely worth thinking about.
 
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