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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Alright guys most of you know
I ordered a motor from JDM montreal Please see review in NORTH EAST section

http://my.is/forums/f110/buyer-bewa...on-p1mmiz321-live-com-2jzgte-purchase-507562/


I just decided to do a COLD compression test.
Here are the numbers
Cyl 1 70psi
Cyl 2 30psi
Cyl 3 35psi
cly 4 40psi
Cyl 5 45psi
Cly6 30 psi


I filled motor up with oil hooked up a starter and cranked it.

I pulled the lower oil pan off and a milky goo came off, from the oil I JUST put in 10 minutes earlier.

Here is a picture of some of the remains coming off the block


There is clearly water in cylinder 4 and some goo
My oil pan is also dented in!!!

And someone RTV'ed this whole engine together. Not a single stock gasket is in place anymore...

My suspect this head is warped... Anyone else have any insight?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Stock Headgaskets take over 1000HP of abuse!
Stock bottom ends with stock head bolts take over 800 WHP no problem

the only way this MLS headgasket blew would be if it over heated, and the head warped. the thermostat on this motor looks reall shitty too.
 

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And someone RTV'ed this whole engine together. Not a single stock gasket is in place anymore...
Most modern engines are held together with RTV. I'd check the color though I'm pretty sure Toyota uses red RTV for most things.

I'd be suspecting bent valves from a broken timing belt. Leakdown test will tell you where the compression is leaking from. Rings or valves.

the only way this MLS headgasket blew would be if it over heated, and the head warped. the thermostat on this motor looks reall shitty too.
HG's blow all the time in a million different ways. I agree though that the compression probably isn't HG. Valves, Rings or wrong valve timing. If the timing slipped, you won't get good compression either.
 

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A quick search , shows 2jz-gte vvti to be a non interference engine. Valves should not be able to hit the pistons, plus the jdm motors had even less aggressive cams.
More likely is your compression test is flawed, and the little bit of moisture was from the engine sitting in a shipping container / warehouse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The crank turns freely by hand. If it hit a valve i think i would hear it.
I am not concerned so much about the Valves being hit. More or less seeing if this was fucked with. The motor was put together with grey rtv, RTV even over stock gaskets.
I am almost positive its not stock, since certain areas with gaskets also have rtv over them. Soo much they actually go into the piping etc.

I will try to do a leak down but so far... not a very happy camper

thanks for the advice guys!
 

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Grey silicone FIPG is what Toyota uses from the factory. Remember a lot of these JDM engines sit in storage for several years. The cylinder walls and piston rings are probably rusted.

You have 2 options.
1. Risk it, install the engine, and crank it up. The movement of all the parts will eventually smooth out the cylinder walls and compression should come up. This is a big risk though! If compression does not come up, then you have to pull everything back apart lol.

2. Tear the engine apart, clean everything up, measure/inspect all clearances, hone cylinder walls to deglaze, and then reassemble the whole engine. This is what I do to EVERY single JDM engine I get. Doesn't matter if it has good compression or looks perfect. I still do a full teardown, cleaning, and rebuild of the engine. You never know what several years of sitting around can do to the engine internals.
 

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You could try and send the engine back and get your money back, but that's probably going to be a huge pain to do.

I would recommend you just do a full teardown of the engine. Or at least check the condition of the bearings. Since you have the oil pan off already, it's simple to pull the caps off the mains and rods. Do them one at a time unless you are ready to do a full teardown. If just inspecting, do one at a time. If the bearings are ok, then at least half of your battle is over with. The next step after that would be to pull the head off, and pop the pistons out for inspection.
 

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2. Tear the engine apart, clean everything up, measure/inspect all clearances, hone cylinder walls to deglaze, and then reassemble the whole engine. This is what I do to EVERY single JDM engine I get. Doesn't matter if it has good compression or looks perfect. I still do a full teardown, cleaning, and rebuild of the engine. You never know what several years of sitting around can do to the engine internals.
This is what I did with my first JDM swap. Pulled it apart and measured everything. Replaced the rings though, I don't think it needed it.
 

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These engines are coming out of Japanese junk yards so, while it sucks that the engines are bad it's not 100% unexpected. If I were to buy one, I'd get it from one of my local JDM places so, I have someplace to bitch too.

Might be worth taking apart and checking as soon as you get it too. Even if you're not going to install for awhile. I'd do a charge back on the CC if it was bad. Warranty or no warranty.
 
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