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There is one category that NSX is better at than Supra, and that is comfort level. Also, I have heard people said that you feel a bit more confident behind the wheel of a NSX than the Supra, and that Supra has quite a bit of body rolls for a car in this category. One thing I have always heard about NSX is that it has a tendency to swing the back around when you suddenly lift the throttle, which can be quite dangerous on street.
If it was me, I would go with NSX, just because I think it is a more refine car.
 

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My moto never buy american, they build em cheap, never lasts and it'll be in the shop more than you'll be driving it.

It's a no brainer, get the Lexus, get the chicks, and get the respect. Don't get the mustang or any other american car!!!!!



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Yellow IS300 w/LSD and graphite polished rims
 

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All the cars listed above the Supra also cost more than the Supra, the NSX and Ferrari by a small fortune. I will take the extra $$$ and mod the Supra. Keep in mind I'm not saying the NSX is a $hitty car, it's just that I'd much rather have a Supra. And another article...
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COMPARISON TEST: Life Begins at 40 (Grand)
An American, two Japanese, and a German battle for your children's inheritance.
By STEVEN COLE SMITH


Give up. Logic won't allow you to justify spending more than $40,000 for a luxury sports car. You can get the "luxury" and the "sports" cheaper elsewhere. Comfort is compromised, there's precious little passenger and luggage room, and if you're old enough to afford one of these cars, prepare to be accused of applying a topical salve to treat your midlife crisis.

But let's face it: You want one of these cars because you want one of these cars. Hey, we don't blame you.

In fact, we're here to help. If you're in the market for a nice, solid luxury sports car, allow us to present four: the new Chevrolet Corvette, the BMW M3, the Mitsubishi 3000GT VR4, and the Toyota Supra Turbo.

As with all our comparison tests, you're wondering why we chose this car, left out that car. Certainly, our $40,000-ballpark starting price could include the Mercedes-Benz SLK and the Porsche Boxster. But we were looking for something a bit more established, more powerful, more -- well, available. Even the new Corvette will be readily obtainable at your local Chevy dealer soon, if it isn't already, but it'll be awhile before the supply side of the SLK and Boxster catches up with the demand. Besides, we weren't looking for convertibles.

The models we chose, while hardly endangered species, are at least on the threatened list. Gone are two that would certainly have been included here: the Mazda RX-7 and the Nissan 300ZX. Although the Corvette is certainly new, this second-generation BMW M3 looks very much like a number of lesser Bimmer models (a point in its favor, stealth-minded M3 fans insist), and the 3000GT and the Supra soldier on with only the slightest styling tweaks and uncertain futures.

Granted, the M3 is a bit of a stretch to be singing in this quartet. The three others have swoopy, valet-impressing styling, while the M3 looks like what it is: a sports sedan disguised as a coupe. Feature for feature, it's also pricey when compared with the Vette, the Supra, and the 3000GT. In other words, we expect letters.

Sticker prices on our four cars range from a low of $41,255 for the Supra Turbo to a high of $47,462 for the Mitsubishi 3000GT VR4. Our Corvette costs $43,462, and our M3 lists for $43,101.

The Corvette wins the horsepower crown with 345. The M3 makes do with 240. Both the Supra and the 3000GT VR4 ring in with 320.

The Vette is the only genuine two-seater: We wouldn't want to sit in the rear of the three others, but we'd complain the least about the M3's more accommodating back seat. Unless you're hoping for a career as the Olsen twins' stunt double, you'll have to fold yourself into the rear of the 3000GT and the Supra. Although it may appear you've assumed a head-down praying position to beseech the driver to make this a short trip, really there isn't enough headroom back there to sit upright. At least the rear seats all fold down for extra luggage capacity.

But that's not why you'd buy one of these cars. All will go 0 to 60 mph in well under six seconds and turn at least 0.87 g on the skidpad. Likely, those are more your criteria than whether your mother-in-law would be comfortable in the passenger seat (she won't, unless she's Lyn St. James).

We spent three days on the road with these 40-granders, first heading west from our palatial Ann Arbor offices to far western Michigan and GingerMan Raceway, a nearly new 1.88-mile road course popular as an Indy-car test track. After an afternoon of flogging the cars there, we spent a night in Indiana before heading to the Hocking Hills region of southern O
 

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HIBBoyScott,


Great article, I remember that one from awhile back. The thing about magazine handling tests is in how they judge the cars. They don't judge the cars on how they handle in real world situations, they judge them on how they FEEL. That is why the M3 comes out on top in most handling tests, because it FEELS great, and you can drive easier at the limit. In an article I read awhile back, they even rated the M3 over a Viper GTS, but not only did the Viper pull more lateral g's, have a faster slalom time, and basically smoke the M3 in every possible way (other than comfort), the M3 still came out on top. I think magazines are a good way to get a general idea of a car's performance, but the only real way is to see for yourself.
 

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Yep, I agree. The M3 is tops because it feels good at the limit, not because it is the best in terms of hard numbers. I'm not a huge fan of the Viper, although I think it is a nice car, but it is kinda hard to argue with 8.0L, 10 cylinders, and LeMans victories...
 
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