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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone.

So I picked up a really nice 2005 IS300 a few weeks ago. It's a 5-speed with no LSD, but the car is basically mint with stacks of service records that came with it. The previous owner/s took very good care of the car and it shows. Anyways, I decided to park the car for the winter as I already have a winter beater to whip around in. It was suggested to me that since the IS will be sitting for a while, it might be a good idea to spray some fogging oil down the spark plug holes just to keep things lubricated.

Now allow me to state that I am definitely NOT the most car savvy guy, but this seemed like a pretty straight-forward task. I removed the plugs, sprayed in some fogging oil, hand cranked the engine a few times and that was that. Didn't think about it for a while.

However after doing some further research, it would seem that I went about this COMPLETELY wrong. I didn't blow off any of the dust and debris that naturally collects on the valve cover and around the spark plugs before I took them out. The area was pretty doggone dirty when I removed the plugs and I'm 99% certain that a fair amount of that dirt and dust found its way into the combustion chamber. :( On top of all that, when I sprayed the fogging oil in, the straw wasn't quite long enough to reach down into the actual spark plug holes. I sprayed it from about 1/2" - 1" away from the actual spark plug holes, inadvertently kicking up even MORE dust and debris which likely landed in the combustion chamber. :cry:

My original thoughts were "Oh, whatever lands in there will just burn up during the combustion process", but now, upon education myself a bit more on this matter, I'm very worried that this will cause catastrophic internal damage to this extraordinarily well-preserved, original engine. I feel like a complete dumb ass....

What are my options? I don't own an air compressor (yet), but I've thought about getting a few air dusters from Best Buy or Office Max and blowing out what I can. However, with fogging oil now in the cylinder, some of that dirt and dust may be stuck to the cylinder walls and/or between the piston rings and the cylinder walls and have already caused some damage when I hand cranked the engine.

This whole ordeal makes me absolutely sick. I finally, FINALLY find an ultra-clean IS300 and in trying to take steps to preserve it, I may have done something irreversibly bad.

Any of your thoughts on this are welcome. I've never taken an engine apart before, but if I have to tear this whole thing down to the block in order to "rescue" it, I'm prepared to do so. I love originality and this car is one of the few 5-speeds left that's been untouched, unmodified, has low mileage and (amazingly) has a clean title.

Thanks guys!
 

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Definitely won't do the kind of damage that would ruin your motor. The worst it may do is stuck to your rings for a few cycles and do a bit of very minor scoring on the cylinder walls. You'll be fine.
 

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Mr. Roo
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Yep, you'll be fine, it will just burn out no problem. Otherwise, you'd hear it very commonly about people ruining their engines just from a simple spark plug change.

I have those blue shop paper towels, and I used that in the spark plug cavity with a screwdriver and compressed air tank to get out all the dirt first. I'd say maybe you could try doing that through the spark plug holes, but it's not worth it and risking even more junk inside.
 

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Granted I live in a warmer state, I have never heard of "fogging oil", who gave you that advice?! You replaced the spark plugs while you were in there correct? I would just say, take it apart and clean it all properly, and take care of all the related maintenance simultaneously.
 

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Granted I live in a warmer state, I have never heard of "fogging oil", who gave you that advice?! You replaced the spark plugs while you were in there correct? I would just say, take it apart and clean it all properly, and take care of all the related maintenance simultaneously.
Fogging oil is generally used for lubrication for long term storage.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Appreciate your input everyone. Sounds like this shouldn't be too big of an issue although it's one I wish I would have avoided in the first place by exercising a little common sense. Lesson learned.

I picked-up a lighted borescope off of Amazon today. My idea is to take the spark plugs out again (after air blasting the dirt off the valve cover, of course) and to stick that little camera down each spark plug hole to see what actually fell inside. If there's anything substantial, I'll blast out what I can with some compressed air while holding a vacuum nozzle near the spark plug hole to hopefully catch whatever might fly out.

I have to get under the hood again anyway to replace the ignition coil clips. They snapped as I was unplugging them from the coils. I guess this is a pretty common issue, but luckily a pretty simple one to fix.

Really appreciate it, guys! This car means a lot to me and I want to make sure I'm doing everything I can to keep it in tip-top shape.
 

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I wouldn't be too concerned about damaging your engine, but I would recommend just keeping the tank topped off with E0 fuel and starting the car once every couple weeks during the non-driving season. Get a battery maintainer/float charger if you haven't already. I have a couple cars that don't see much use during the winter and I've never had to do anything too exotic to keep them in good shape. Best wishes!
 
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