Lexus IS Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Looking at 2 different 2007 GS 350's.
Would you rather...
A) Buy a car from the original owner with 176,000 miles with all maintenance records done by Lexus dealership. Ex, water pump, timing chain, spark plugs, replacement of both rear ox sensors, rear shock replacement. Tires and breaks about 50%.
Or
B) A car from the second owner with 109,000 miles but no records. Says water pump was changed. Tires & breaks both replaced within the last year.

Both cars are priced the same.

Due to the 60,000 miles being a pretty big difference it would in most cases be a no brainer, but the full record history is a great find.

Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
69 Posts
Did the owner of the second vehicle do their own maint? If not whatever dealer or shop they use should have records. I would vote the second car if you can get ahold of that info. 60k mile difference is pretty big chunk to consider. If you are pretty mechanically inclined you should be able to tell alot by looking the car over. If not you might consider the 100 dollar or so pre purchase inspection the Lexus/Toyota dealer could do. That is money well spent if you are not familiar with the mechanical side of a vehicle.

Some will argue that a 200k mile well maintained vehicle is better than a 100k mile vehicle that wasn't cared for. This is a pretty accurate staement but i would exhaust all options on the lower mileage vehicle becuase it may have been maintained very well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,270 Posts
I pay extra for a maintenance trail. Then again 60K miles is significant. It's a tough decision.

In your shoes, I'd probably inspect the low mileage one. Take the oil cap off and see if there are significant deposits. People not doing maintenance to their cars is very common, particularly when they get over 100K miles. The higher mileage one might have less wear if the lower mileage one got indifferent maintenance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I'd echo the sentiment of getting a pre-purchase inspection done. That is a large mileage difference, but taking care of maintenance items is more important to me than low mileage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I'd get the one with lower miles looked at and pull the trigger if there's no red flags. It's always appealing to have records and it shows the car was cared for, but just over 100K versus approaching 200K miles is a lot. I like the idea of checking with whatever shops the owner used and seeing if they have records too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
I am definitely no expert on what to look for so take the following for what it is...a non professional opinion:

Tough one but I'd echo what others have said...the lower mileage one is more interesting, just get it well checked out and don't count on what the owner is telling you. You might even get some hints and gut feelings by talking to the owner. Just as a random example, if they are clean organized people they might be organized about maintenance as well. Or if they talk loudly and clearly and look you in the eye as they explain the car to you, they may have nothing to hide. Absolutely not guarantees of any kind, but might be the intangible that helps you make a decision. Try to leave the emotion and 'I want it' out of it and evaluate the car as objectively as possible...

Could also Carfax it or buy a cheap scan tool and see what the OBD2 gives you.

Also, in my limited experience, brakes and oxygen sensors are not the most difficult/expensive things to replace, if needed (I replaced one in the front for $65 + a special socket and a breaker bar, total under $100 and you get to keep the tools afterwards). You can even have a look at the rotor wear pattern to get some idea on its condition and I can't remember but you might even get a glimpse of the brake pads from just looking at the parked car? Plus during the test drive you can listen and feel how the brakes are a bit. If the owner claims to have done it themselves, you could ask what kind of pads, and if they turned the rotor etc...obviously if they did it themselves, they should know all of the fine details about the job...like I know about my brake job. Again, in my inexperienced opinion, maybe you should focus on the condition of the big money items like the transmission, etc.?

Just because brakes were replaced is not necessarily a good thing either. Cheap pads I've heard are a poor investment, as well as 3rd party O2 sensors. Not just if it was done, but using quality parts is also a consideration. A reputable shop will likely use quality parts to avoid complaints down the line.

If this is bad advice of off topic then apologies in advance, but I did put the disclaimer at the top...

Good luck. :)
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top