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DISCLAIMER: The procedures, methods and products written up here was for my circumstances only and were performed on a 2001 Automatic. I make no promises that your results will be the same nor do I claim that this is the best way to do it. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!

PDF document w/ procedures and pictures>http://my.is/forums/attachments/f22...ns-now-attached-is300-brake-pad-rotor-diy.pdf

WARNING on working under a raised vehicle: This procedure requires that he vehicle be raised. Do not depend on the jack alone. Use jack stands and place them under the lift points as described in the owner’s manual.

Pad Replacement
Time Required: 1 to 1.5 hours

Rotor/Pad Replacement
Time Required: 2 to 2.5 hours

Tools Needed:
Pad Replacement
- torque wrench capable of up to 100 ft lbs
- 14mm box wrench
- 14mm 3/8” socket
- 17mm combination wrench
- dead-blow hammer (rubber hammer filled with buck shot)
- small wood block
- 6” c-clamp or very large channel locks
- Needle Nose Pliers
- metal pry bar or back of crescent wrench.
- masking Tape
- High quality grease.
- Small bungee cord or bent coat hanger.
- Turkey baster

Additional Tools Needed for Rotor/Pad Replacement.
- 12mm offset box wrench
- 17mm deep 3/8” socket
- 2” 3/8” extension
- 12mm bolt (I lost my thread gauge, but it should be a standard 12mm bolt)
- 220 grit sand paper

FRONT Pad/Rotor Replacement

Step 1. Jack up the car.
Step 2. Remove wheels
Step 3. Remove (2) 14mm caliper bolts. Use the dead blow hammer and gently tap the bolts off. If the bolt turn w/o loosening, use the 17mm open end wrench to hold down the sliding pin.

Step 4. Hang caliper with bungee cord or bent hanger. Remove Anti-Squeal springs. Remove brake pads. Minimum thickness of pad is 1mm.

Step 5. Remove 2 anti-squeal shims from old pads, do not discard. Note that inner pads have arrows that point in the direction of forward movement. Clean shims and reinstall onto new pads.
Step 5a. Put anti-squeal goop on pads prior to installation of inner and outer shims. Probably not necessary but I use it anyway.


Step 6. Remove a small amount of brake fluid from reservoir using turkey baster.
Step 7. Use wood block and c-clamp to compress both pistons fully back into caliper. Be careful not to scratch or mar the piston. Also pay attention to the piston boot. If torn consult with your dealer on a replacement.

Installation is in the reverse order. The following steps are for rotor replacement:

Step 8. Remove caliper bracket by removing (2) 17mm bolts. Use 17mm box wrench and the dead blow hammer. These are tight (87 ft lbs) so it is better to snap them loose than to try to apply constant pressure.

Step 9. Use 12mm bolt and grease well. Screw into 1 of 2 threaded holes in the old rotor. This will pry the rotor off the hub as it is likely rusted on. Use 12mm offset wrench or ratchet to slowly break the rotor loose from the hub. It will probably have a loud pop, once you hear that the rotor is loose and can be removed.


Step 10. Remove surface rust from hub with 220 grit sand paper.


Step 11. Retrieve caliper bracket and carefully remove sliding pins by pinching the rubber gasket and twisting the pin out. Clean the pin. Liberally apply grease and reinstall by twisting the pin back into the caliper bracket.

Installation is in reverse order.
Notes:
- Torqueing the caliper bracket bolts will be tricky as there is not much space. Use 17mm deep socket to gain clearance. Torque to 87 ft lbs.
- Use 2” 3/8” extension and std 14mm socket to torque caliper bolts to gain proper clearance. Torque to 25 ft lbs.

REAR Pad/Rotor Replacement

Step 1. Remove anti-squeal spring from rear of brake caliper. To remove, push and away from caliper as shown in picture.



Step 2. Using Needle nose pliers, remove clip from the pad guide pin. Remove pin from caliper.


Step 3. Both pads should now be accessible and can be removed by pulling the out toward the rear of the car.
Step 4. Draw a small amount of brake fluid from reservoir
Step 5. Wrap the metal pry bar or back of crescent wrench with masking tape to protect piston. Using lever, push piston back into the caliper. Note: If you remove both pads and push the piston in, the opposing piston will push back out. Start by pushing one of the pistons in. Once complete. Insert one of the new pads and then push the opposing piston in. At this point both pistons should be pushed in far enough to put in the new pads. Minimum thickness of pad is 1mm.


Step 6. Remove 2 anti-squeal shims from old pads, do not discard. Note that inner pads have arrows that point in the direction of forward movement. Clean shims and reinstall onto new pads.
Step 6a. Put anti-squeal goop on pads prior to installation of inner and outer shims. Probably not necessary but I use it anyway.

Installation is in the reverse order. The following steps are for rotor replacement:

Step 7. Remove caliper by removing (2) 17mm bolts. Use 17mm box wrench and the dead blow hammer. These are tight (77 ft lbs) so it is better to snap them loose than to try to apply constant pressure.

Step 8. Use 12mm bolt and grease well. Screw into 1 of 2 threaded holes in the old rotor. This will pry the rotor off the hub as it is likely rusted on. Use 12mm offset wrench or ratchet to slowly break the rotor loose from the hub. It will probably have a loud pop, once you hear that the rotor is loose and can be removed.


Step 9. Remove surface rust from hub with 220 grit sand paper.
Step 10. Remove rubber plug on old rotor and install on new rotor. When installing, line up rubber plug with the hole (there is only 1) in the hub.

Step 11. I applied a small amount of grease to the hub/rotor mating surface because the new rotors don’t have the threaded 12mm pry bolt holes. The CAD plating should help prevent the rotors from rusting to the hub, but I want to be sure I can get these off at a later date..

Installation is in reverse order.

Pic of how to re-install the anti-squeal clip:


Done:


Notes:
- Use 17mm deep socket to gain clearance when torquing the caliper. Torque to 77 ft lbs.

New rotor/pad break-in procedure:
Warped Rotor Myth

If your rear brakes squeal excessivley after you have replaced the pads, see this thread. Likely it means that the rear anti-squeal clip is worn out and needs to be bent out. See this thread:
http://my.is/forums/showthread.php?t=263478

PDF with pics>http://my.is/forums/attachments/f22...ns-now-attached-is300-brake-pad-rotor-diy.pdf
 

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Don't have the energy to read it all, but even for effort alone, it's worth a +rep. :approve:
 

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Apricot idea killer
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Good write up and good pics. Some very detailed stuff in there that's not absolutely needed, but good that you're being picky about it! +rep
 

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Nice write up. I just did mine the other day, and it was relatively easy. Hardest part was finding a bolt to pop off the rotors. + rep!
 

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where was this a week ago when I did my Rotora slotted rotors & my axxis ultimate pads.+rep

ps good luck with your axxis pads my suck a$$ I'm going to use OEM ones.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
jvillagran2000 said:
where was this a week ago when I did my Rotora slotted rotors & my axxis ultimate pads.+rep

ps good luck with your axxis pads my suck a$$ I'm going to use OEM ones.
Tell me about it! They dust like mad and stop no better than stock. If anyone were to ask me again if they should get Axxis, I would say, "Hell No!".

Thanks all for the +Reps, very nice of you.
 

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great job on the writeup.

note that the service manual recommends changing at least the inner shims. plus it seems that the anti-squeal goop that comes with them works much better than that blue stuff you can get at the auto parts store.
 

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Hiroshima said:
Tell me about it! They dust like mad and stop no better than stock. If anyone were to ask me again if they should get Axxis, I would say, "Hell No!".

Thanks all for the +Reps, very nice of you.
oh btw my axxis ultimates melted the plastic coating on the inner shim the one with the vents so I had to get new ones not cheap it ran me about $110 for the an entire shim kit front and back.
 

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I'm sooooo glad this is a sticky. I'll be replacing my pads next week. +rep :approve:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Added new information on how to fix a squeaky rear brake. The rear anti-squeal clip can wear out and after it is reinstalled, may not do a good job of preventing the rear pads from squealing.

If the rear brakes squeal when you have new pads, the spring clips in the rear are likely stretched out. You can remove them and bend the two clips that rest against the rear pads *OUT* towards the center of the rotor. This solved my problem.

If it is in the rear, this is the most likely culprit.

See the pic "After anti-squal clip is loose" (sorry for the crappy spelling). The 'U' shaped spring should not look like it does in the picture to work properly. It should not be parallel to the clip back. They should point away from the back of the clip. Don't bend them too far as if you do, they can break.

Jeff
 

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oneeyejack said:
hehe...sorry i didn't read it all either but just a FYI, you don't need to use that goop stuff.
He went a little overboard with it, but it is helpful for keeping the squeel away and for the fronts it will spot the annoying "click"
 

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finally the search button works. This tread was just what i was looking for.
 

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Anyone run into adverse effects from pushing the brake piston back and allowing the brake fluid to flow back to the reservoir? Any possible problems from doing this? Or is it better to open the bleeder so that the brake fluid doesn't flow back to the reservoir?
 

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-Possible problems is that brake fluid will eat paint if it overflows from the reservoir, wash it off immediately.
-You could always use a syringe or something similar to suck the fluid out of the reservoir before pushing the pistons back.
-If you open the bleeder on the calipers, I think you run the risk of getting air into the system, then you will have to bleed it and that will take a little more time.
 

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lexyis300 said:
-Possible problems is that brake fluid will eat paint if it overflows from the reservoir, wash it off immediately.
-You could always use a syringe or something similar to suck the fluid out of the reservoir before pushing the pistons back.
-If you open the bleeder on the calipers, I think you run the risk of getting air into the system, then you will have to bleed it and that will take a little more time.
Thanks for the reply.

I already know all three items you listed. But what I'd really like to know is if there is anyone that encountered problems after allowing the brake fluid to flow back to the reservoir. Other than overflow and the brake fluid eating at your paint, anyone encounter problems with the master cylinder or anything like that?
 

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is300_white said:
Thanks for the reply.

I already know all three items you listed. But what I'd really like to know is if there is anyone that encountered problems after allowing the brake fluid to flow back to the reservoir. Other than overflow and the brake fluid eating at your paint, anyone encounter problems with the master cylinder or anything like that?
Not fully understanding what you mean by pushing it back and causing any problems? I did my last 10 brake jobs like that by pushing the piston back and letting the fluid return to the tank, and watching that it doesn't overflow, and no problems. I guess what you are asking is if there is anything with reversing the flow of the fluid?
 
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