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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
so , would i be needing to get rear adjustable toe rods to help zero out the toe and bring back the camber ? i’m on coilovers and i have replaced trailin arms from rock auto .
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2002 Lexus IS300
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You would need adjustable upper control arms up front to correct that camber. Also in the rear, you would need adjustable upper control arms to fix that camber and you can get adjustable toe arms to fix the toe.

the negative camber I understand from lowering the car, what doesn’t make sense is how far off your right rear toe is. Was the car hit? Something seems bent to be that far off compared to the left side.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You would need adjustable upper control arms up front to correct that camber. Also in the rear, you would need adjustable upper control arms to fix that camber and you can get adjustable toe arms to fix the toe.

the negative camber I understand from lowering the car, what doesn’t make sense is how far off your right rear toe is. Was the car hit? Something seems bent to be that far off compared to the left side.
You would need adjustable upper control arms up front to correct that camber. Also in the rear, you would need adjustable upper control arms to fix that camber and you can get adjustable toe arms to fix the toe.

the negative camber I understand from lowering the car, what doesn’t make sense is how far off your right rear toe is. Was the car hit? Something seems bent to be that far off compared to the left side.
one of the techs assumed that as well but also assume that i might maxed out the bolt which i did do the reason might be getting some adjustable toe rods to help w the toe and camber a little bit
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
one of the techs assumed that as well but also assume that i might maxed out the bolt which i did do the reason might be getting some adjustable toe rods to help w the toe and camber a little bit
i replaced the bent trailin rods but the toe and other are fine
 

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I suspect a set of Figs rear toe links will allow you to take care of this, no problem. They also have substantially better bump-steer characteristics, especially for lowered cars.

They will not, however, do anything for your excessive negative camber. As mentioned, you can buy upper control arms with a balljoint that fits into a slot - providing you with adjustable camber. Personally I'm not in love with that concept. Figs sells rear lower control arms, that have a rod-end (heim joint) on the inboard end, which allows you alter camber. It's a more elegant (though also more costly) approach towards dealing with excessive camber in the rear:



When you go back to the alignment shop, make sure they set up your car with (in-spec) NEGATIVE toe, both front and rear. Positive toe makes a car twitchy and want to dart around and wander, following grooves and undulations in the road. You definitely want a smidgeon of toe, but you want it to be negative, which makes the car track straight and feel nice and stable.

I encourage anyone handy/technical to perform their own alignment at least once. Our cars are nice for this because there are good chassis datums both front and rear - which allow you to establish a really nice chassis centerline from which to take your measurements and make adjustments. It's a slow, tedious process, but quite rewarding. Hint: use the metric system when you do this. Dealing with 1/32s of an inch gets very confusing, very fast! ~1/2mm is a perfect size increment to work with and very easy to keep track of.

These are the excellent datums:



I drilled/tapped the heads of the bolts that hold the subframes to their chassis datum pins, and then made these, so I could hang plumb bobs from each of the chassis datums. From here, you just need a set of toe plates to lay everything out.

 

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I suspect a set of Figs rear toe links will allow you to take care of this, no problem. They also have substantially better bump-steer characteristics, especially for lowered cars.

They will not, however, do anything for your excessive negative camber. As mentioned, you can buy upper control arms with a balljoint that fits into a slot - providing you with adjustable camber. Personally I'm not in love with that concept. Figs sells rear lower control arms, that have a rod-end (heim joint) on the inboard end, which allows you alter camber. It's a more elegant (though also more costly) approach towards dealing with excessive camber in the rear:



When you go back to the alignment shop, make sure they set up your car with (in-spec) NEGATIVE toe, both front and rear. Positive toe makes a car twitchy and want to dart around and wander, following grooves and undulations in the road. You definitely want a smidgeon of toe, but you want it to be negative, which makes the car track straight and feel nice and stable.

I encourage anyone handy/technical to perform their own alignment at least once. Our cars are nice for this because there are good chassis datums both front and rear - which allow you to establish a really nice chassis centerline from which to take your measurements and make adjustments. It's a slow, tedious process, but quite rewarding. Hint: use the metric system when you do this. Dealing with 1/32s of an inch gets very confusing, very fast! ~1/2mm is a perfect size increment to work with and very easy to keep track of.

These are the excellent datums:



I drilled/tapped the heads of the bolts that hold the subframes to their chassis datum pins, and then made these, so I could hang plumb bobs from each of the chassis datums. From here, you just need a set of toe plates to lay everything out.

Do you always do your alignments by yourself?
 
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