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I can hear my driveshaft clunk a little bit when I give my car gas, which suggests I need diff bushings I think. So I take a trip to ShopFigs and of course I go down the rabbit hole of wanting every single bushing, or looking at things I know I don't need. What I think I need is the rear diff package plus the supplemental subframe collar bushings. I always wondered why people bought these supplemental bushings and the answer is quite simple: no one makes a replacement. Alright then. I'll document my findings once I feel like fixing that. I get paid Friday, I might be able to move some money around to afford them comfortably. This might also solve the classic AR5 vibration of death exactly at highway speed.
I have some Ikeya Formula sub-frame collars gathering dust if you want them. They definitely helped along with the FIGS diff bushings when I had everything installed prior to opting for the nuclear option from serialnine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #162 ·
I got a TRD shift knob because I thought I'd buy one before they get expensive and I hate to admit this pea-sized, unweighted $30 knob feels so much better than my $100 Steel GReddy knob. Way to go lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #163 ·
Started doing the diff bushings earlier, but weather says otherwise. I noticed that my diff bolts from my driveshaft were all loose, but since they were thread locked they still held in place. Very strange. Another thing I would like to say is that the rear diff bolts are in there really tight. Really tight. I think Toyota used a red thread lock on them. I'm not dropping the subframe, I just got (shafted on) an alignment and don't want to pay for another one. Of course you can't get a rachet in between there and the tire well, but I'll figure it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #164 ·
I really wish I could do a little build on my diff, but this isn't the ideal diff to build. I don't have the GReddy cover that I would want and it's not a manual or Tacoma LSD. I needed the bushings though. The stock ones were tore all around the through holes. The rear bushings seem okay still, but I have new ones to replace them with. More of a fix than a mod, but this has now opened my eyes to SuperPro bushings and I really like them. I want them everywhere now. I've said bushing countless times in the past 48 hours.

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I remember replacing the car’s bushings. Some were fun, some were hell. The rear bushings on the diff were hell getting out til I got a air chisel. Then they were gravy, literally. The juice came out. I had to build a jig to get the replacements pressed in cuz theres not room to beat them in with a mallet. The diff’s stub shaft bolts sucked too.

I’d not seen that greddy diff cover. That is some nice kit. Not cheap either. I’d have to debate spending that, vs getting a GS big diff, LSD, and replacing the axles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #166 ·
I remember replacing the car’s bushings. Some were fun, some were hell. The rear bushings on the diff were hell getting out til I got a air chisel. Then they were gravy, literally. The juice came out. I had to build a jig to get the replacements pressed in cuz theres not room to beat them in with a mallet. The diff’s stub shaft bolts sucked too.
These weren't so bad. You just have to beat the daylights out of them is all. Then the SuperPro stuff is pretty easy to set in by hand. I didn't think mine had juice left in them but about halfway through the beatdown one squirted on the ground, gross. I also had a rough time with the shaft bolts, I thought I stripped one twice, but I beat the allen with a bigger hammer and it came right out.
I’d not seen that greddy diff cover. That is some nice kit. Not cheap either. I’d have to debate spending that, vs getting a GS big diff, LSD, and replacing the axles.
It's pretty cool, but I'd only do it if I know this diff is going to last. The price is prohibitive right now and there are many other options depending on how much power I want to put down. I wonder how long the auto LSD will last at mid 500's when it's turned up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #167 ·
Today I did the rear bushings. To remove these two you have to hammer them from the inside around the edges. Try to knock the lips inward so they don't mushroom and become stuck. I recommend you unbolt your sway bar mounts as well.
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Doing this with the subframe in the car is a bit of an exercise of patience. You need to think carefully about what it is that you're doing or you could end up with a breaker bar stuck between your diff bolt and tire well. This might have happened to me and I think I ended up bending the tire well more to pull it out. I don't have a spare so I honestly don't care what happens back there.
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Another word of advice is to beat the 8mm allen/hex socket into the axle shaft bolts with a hammer every time. I felt my hairline recess by about a millimeter yesterday over one single bolt that wouldn't come out.
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These slid in with the provided grease very easily, just as advertised. They also can go in from the front or the back, whichever is easier for you. One thing to note is that the bushing on the right needs to be lined up precisely or else you can't get both bolts in. That was probably the most frustrating part of the install.

This got rid of 95% of my highway vibration at 70 mph. It is still present above that, but the highways don't exceed 70 around here so neither will I. I didn't mess with any driveline angles and I assumed the bushings put the diff in the correct spot. It also eliminated the clunking whenever I'd shift gears, or got on the throttle. Overall pretty satisfied.
 

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I remember replacing the car’s bushings. Some were fun, some were hell. The rear bushings on the diff were hell getting out til I got a air chisel. Then they were gravy, literally. The juice came out. I had to build a jig to get the replacements pressed in cuz theres not room to beat them in with a mallet. The diff’s stub shaft bolts sucked too.
Damn, that sounds rough. Is that normal?
 

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Damn, that sounds rough. Is that normal?
Yes. My buddy and I learned the hard way that these bushings were hydraulic. The splooge that came out was disgusting - and it had a warming effect on the skin kinda like brake fluid.

@_zaclemore Too late now, but you prolly shoulda installed one of the Fig's rear subframe reinforcement plates...

 

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Discussion Starter · #172 ·
Yes. My buddy and I learned the hard way that these bushings were hydraulic. The splooge that came out was disgusting - and it had a warming effect on the skin kinda like brake fluid.

@_zaclemore Too late now, but you prolly shoulda installed one of the Fig's rear subframe reinforcement plates...

Good thing I checked after I re-installed my diff that the stock IS300 rear end is pretty stout as-is, kind of a relief. I know the weld-in will help a lot under high intensity racing or what have you, but I plan on racing maybe once a month and doing street hits occasionally (I mean never ;)). If I were to pull the subframe out, I'd be sure to do that upgrade, but I don't find it 100% necessary for my goals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #173 ·
Replaced my fuel pressure regulator diaphragm today. You shouldn't have fuel where the vacuum line goes.
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Set base pressure back to 45 PSI.
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Here's my circuit opening relay bypass to run the fuel pump when the key is put in. Helpful for troubleshooting and testing, also works as a "permanent" bypass, but I figure Lexus has a relay there for a reason. Side note, the car runs fine until I hit boost. I feel like when I took a degree of timing out, it got happier because it needs more fuel up top. I thought something "hard" went wrong, but everything seems to be in check.
 

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Discussion Starter · #174 ·
Another day, another update it seems. Went to the junkyard and picked up some GS aluminum rear upper control arms. $48 for the set, not bad.
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Of course now I have to figure out how to remove the stock bushings and get some SuperPro ones in there. Speaking of SuperPro, apparently they make ball joint boots, which I promptly ordered to replace my damaged ones. I was going to buy new ball joints but these are still super smooth, I cleaned one completely out and there was zero play, so I'll repack them and see if these boots will fit right, it may require some stretching. While I'm on the bushing craze, I might buy some steering rack bushings just to save on shipping, I noticed my response is a little lacking. That could also be any of the other bushings, like the classic #1 or #2 bushings. Seems like the more I look into this, the less I actually want to do them because bushings are hard. Plain and simple. If anyone has any tips on how to remove the old bushings in these control arms, let me know!

I also took up @Mzs14 's offer for these Ikeya Formula subframe collars. I did some reading and a lot of people with other cars say they're either kind of forgettable or will ruin the car. I took the chance and to be honest, I don't really like them. I now notice a lot of body roll that wasn't there before which is strange. I also hear a lot more diff noise, some more clunking at certain points (if I'm not 100% nice with the shifting) there's a small vibration at around 1500 RPM in lower gears, but beside that it's fine. To be fully transparent, this was a relatively low speed test, the quickest I went was 45 MPH and it just sounded like there was a little more road noise. Maybe I'm just nit picking.
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This is how someone on YouTube had the front upper collar set up. I don't know if it's proper, but everything lined up right, so.
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Here are the fronts fully installed, you don't realize how tight 94 ft-lbs is until you're doing it 4 times under a car with no room.
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Not the hardest thing to install, since you can't just lower the subframe and slide them in, like their design suggests. You actually have to drop the whole thing about an inch, have the diff supported and unbolt the coilovers. At least I can say I have Ikeya Formula parts now.

Finally, we have the real star of the show, the eBay Special Broadway Mirror. It's honestly pretty terrible, but for $12 shipped it's pretty good. By terrible I mean it's pretty stupid to have a clip on mirror, especially the non-convex one and the blue is pretty hard to see out of (I'll have to get over that for an upcoming little add-on.) By pretty good I mean, the mirror is, well, a mirror. It's not cloudy or hazy, the blue is pretty consistent and it does everything it says it would. It's reflective and blue. It's $12. If I hate it I can stick it back in the box and throw it in my closet or something. I rarely even use the rear view mirror so it's gonna stay, even if it is a fake.
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Bushings are a tedious, messy job. Generally speaking, I've found a shop press with a nice accompaniment of various plate, pipe and puck fixtures - and/or a good air chisel to be the best means of removing.

I've ever resorted to the blue-tip wrench, but it makes a god awful stink and greasy/rubbery mess. Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.

Installation is better, but one or two of the one-piece super pro control arm bushings where I needed to machine up a "bushing funnel" to get it started. Without the funnel, it would squirm around instead of going into its home.

For my rear subframe, i simply filled the original bushings with 3M window weld, which is about 65A durometer, and firmed them up quite a bit. Mine were in good shape to begin with though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #176 ·
Bushings are a tedious, messy job. Generally speaking, I've found a shop press with a nice accompaniment of various plate, pipe and puck fixtures - and/or a good air chisel to be the best means of removing.
I have a cheapo bottle jack style press, probably from Harbor Freight, so I'll look into a bearing kit since I have some spare cash now.

I've ever resorted to the blue-tip wrench, but it makes a god awful stink and greasy/rubbery mess. Sometimes you gotta do what you gotta do.
I'd do the same, but I'm afraid of damaging the aluminum, if it was steel I'd be a lot less careful.

Installation is better, but one or two of the one-piece super pro control arm bushings where I needed to machine up a "bushing funnel" to get it started. Without the funnel, it would squirm around instead of going into its home.
The RUCA ones are two piece, which should be super easy to install. Looking back to my diff, the bushings went in like nothing.

For my rear subframe, i simply filled the original bushings with 3M window weld, which is about 65A durometer, and firmed them up quite a bit. Mine were in good shape to begin with though.
I saw some people did this when I Googled the subframe collars. Maybe I should have went the same route, but I think I'll get over it. I might try that in my #1 and #2 bushings up front since they are torn if I remember right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #177 ·
Took the car for another test drive and it's safe to say that I hate the collars. It must have messed with my driveline angles because my car is a vibrating wreck above 60 MPH just like it used to be. Instead of playing with the angles, I'll just remove the collars (yay for me) and I might pick up some 3M Windo Weld. It's not often that I undo a mod, but I have no option at this point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #178 · (Edited)
Checked more threads and according to user lessthanjakejohn (this post here), a CV joint aluminum driveshaft will solve the issue. This is the style a solstice uses from factroy. Kinda wish I found that out 2 months ago. (Or searched better) Oh well, money is for spending and I can't deal with this vibration. I just emailed DriveShaftShop on a quote for a CV shaft. I really don't want to take out those collars, they were such a pain to install and you don't really notice them under normal circumstances. I imagine a proper driveshaft will smooth the edges.
 

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picked up some GS aluminum rear upper control arms.
What’s the advantage, besides weight? Do they change the camber or what?

I would say burn them out, but Al melts at a pretty low temp. So I’d get a coping saw and put the blade thru the hole and cut thru the rubber and metal collar. It’s tedious AF but I don’t think I’d go beating on it or cooking it for fear of damaging the thing. Do you have an air chisel? They are cheap at HF. They work great at crushing the metal bushing collar and driving it out. I don’t know if it would damage the cast Al though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #180 ·
What’s the advantage, besides weight? Do they change the camber or what?

I would say burn them out, but Al melts at a pretty low temp. So I’d get a coping saw and put the blade thru the hole and cut thru the rubber and metal collar. It’s tedious AF but I don’t think I’d go beating on it or cooking it for fear of damaging the thing. Do you have an air chisel? They are cheap at HF. They work great at crushing the metal bushing collar and driving it out. I don’t know if it would damage the cast Al though.
I just saw a video on PoorManMods YouTube of him burning the bushings out then using an air chisel to beat out the steel tube. He went a little overboard and damaged some of the outside of the arm, but functionally it seems fine. The aluminum turned black but it ended up fine. I might pick up an air chisel, seems like I have no other options really. Also, the aluminum arm is a half pound lighter and I figured it was a cool OEM upgrade.
 
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