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1UZ-FE or 2JZ-GTE

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've found that it would probably be in my best interest to do a complete engine swap away from the stock GE motor as I am attempting to make a track car out of my '02 is300 (mainly time attack and some minor bumper to bumper racing). The two motors I am considering are the 1UZ-FE and the 2JZ-GTE. I have done a lot of research for both of these engines and have weighed the pros and cons of having both. I have found the aftermarket support for the 2jz to be better in the sense of more available stock and non-stock upgrades. However, the 1UZ is a whole lot cheaper. My plan was to only purchase a short-block because I am going to have to change the internals anyway in order to reach the power goals I would like to use for racing (which is around 650 wheel and the same or better torque). I'm also not familiar in the way VVTI works for if I were to buy a long-block for each motor. I was planning on running a different cam in order to get more tuning capability, but i'm not sure if VVTI is like V-Tec where it's the cam that makes the valve adjustments or if it's ran off of the ECU. I'm going to run an aftermarket ECU anyway so I don't know if I should even be worried about VVTI. I would love to get some feedback and see what you guys think would be a better swap for racing applications. Thank you!
 

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First off you've got to nail down exactly what racing class you want to compete/play in - and obviously set up a powertrain that is allowable.

If you are free to choose anything you want and think you need 650whp to compete (dang, that's a fast car), I don't see how you're going to get there without forced induction - without a very crazy NA build, anyway.

So that said, I'd use an aluminum chevy V8. You can get an aluminum 5.3L for low money, and it'll easily make 650whp with a little boost. And parts are plentiful and cheap.

If you're bent on a toyota powerplant - pick the biggest one you can get.

This project is gonna cost big money.

VVTi is very different than Vtec. Whereas Vtec is binary, and switches the cam follower from one lobe to another - VVTi alters the phasing of the intake cam in relation to the crankshaft. This is done via controlling the duty cycle of a solenoid valve that adjusts how much oil pressure is applied to the VVTi actuator. Most programmable ecu's these days are easily able to control VVTi solenoids, so you'd be dumb to skip it. It adds low-speed/mid range torque and costs nothing on the top end.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited by Moderator)
First off you've got to nail down exactly what racing class you want to compete/play in - and obviously set up a powertrain that is allowable.
My main problem with finding classes to run in are I don't have many tracks that are within 8 hours away and they dont list what classes they permit or what events they hold. I'm also not really sure what kind of classes there are and the limitations within it.

My problem with an LS swap is I feel like I'd have cut a lot more to make it fit compared to the 1UZ. I have watched videos on putting the 5.3 in an IS and I was more drawn to the 1UZ for a V8 option. The 2jz is just such a well known engine and since mounts and all that can fit straight in the IS the swap would be much simpler I feel like compared to the others. Forced induction was always in the plan as well no matter what engine I'm going to put in it.

Also thank you for explaining VVTI. I didn't know that it would be simpler to keep that. Do stock VVTI cams hold up to and help make good power?
 

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Not to be a dick, but how on earth can you put together a competition car without first choosing a competition to compete in? Step one is deciding that and acquiring the rulebook for it. Better if you study the last 5 revisions to get a feel for how the rules have changed - so you can envision/predict what the rules will be in the future - so you can plan ahead.

I said this last year when you first posted about putting together a track car with your son, and it still applies 100%:

Buy a turn-key track car and go play. It's cheaper than building your own and you can immediately go play. Get a couple years of that under your belt and go from there.

If you're bent on an IS300 - just get yours all mechanically sound and go beat on it at the track. Get a couple years of that under your belt and go from there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Not to be a dick, but how on earth can you put together a competition car without first choosing a competition to compete in? Step one is deciding that and acquiring the rulebook for it. Better if you study the last 5 revisions to get a feel for how the rules have changed - so you can envision/predict what the rules will be in the future - so you can plan ahead.

I said this last year when you first posted about putting together a track car with your son, and it still applies 100%:

Buy a turn-key track car and go play. It's cheaper than building your own and you can immediately go play. Get a couple years of that under your belt and go from there.

If you're bent on an IS300 - just get yours all mechanically sound and go beat on it at the track. Get a couple years of that under your belt and go from there.
Driving and racing in a track setting is a passion I've been chasing for a long time now. I'd more or less just go and drive on an open track day if I couldn't compete due to regulations. Like i said there aren't really any competitive tracks near and none that I have called or researched don't give me a clear answer on what classes the host. If you could give any insight on what to look for or just a general idea of what classes there are that would be great. I've tried just googling it but I get so many different answers I'm not sure of any specifics.

I do remember the thread from last year I made talking about the race car subject and don't think everyones comments on that went unnoticed. I have done a bunch of car shopping and looking at already built cars, but nothing has gotten me more excited about starting this journey than just seeing my IS parked in the garage. I'm only 21 so who knows how my feelings will change on how I stand on the car but at this moment I feel like I need this car for my dream of driving. Also, I understand keeping this car will be much more expensive than others, but I'm not going to rush the process and only get premium parts that can be refined for the track. My son is 2 so I'm also not in a rush trying to put together a car with a kid that can hold a wrench. I'm down for the long run with this car, but I just want more out of it than what the stock motor and hardware can give me. The end goal is one of those engines I mentioned in this thread with the power numbers I also mention. Suspension and aero are the first priority and also the first upgrades I'm going to do, but I want to go ahead and get a shot-block of one of those engines in order to slowly start to put it together.
 

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I've found that it would probably be in my best interest to do a complete engine swap away from the stock GE motor as I am attempting to make a track car out of my '02 is300 (mainly time attack and some minor bumper to bumper racing). The two motors I am considering are the 1UZ-FE and the 2JZ-GTE. I have done a lot of research for both of these engines and have weighed the pros and cons of having both. I have found the aftermarket support for the 2jz to be better in the sense of more available stock and non-stock upgrades. However, the 1UZ is a whole lot cheaper. My plan was to only purchase a short-block because I am going to have to change the internals anyway in order to reach the power goals I would like to use for racing (which is around 650 wheel and the same or better torque). I'm also not familiar in the way VVTI works for if I were to buy a long-block for each motor. I was planning on running a different cam in order to get more tuning capability, but i'm not sure if VVTI is like V-Tec where it's the cam that makes the valve adjustments or if it's ran off of the ECU. I'm going to run an aftermarket ECU anyway so I don't know if I should even be worried about VVTI. I would love to get some feedback and see what you guys think would be a better swap for racing applications. Thank you!
If you have an 01' go 1UZ-FE
02-05 go 3UZ-FE, wiring is much easier.

You can't turbo a UZ without cutting up the front core support, unless it's a rear mount turbo
 

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Not to be a dick, but how on earth can you put together a competition car without first choosing a competition to compete in? Step one is deciding that and acquiring the rulebook for it. Better if you study the last 5 revisions to get a feel for how the rules have changed - so you can envision/predict what the rules will be in the future - so you can plan ahead.

I said this last year when you first posted about putting together a track car with your son, and it still applies 100%:

Buy a turn-key track car and go play. It's cheaper than building your own and you can immediately go play. Get a couple years of that under your belt and go from there.

If you're bent on an IS300 - just get yours all mechanically sound and go beat on it at the track. Get a couple years of that under your belt and go from there.
This lol. A tastefully moded is300 will be a riot on track at stock power ish. Really driving the car will give you an idea of where to invest time and money based on class rules. Jumping into a A class car can be a disaster if your not familiar with the car and know how to drive it all out. Especially with 650hp. I'd also be concerned on getting your money worth if there's no track close as you'll find yourself going less often. You can call your local tracks and see what events they've held in the past and the classes. One thing to look for would be autox which is much more common doesn't require a track and is much cheaper and nicer on cars.
 
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